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Old 06-14-2014, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,967 posts, read 14,442,747 times
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As I have posted in other threads, we moved from the St. Louis area to Vancouver, WA to be closer to grown kids and grands. It seemed to us that we needed to be closer to our kids as we got older. As it was, we were a long plane ride away from them, and this might prove to be burdensome if one of us had a health emergency. What we've found is that we actually help them from time to time. We baby sit and we pick up one of the grands from school once a week. The time we spend together, doing nothing much, is very precious to both of us.

And, I get to see my own kids more often. I had come to miss them, and we had only been seeing them once or twice a year.

The move has turned out well for us. We are living in a slightly more expensive part of the country than before, but we are getting along pretty well anyway. We have a suitable house, and I've worked to make it feel serene and happy for us and for visitors. I miss my old friends, my old newspaper, my old church, my old supermarket. But there are compensations.

I know we made the right decision when my young grand comes to me and climbs into my lap. There is nothing like that in the world. And I am a lucky, lucky person.
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Old 06-15-2014, 01:03 AM
 
6,555 posts, read 3,107,016 times
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Originally Posted by travric View Post
Speaking of 'health', I thought it interesting that the posts here didn't even discuss health-care. Question is did those who moved already know about the medical facilities and didn't have to research? In any case I guess things worked out along that subject since I didn't see comments pertaining to it.
We knew generally what was available because I have parents and a sister who have lived here for 15-20 years.

There's a small hospital in town. For years it didn't have a great rep. However, several years ago it was taken over and has improved tremendously.

We've used the emergency room a few times for non life threatening things and my parents have been there a couple of times for more serious things. I also got a correct diagnosis of pneumonia after doctors at a renowned hospital in New York missed the diagnosis a few days earlier and spent a week there. I got excellent care and opted to stay there even though I could have gone to one of the larger facilities with better reps 30 minutes and hour or two hours away.

My family has already pretty much scoped out all the primary care, dentists, opthamologists, urologists, orthopedic and cardiac specialists and know who is good and who should be avoided. And, our primary care doc who is great has no qualms about saying don't go to so and so or don't use the hospital for certain things lol.

There's really only so much research you can to prior to moving unless you have a serious preexisting condition because who knows what you could need. It is important anywhere though imo to ask locals who the best specialists are or their experiences. And, you have to decide if you are able and willing to do the extra travel that may be more than you are used to for treatment. When my father got cancer we opted to get his daily radiation in town because there was a new state of art facility with a highly recommended specialist. His chemo 2-3 times a week, we drove 45 minutes and took all day because we felt the oncologist in a larger city was better. He and my mother would not have been able to do that alone for several months imo. Who knows the results had they opted for a chemo regime in town.

But that scenario is really no different than when I lived in ny. Several times I or a family member went into New York City to get better treatment options than we could get on Long Island. The logistics of that were far more stressful and expensive than doing the same thing here.
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Old 06-16-2014, 10:45 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,529,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travric View Post
Speaking of 'health', I thought it interesting that the posts here didn't even discuss health-care. Question is did those who moved already know about the medical facilities and didn't have to research? In any case I guess things worked out along that subject since I didn't see comments pertaining to it.
For us, researching health care before we made "the move" was a given and while we're rather rural we have excellent health care facilities and services handily available within 25-50 miles.
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Old 06-17-2014, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,815 posts, read 4,862,439 times
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We didn't research healthcare. We are 30 minutes from a decent size city with a teaching hospital and we figured that there would be plenty of docs available.
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Old 06-17-2014, 08:28 PM
 
3,953 posts, read 3,272,898 times
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I retired in 07 from the Seattle area to a small town one hundred miles south, my wife died shortly after we moved into the new house, that things don't always work out the way we plan is now my daily mantra and I'm living my days as though my time is short. Why, because one of the things we don't always take into consideration in retirement is the fact of our age and the odds being on the rise that our demise is very unpredictable. Burying a person you loved for thirty years has a very sobering effect to be sure.

A small town life as the survivor of spousal death isn't an enjoyable one, at 62 I had a fair amount of energy left and used it wisely to pursue those things I couldn't do while I worked, but had I stayed put I think the familiar surroundings would have been a real comfort in those dark times of adjustment. I eventually got married again and now live two hundred miles south of Seattle so I'm still reinventing myself in a new set of circumstances and a new family to boot.

I think that we all could stand to loosen up a bit on those things that have to do with any attempt to be too secure in your life, do what you want, if it doesn't work out move again and don't look back, sooner or later time will have it's way with all of us, and then I doubt that anyone will have any regrets over decisions made in haste, live for the now and you'll find that at the least you will be plenty busy in your life and most likely fully engaged in the lives of others...
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