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Old 05-28-2014, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
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Here's a related question: What do you think about "doorless" bedrooms? A friend of mine lives alone in a smallish 3-bedroom ranch and the only rooms that have doors are the two bathrooms. When you come in the front door there is a short hallway and then an opening to the living room; just past the living room is the dining room and if you make a right turn in the dining room you walk into the kitchen and from there, around a corner into the family room. The side hallway (with one bathroom plus the washer/dryer and entrance to the garage) is at that end of the house too.

If instead of walking into the dining room from the front door, you make a right turn, that's the hallway where the 3 bedrooms and the other bathroom are. The bedroom closest to the living room/dining room is set up as a computer room, lined with bookshelves. She took the doors off the closet and put bookshelves in there too. The second bedroom was converted into a closet (I think it's 10x10 or 10x11); its doorway is directly across from the "master" bedroom which is the only one actually used as a bedroom. It had a closet but she needed to fit more furniture in the room so had the closet removed. No door on the bedroom or closet room either.

She likes the extra wall space that is available because of not having the doors, and says that since she lives alone there's no reason for the doors to be there. She does worry about resale if she ever has to sell the house, though, because people expect doors on every room apparantly!
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,393,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post

. No door on the bedroom or closet room either.

She likes the extra wall space that is available because of not having the doors, and says that since she lives alone there's no reason for the doors to be there. She does worry about resale if she ever has to sell the house, though, because people expect doors on every room apparently!
I would need doors on all BRs, regardless of what they're used for. Think of the case where someone breaks into the house and you need to get where there is a lockable door (not the bathroom). This may sound paranoid but~~~hey~~~.

Also, if the other BRs are used for other things, where do guests sleep - they would want a door.


And, close a door and hide the mess of a hobby room, etc...or hide private papers of an office set up. No doors would affect resale unless they can be readily added.
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,892,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
I would need doors on all BRs, regardless of what they're used for. Think of the case where someone breaks into the house and you need to get where there is a lockable door (not the bathroom). This may sound paranoid but~~~hey~~~.

Also, if the other BRs are used for other things, where do guests sleep - they would want a door.


And, close a door and hide the mess of a hobby room, etc...or hide private papers of an office set up. No doors would affect resale unless they can be readily added.
I agree, that would not fly. I want doors on the bedrooms
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
Reputation: 1046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
Also, if the other BRs are used for other things, where do guests sleep - they would want a door.

And, close a door and hide the mess of a hobby room, etc...or hide private papers of an office set up. No doors would affect resale unless they can be readily added.
LOL, one of the big reasons my friend set up the bedrooms' use this way is because she didn't want to ever have overnight guests! ;-) (a sentiment with which I wholeheartedly agree; I went one step further and eliminated the dining room ... turned it into my computer room... so that I have an excuse for not having to host holidays or gatherings again, lol.)

Though I have to say, I've never seen her house in anything other than magazine-layout condition. She's a neatfreak par excellence. If she does have "messes", I'm sure nobody but she ever lays eyes on them. :-)
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:17 AM
 
1,770 posts, read 2,443,375 times
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I dislike open floor plans for a number of reasons:

I think they are almost barbaric (hey how about that pit fire in the middle of our cave or Hogan?)

I can't hide a mess where as multiple rooms allow for such things.

In a strategic sense, not having separate rooms with lockable doors isn't safe in event of a home intrusion. Where do you run quickly as your "safe place".

The LAST thing I want are guests watching me cook or seeing dirty pots, pans, etc while they are eating. And what if you drop something and decide to pick it up and serve it ( ha ha!!) .

A thought: If narrow doors and sharp turns are an issue for folks with walkers, etc, if you are so fortunate or able to do it, expand/construct all interior doors 36". It is easier to move furniture around also.

But hey, to each their own.
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:25 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,871,258 times
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Love open floor plans. Only wish for our house now is that it was more open. One son has open floor plan and we love it.
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,892,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LivingDeadGirl View Post
I dislike open floor plans for a number of reasons:

I think they are almost barbaric (hey how about that pit fire in the middle of our cave or Hogan?)

I can't hide a mess where as multiple rooms allow for such things.

In a strategic sense, not having separate rooms with lockable doors isn't safe in event of a home intrusion. Where do you run quickly as your "safe place".

The LAST thing I want are guests watching me cook or seeing dirty pots, pans, etc while they are eating. And what if you drop something and decide to pick it up and serve it ( ha ha!!) .

A thought: If narrow doors and sharp turns are an issue for folks with walkers, etc, if you are so fortunate or able to do it, expand/construct all interior doors 36". It is easier to move furniture around also.

But hey, to each their own.
Most interior doors in a home of average budget can be kicked in by one good kick from a man. it may afford you a few seconds lead time to dial 911 if you have your phone handy. Unless you have a fortress type room like in that movie with Jodi Foster there really isn't a "safe" place in the average home during a home invasion
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack_pine View Post
My neighbors in WI just furnished a house with garage floor same level as house. I will ask him this weekend how he got it past the code guy.
A house and a garage on the same level, is against code?



Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
... First the idea of open floor plan is awesome. You can do so much with it. Also as you get older the freedom of movement as many have said is great. Second the kitchen needs to have a window that is very important. As one mentioned a basement not necessarily a full basement but at least some place to go in tornados stocked with some supplies.
Or live in a region that is free from tornadoes.



Quote:
... Hardwood floors are key and going on with that for me is heated floors. Yes you guys down south say I wont need it but I believe that I will. I like it especially in the bedroom where stepping out of bed in a cool winter you dont feel a cold floor under foot.
We have radiant heated flooring, it is nice. It is also a highly efficient method of home heating.

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Old 05-28-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by LivingDeadGirl View Post
I dislike open floor plans for a number of reasons:

I think they are almost barbaric (hey how about that pit fire in the middle of our cave or Hogan?)
We have a sunken living room. Four long bench-seat couches face inwards, with four sets of steps leading down into it [one set of steps in each corner]. In the center is an open-hearth fire-pit. That small bit of floor down in the living room is radiant heated, along with the seating and the seat backs, they all have radiant heat installed.



Quote:
... In a strategic sense, not having separate rooms with lockable doors isn't safe in event of a home intrusion. Where do you run quickly as your "safe place".
I am not good at running.

If an intruder kicks his way through our steel doors, he might as well call out what caliber of ammo he wants to be fired at him.



Quote:
... The LAST thing I want are guests watching me cook or seeing dirty pots, pans, etc while they are eating. And what if you drop something and decide to pick it up and serve it ( ha ha!!) .
We host a monthly potluck here. Our dining area, is in our kitchen.
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Old 05-28-2014, 11:06 AM
 
20,136 posts, read 11,167,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Most interior doors in a home of average budget can be kicked in by one good kick from a man. it may afford you a few seconds lead time to dial 911 if you have your phone handy. Unless you have a fortress type room like in that movie with Jodi Foster there really isn't a "safe" place in the average home during a home invasion
Zero doors at all means that a burglar can wander into the bedroom even if he did not intend to, even if he was only looking for the family room where the electronics are.

And there is nothing wrong with a few more seconds to dial 911. It's not difficult to install a solid core door and fortify the lock as well.
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