U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Where do talented new doctors tend to establish themselves?
Near affluent, metropolitan areas where they can more rapidly recoup their investment 21 77.78%
Equally distributed and available most places 6 22.22%
Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-23-2014, 08:52 AM
 
5,397 posts, read 6,540,598 times
Reputation: 10472

Advertisements

Where do talented younger doctors tend to establish their practices? In an urbanish area or equally distributed anywhere but includes a resortish type area?

My sister (who is a retiring nurse practitioner and I am not in the medical business) and I were at opposite end on this question. I was thinking it would be smart to pick my retirement location with a strong factor being that good specialists fresh out of the various fellowships, etc would be going for the places where they could recoup the financial output and pay off student debt. Basically that they know their value and would establish themselves accordingly. She believed that good doctors can be found everywhere and that you could retire even to an area without it being a concern. She maintained that good doctors are everywhere and with medical advances even in outlying areas, good care would be just as available.

Does anyone have any experience with this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-23-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,850,322 times
Reputation: 6379
I would agree with your sister in this point. I would not use doctors as the deciding factor unless it is a tie in all other aspects. The point being why move to a location just because the is a particular movie playing that week. If you do then you will be miserable if there is nothing else you like. That would be the same idea. You have your list of things you want in and around your home wherever you plan. That should include so many of the other factors such as COL and your friends. I think the only point your sister should have said is that it should not be the only factor.

I am editing this so I can explain my vote of equally distributed. The reason is that putting a glut of doctors in an affluent area will not increase that doctor's marketability. It will only decrease the number of patients he will have to chose from.

Last edited by oldsoldier1976; 05-23-2014 at 09:26 AM.. Reason: Edititing for the poll
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 09:21 AM
 
32 posts, read 44,662 times
Reputation: 86
I would hope all new doctors are somewhat talented, do you have any idea how difficult it is to get admitted to medical school , survive medical school and residency (and know you are several hundred thousands of dollars in debt to boot!) while all your peers have been working, have kids already etc? Doctors are people and go to 1)where they get a good residency in their field and 2)where their family is because they are human and 3) other reasons anybody else chooses to live where they live. Disclaimer: my child is a new talented dr and picked where to live based on family.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,926 posts, read 990,367 times
Reputation: 6960
I have no idea where talented new doctors establish themselves, but I like older, experienced, open minded doctors myself. Being open minded has more to do with personality than education, but it is as important to me as credentials. I need to trust my doctor's ability as a doctor but I also need to have a good personal relationship and I don't do well with whippersnappers.

I have lived here for 5 years. It took 3 to find a medical person who suits me. I asked people I met socially who they saw and a neighbor recommended her. She is a nurse practitioner who sends me to a doctor of her choosing when she decides I need to see one. I do my followup with her. She hasn't steered me wrong yet.

If I had a specific condition that required ongoing care, and I had hope that treating it aggressively would improve my quality of life, I would move near a facility that provided such care and make it a priority.

My husband had a chronic type of leukemia. He lived for 16+ years after his dx. He had a young, energetic, driven, perhaps brilliant oncologist. I don't think my husband would have lived near so long, and I know the quality of his life would have suffered, without his older, more experienced with life in general GP. If we could have only had one or the other, I would have chosen the GP.

Sorry to be so chatty. I'm not sure I answered your question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
Reputation: 32309
I have long been of the opinion that most people who claim to have a great doctor really haven't the faintest idea whether that doctor is good, bad, or indifferent. What they mean is they LIKE their doctor - he somehow makes them feel good psychologically.

Any large, teaching hospital is almost certain to be a good one. There is tremendous snobbism at work with people convincing themselves that their hospital and/or their doctor is such hot stuff.

Hospitals which specialize in rare conditions/diseases may well be the exception. If one has that rare condition/disease, then a hospital specializing in it may be truly superior.

I have never quite understood the attitude/expectation that we are going to be very sick/have medical emergencies and therefore we need to plan our retirement around proximity to a large hospital. Most of the population of the United States lives in urban and suburban areas, not out in the boonies somewhere. Therefore most of us live in close proximity to good medical care - by definition.

What's all the worry and agonizing about? It seems to me to be some sort of anxiety disorder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 10:57 AM
 
5,397 posts, read 6,540,598 times
Reputation: 10472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jardinbelle View Post
I would hope all new doctors are somewhat talented, do you have any idea how difficult it is to get admitted to medical school , survive medical school and residency (and know you are several hundred thousands of dollars in debt to boot!) while all your peers have been working, have kids already etc? Doctors are people and go to 1)where they get a good residency in their field and 2)where their family is because they are human and 3) other reasons anybody else chooses to live where they live. Disclaimer: my child is a new talented dr and picked where to live based on family.
Actually I do know. My daughter's (now in dental school) friends were in the medical school at the university by my house. New medical school First year class was free tuition and fees, even included paper and stuff. Second year class 75% tuition free, and so on.

What a deal, so those kids selected were the absolute remarkable ones who could get accepted into any program. And they worked so hard and smart.

So I got to know them well and even being intelligent, talented, and special enough to get into a medical school tuition free there were some amongst them who were clearly superior and were headed for interesting futures. And those would be ones I would want if I needed a true specialist.

So knowing that, I wonder where they will settle to practice when they are through with all of their multiple residencies, fellowships, etc. Go for the money? Go near family? Or pick a quality of life area.

I was thinking past the residencies and fellowships.

And congratulations on the child's start in the medical career. The best.

