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Old 06-04-2014, 05:01 PM
 
13,313 posts, read 25,542,533 times
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Many of us, maybe at least some of us, don't have any family to consider. I'm fine with that, but have always kept the lack of safety net in back of my mind. OK, in the front quite often.
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Old 06-04-2014, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,537 posts, read 9,934,569 times
Reputation: 9051
Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
I looked at Healthcare.gov.....my insurance would be ~ 858/month! I 'make' too much money.
Even after you quit your job?
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Old 06-04-2014, 07:42 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,183 posts, read 1,338,732 times
Reputation: 6286
Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
I looked at Healthcare.gov.....my insurance would be ~ 858/month! I 'make' too much money.
After you stop working you won't be making so much money.
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Old 06-04-2014, 09:46 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,527 posts, read 39,903,732 times
Reputation: 23634
AND... you also won't need TAX credits, the way ACA 'supposedly' gives you a 'good' deal,

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Old 06-05-2014, 03:09 PM
 
2,626 posts, read 4,948,496 times
Reputation: 2220
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Many of us, maybe at least some of us, don't have any family to consider. I'm fine with that, but have always kept the lack of safety net in back of my mind. OK, in the front quite often.
I don't have any family to consider. I am on my own! I did take care of my elderly mother after my father passed away. I was happy to do so. She lived in her own place but I took her places, ran errands for her and cared for her when she got lung cancer.
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Old 06-06-2014, 04:32 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,964,817 times
Reputation: 15649
There is "retirement from a career," and complete retirement. Just because we retire from a long-held career doesn't mean we have to stop working if we don't want to. There is always some way to keep working on some level. I don't understand why someone who is quite well-off worries so much about retiring sooner than later.
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,603 posts, read 1,269,897 times
Reputation: 3016
Retire from that job and never look back. Retirement is sweet!
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:34 AM
 
34,355 posts, read 41,427,648 times
Reputation: 29841
Quote:
Originally Posted by Littlelu View Post
Retire from that job and never look back. Retirement is sweet!
That rational is not a given, for some retirement is a journey into boredom, irrelevance and poor health coupled with potential financial problems.
However if the OP has it planned and well thought out go for the retirement..
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Old 06-06-2014, 11:11 AM
 
3,934 posts, read 3,257,479 times
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Many in the working class saw retirement as a far away thing when they were young, but as they aged the reality of working oneself into an exhausted state became the focus of the reason we retire. One poster on this forum, a young worker, seems to harbor a peculiar disdain for what he sees as us oldies "hogging" the jobs we should have (in his opinion) left. Whether his views are valid or not It is a reality that our youth need jobs, if we can aid in them becoming employed we should.

One particularly depressing thing we hear is the refrain of fear and loathing associated with the stopping of work, boredom, as though boredom isn't the driving force in so many creative endeavors, poor health can be a real problem but again, having a good outlook does wonders for the entire body not to mention the benefit of brightening your mental health.

Go now, retire, and just be, sleep in for a few weeks, it'll give you the proper perspective on just what having your own time means. Get out in the community, coffee shops, bars that have an older crowd, groups, the "meetups" online that cater to every interest, make invitations and never turn down invitations, smile, a lot.
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Old 06-06-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,603 posts, read 1,269,897 times
Reputation: 3016
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
That rational is not a given, for some retirement is a journey into boredom, irrelevance and poor health coupled with potential financial problems.
However if the OP has it planned and well thought out go for the retirement..
It's just my advice and I always look at the positive angle on everything!
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