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Old 06-06-2014, 04:10 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,251,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
That obit is awesome. I know my wife probably would try to write something but I think my daughter would be better and she would get recruited. Maybe I should leave some notes and a draft outline?
My Mom left notes - things she wanted mentioned. Some of it didn't make any sense to me and my brother, but what Mom wanted, Mom got. We only had to change the number of great-great-grandchildren. Actually made it easier at that stressful time.
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Old 06-06-2014, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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Here in Canada, obituaries generally contain requests for donations, in lieu of flowers, to a favourite charity, and in many cases that is a clue to the cause of death. Thanks to medical staff, for their care and professional empathy, and again, donations are encouraged to the medical facility.

Photos of the deceased are common, but recently I have noticed a trend of using photos from an earlier stage of the person's life. Kind of odd, when the person is in their 80's but the photo is from their University days ?

Cause of death can some times be deduced from the use of certain phrases, such as "passed suddenly " or with out warning, which can indicate either a suicide, or a accidental death, such as a car accident. "after a long battle ' is usually a case of a person being ill for a long time.

Jim B.

Toronto.
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Old 06-06-2014, 05:48 PM
 
3,438 posts, read 4,742,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Here in Canada, obituaries generally contain requests for donations, in lieu of flowers, to a favourite charity, and in many cases that is a clue to the cause of death. Thanks to medical staff, for their care and professional empathy, and again, donations are encouraged to the medical facility.

Photos of the deceased are common, but recently I have noticed a trend of using photos from an earlier stage of the person's life. Kind of odd, when the person is in their 80's but the photo is from their University days ?

Cause of death can some times be deduced from the use of certain phrases, such as "passed suddenly " or with out warning, which can indicate either a suicide, or a accidental death, such as a car accident. "after a long battle ' is usually a case of a person being ill for a long time.

Jim B.

Toronto.

the same here in the states of the obits I read.
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Old 06-06-2014, 05:52 PM
 
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A nice obit I read was of a retired farmer. He and his wife had no children.

The facts were there and it stated when his wife died 4 years ago he moved to town.

.." Daily he would have his meals at Hillcrest Café, stop at Rookies Bar to socialize with a few friends, and never missed an episode of Judge Judy"

Not a bad way to spend the day or your retirement.
It made him content with life.
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Old 06-06-2014, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,977 posts, read 5,326,543 times
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I like to read the obits. Some people had fascinating lives. A month ago I read an Amish obit. She left 351 children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. Their spouses would put it over 500.

I read the ones in my hometown papers since I know so many people there. I still get surprised when I read someone's that I thought I knew and find out something new.
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:30 PM
 
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What I find interesting is the things listed that I never knew.

One older farmer was not in the war ( entered the Army in 47) but it stated he was an instructor in the paratroopers.
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Old 06-07-2014, 04:09 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,693 posts, read 40,062,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teddy52 View Post
What I find interesting is the things listed that I never knew.

One older farmer was not in the war ( entered the Army in 47) but it stated he was an instructor in the paratroopers.
Yeah, I like to hear the details that I never knew (whether in Obit or memorial) I often use an earlier pic when posting an obit to a location where the deceased spent their youth, then left for the remainder of their life. For those that remain healthy, a recent photo can be nice memory. (As in the case of a great friend aged 96 who just passed). He had the biggest smile, and a was in the woods, (posing near a tree)where everyone knew he loved to be!

Some obits are very informational, a very nice one I enjoyed was written as from the deceased, thanking his friends and family. It was very indicative of the person and their love for others.


I would like to hear more stories of 'Road trips' with the deceased (enroute to service or burial)! They can be fun and memorable as well! I did 2000 miles with my dad. we went to all his favorite places along the way! I have only a few friends who have done this, but it can be a healing and helpful time together. (finally...in the case of troubled relationships, that didn't have the ability to heal in 'real-life')
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Old 06-07-2014, 07:32 AM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,592 posts, read 12,360,452 times
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I confess I do have a streak of morbidity in me. I like learning about people's deaths. However, I do not subscribe to the local newspaper, The Philadelphia Inquirer, ("The Inky").

Rather, I prefer to browse Findagrave.com which is like an online cemetery with wonderful memorials created by friends and family which includes short biographies of the deceased and usually pictures of the person and their grave monument (if they have one). These memorials are not as formal and a bit more detailed than a newspaper obit. If you have never seen this site ... check it out! You can even leave a picture of flowers, bouquets, a candle, a starry night, and of course comments under the memorial page. Naturally I created beautiful memorials for my Mom, my Dad, my best friend, and others.

I also like to stroll through real cemeteries ... the older the better! I love looking at the grave stones and determining how old people lived. A discovery I made - this is news to no one - that poorer people did not live as long as richer people. The folks buried in the Palmer Street Burial Ground in a very industrial working poor neighborhood of modest row-homes (I understand it was set up to provide a free burial plot to anyone who can prove the deceased lived in that immediate neighborhood - in the 19th Century) usually lived to be in their 40' s and 50' s. Lots of little children buried there. Near my house is the historic beautiful Victorian cemetery The Woodlands. Many distinguished people buried there - Civil War generals and admirals, industrialists like the uber-wealthy Drexel banking family, artists like Thomas Eakins and Rembrandt Peale, doctors like Samuel David Gross, Mr. Campbell who founded Campbell's soup, etc. These 19th Century privileged folks seem to live "normal" lifespans in their 70' s and 80's. No doubt they had access to good medical care.
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Old 06-07-2014, 08:54 AM
 
13,346 posts, read 25,607,620 times
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I loved the Inquirer when I lived in that area!
Dunno about "good medical care." Maybe better diet, cleaner water, cleaner environment (ventilation, no sewage, etc.). There just wasn't that much medical care per se available back then.
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Old 06-07-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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Yesterday, June the sixth, was the 70 year anniversary of the D Day landings in Normandy.

The Toronto Star news paper, ran a full page obituary, of ALL the members of the Queens Own Rifles ( a Toronto based Canadian Army unit that landed in the first wave at Juno Beach on June sixth ) that were killed that day, with photos of each man. At no cost.

The Montreal Gazette did the same thing, for the Fusiliers Mont Royal, and the Winnipeg Free Press did the same thing for the Winnipeg Rifles Regiment. The Vancouver Sun did the same thing for the Seaforth Highlanders, who were raised in the Vancouver area.

The Canadian Army recruited units from specific locations, with in a Province, so when, for instance the Loyal Edmonton Regiment suffered heavy casualties, at Ortona, in Italy, the city was hard hit. That practice also contributed to strong unit loyalty, as many men knew each other from school, or sports teams that they had played on , together. Many of the men who volunteered in 1939, had been members of the reserve, all through the depression, even though they got no pay, only street car tickets to get to the Armoury, for training nights.

Lest We Forget.

Jim B.

Toronto.
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