Last edited by theoldnorthstate; 05-23-2014 at 11:22 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 11:09 AM
 
5,397 posts, read 6,540,598 times
Reputation: 10472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I have long been of the opinion that most people who claim to have a great doctor really haven't the faintest idea whether that doctor is good, bad, or indifferent. What they mean is they LIKE their doctor - he somehow makes them feel good psychologically.

Any large, teaching hospital is almost certain to be a good one. There is tremendous snobbism at work with people convincing themselves that their hospital and/or their doctor is such hot stuff.

Hospitals which specialize in rare conditions/diseases may well be the exception. If one has that rare condition/disease, then a hospital specializing in it may be truly superior.

I have never quite understood the attitude/expectation that we are going to be very sick/have medical emergencies and therefore we need to plan our retirement around proximity to a large hospital. Most of the population of the United States lives in urban and suburban areas, not out in the boonies somewhere. Therefore most of us live in close proximity to good medical care - by definition.

What's all the worry and agonizing about? It seems to me to be some sort of anxiety disorder.
Fail ER, no anxiety disorder.

As North Carolinians which is a state of extremes, my sister and I were discussing retirement locations and she favors going back into the homeland mountains believing that the quality of specialists if needed would sort themselves out in a normal distribution. And I having seen how hard the kids work to become doctors of specialty wonder if these same young doctors would want to have retirees, lower income people, and the occasional wealthy second home person as their client base thereby paying off debt and building wealth more slowly. Where as I was thinking the better ones would want to be near research or well known teaching/medical areas (e.g. Duke, Wake Forest, etc) where they could be financially rewarded sooner and challenged by the research or learning environment.

But I can see where your geographical environment might cause you to read my question from your perspective.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 11:24 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,966,925 times
Reputation: 18050
I don't think it hard to find the rating of best medical facilities with top rated doctors in this country. Of course they attract the best doctors in their field. many are only ones that are allowed to do the latest procedures. if you ever go to one to visit patient or have a relative in one the professionalism and staff care is quite evident ;IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 12:14 PM
 
14,261 posts, read 24,004,620 times
Reputation: 20081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I have long been of the opinion that most people who claim to have a great doctor really haven't the faintest idea whether that doctor is good, bad, or indifferent. What they mean is they LIKE their doctor - he somehow makes them feel good psychologically.

Any large, teaching hospital is almost certain to be a good one. There is tremendous snobbism at work with people convincing themselves that their hospital and/or their doctor is such hot stuff.

Hospitals which specialize in rare conditions/diseases may well be the exception. If one has that rare condition/disease, then a hospital specializing in it may be truly superior.

I have never quite understood the attitude/expectation that we are going to be very sick/have medical emergencies and therefore we need to plan our retirement around proximity to a large hospital. Most of the population of the United States lives in urban and suburban areas, not out in the boonies somewhere. Therefore most of us live in close proximity to good medical care - by definition.

What's all the worry and agonizing about? It seems to me to be some sort of anxiety disorder.


First, I would GENERALLY agree that the average patient has no real basis to evaluate their physician as we lack the knowledge of what constitutes the standards of care. However, I would say that it is extremely important to find a doctor who listens and can adequately communicate to you about your health. Patients generally are more open to medical personnel that they feel comfortable with. Many medical schools are now paying member of the general public to evaluate how medical students come across to patients.

Second, I have worked in a number of teaching hospitals and a number of community hospitals. I strongly prefer the latter as you are treated by physicians that know you and have worked with you for years. In the large teaching hospitals, you have so many medical students that often you get a lack of continuity of care. In my local hospital, I know the doctors, many of the nurses from prior visits. I am not saying that there is not a place for the Northwesterns and the Medical College of Virginia or Mass General and the like. However, they are not for me.

Third, there are a lot of us with chronic conditions who need access to medical care fairly quickly. Moving to some hamlet in Costa Rica two hours away from a city is just not an option. And the quality of health care does vary substantially across the country. I think that people who live in Chicago or LA or Detroit of Cleveland take health care availability for granted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
First, I would GENERALLY agree that the average patient has no real basis to evaluate their physician as we lack the knowledge of what constitutes the standards of care. However, I would say that it is extremely important to find a doctor who listens and can adequately communicate to you about your health. Patients generally are more open to medical personnel that they feel comfortable with. Many medical schools are now paying member of the general public to evaluate how medical students come across to patients.

Second, I have worked in a number of teaching hospitals and a number of community hospitals. I strongly prefer the latter as you are treated by physicians that know you and have worked with you for years. In the large teaching hospitals, you have so many medical students that often you get a lack of continuity of care. In my local hospital, I know the doctors, many of the nurses from prior visits. I am not saying that there is not a place for the Northwesterns and the Medical College of Virginia or Mass General and the like. However, they are not for me.

Third, there are a lot of us with chronic conditions who need access to medical care fairly quickly. Moving to some hamlet in Costa Rica two hours away from a city is just not an option. And the quality of health care does vary substantially across the country. I think that people who live in Chicago or LA or Detroit of Cleveland take health care availability for granted.
I agree with a large part of what you are saying, except that personally I'll take the teaching hospitals because my level of confidence is higher. And yes, I myself take health care availability for granted, being that I live in one of the places you listed. Further I assume you used those four places as examples, not as a complete listing. My point was and remains that most people in the United States live in places like the examples and can therefore take health care availability for granted; we no longer have much of a rural population in this country as was the case before World War II.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top