U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-14-2014, 02:56 PM
 
777 posts, read 3,406,150 times
Reputation: 378

Advertisements

We're in a classic college-dominated city, and while we're not retired, a lot of people in the area are. The appeal: There is a youthful energy, out and about; lots of activities/classes/sports; cheap and interesting restaurants. On the other hand, there is some crime/traffic/noise within a couple miles of campus; not that many professional-level jobs; a little isolated. It wouldn't be for everyone, but you have to retire somewhere.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-14-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,775,806 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Unfortunately, not so in this highly concentrated college area. Rents are quite high due to students/faculty apt sharing. Property taxes are quite high b/c many private colleges do not pay a fair share to the town (and typically there is a low business base), and buying in to these preferred areas is quite pricey. The public school systems here in college towns are supposed to be top rated (though I'm not so sure about that) and thus, of course, much higher property tax (the public school budget is typically 66% of the total town budget each year).
When I wrote "more reasonable cost of housing" the comparison was to vibrant large cities. What I had in mind but did not spell out was in comparison to New York City/Boston/Washington D.C./Los Angeles/Chicago etc. What your post so correctly points out is that everything is relative, i.e., that the cost of housing in some college towns can be relatively high.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,535 posts, read 8,798,907 times
Reputation: 12243
Party on, dudes. I'm all for it. College Station, TX, Corvallis, or Eugene, OR (or will it be North Adams, MA?) here i come!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 05:35 PM
 
3,491 posts, read 5,679,966 times
Reputation: 1701
I plan on retiring in the Austin, Texas area which is home to the University of Texas.....one of the reasons is Longhorns football so its a plus for me.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 06:49 PM
 
266 posts, read 231,684 times
Reputation: 473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knightly Knight View Post
I can't speak for other college towns, Princeton, is not the norm,
I lived in Princeton for several years, and it never really felt like a college town. Nassau street had a lot going for it, but most of it seemed like the kind of stores rich older people would shop at (with a couple exceptions, of course).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 06:58 PM
 
2,982 posts, read 2,714,296 times
Reputation: 5631
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I would not want to live in most state University towns. In some, the loud student parties, riots, and driving up rents and property values is a big negative. I would find (and have found) a private college town that is sedate with a lovely campus like a park (where I can walk year-round), and I can audit classes and use the pool. If you're considering moving to a U-town, visit it on a Fri or Sat night.


You must have found Williamstown, MA.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 07:02 PM
 
2,982 posts, read 2,714,296 times
Reputation: 5631
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knightly Knight View Post
I can't speak for other college towns, Princeton, is not the norm, small school with good, smart kids, Historic Downtown Princeton, an "Ivy league" school and is a game changer, soft quite nights, great weekends out on deck sipping red wine, very scenic, rolling hills, wooded acres, our Museum is one of the finest in the world,McCarter Theatre, great acts, the scenic back drops, Nassau street, fantastic restaurants, centrally located between Philadelphia and New York, happy to call it home.

PS-My neighbors house, or maybe I should call it their castle, has tunnels that leave their home and pops up at the edge of the tree line, that dates back to the Revolutionary war and the battle of Princeton. lol. Simply fantastic ...


Princeton would be the perfect town to retire to, halfway between NY and Philadelphia, but the property taxes in Princeton and the surrounding area are beyond outrageous, they are a joke on the residents. I guess it is a college town for billionaires to retire in.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 08:36 PM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,865,612 times
Reputation: 7334
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I would not want to live in most state University towns. In some, the loud student parties, riots, and driving up rents and property values is a big negative. I would find (and have found) a private college town that is sedate with a lovely campus like a park (where I can walk year-round), and I can audit classes and use the pool. If you're considering moving to a U-town, visit it on a Fri or Sat night.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdelena View Post
All college towns are not the same but being in an area with heavy student activity can be a real hassle. Choose carefully and avoid areas with 'affordable rentals' and roads with direct access to campus.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
For 16 years I lived in Tallahassee, which is sort of a college town, although it's pretty sizeable at 180,000 people, and it's the state capital, so there is life there beyond Florida State University, Florida A & M University, and Tallahassee Community College. Having said that, I must also add that during football season, nothing else seems to matter but that week's game.

I wouldn't want to live in a college town so small that the college was basically all there was to the town, and everyone either was a student or an employee or an alumnus(a) of the college. I'd rather live in a medium-size city that has things to offer and also has one or more universities or colleges nearby.
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I think it depends on the person. I wouldn't because I do not like the areas around typical colleges. Most businesess around are gear to service them which only makes sense.
I think it depends on which college/university and the size of the town. I'd say thumbs down where we
are. Yes, there are bars, restaurants and activities however they are geared towards students.
The housing stock in town is mostly occupied by students as well as apartments and is expensive.
Actually, many of the homes are rentals (except subdivisions) and look like student housing slums.
Be prepared to put up with the "partying." It does quiet down in the summer.
If you plan on working part time or volunteering most positions are filled by students. Since it does
have that youthful vibe and the majority are young people (under 25) that's who you will see
working and volunteering.
Health care is another problem. To be frank, in a smaller university town there are not as many
doctors or specialists and if you do need to find one there may be a long wait or some no longer take
new patients. If you plan on traveling whether by air or train, it can be a hassle (you may have to
drive to a larger city).
Also, the university does not offer any continuing education courses for seniors unless you want to
pay the full credit price.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,486 posts, read 43,879,446 times
Reputation: 47264
excellent medical care is one of the many reasons why we chose Chapel Hill, N.C. if UNC can't handle it then Dook can.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2014, 10:09 PM
 
6,756 posts, read 8,333,210 times
Reputation: 6787
Another vote for college town, but not living in the student neighborhood (and a town large enough that this is an easy option).
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top