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Old 06-15-2014, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,886 posts, read 2,304,198 times
Reputation: 5327

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I have spent time in several college towns in different areas of the country. What I have found that is common in all those locations:

Drugs and drug pushers are easy to find.
Forget about parking your car in the street (no parking any where)'.
College kids throwing up on the street corners.
Tattoo parlors on every block.
Pizza parlors on every block.
Daily car accidents.
Quick shops every where.
Bars every where.
Quick shops, grocery stores all sell whiskey, vodka, ginn and condoms.
At night you can hear music coming from all directions and you can hear kids screaming and yelling at all hours.
Prostitution (yes I have been approached by girls saying that they need tuition money).

I was staying at a hotel in Madison Wisconsin on the 5th floor and had trouble sleeping because the hotel had been invaded by 20 somethings that were drunk, screaming, yelling and outside my door all night. I went down stairs and the whole hobby was full of drunk college kids. I just had to put up with it.

No way in hell do I want to retire to a college town!
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Old 06-15-2014, 06:01 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,196 posts, read 2,865,272 times
Reputation: 4901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garthur View Post
I have spent time in several college towns in different areas of the country.

I was staying at a hotel in Madison Wisconsin on the 5th floor and had trouble sleeping because the hotel had been invaded by 20 somethings that were drunk, screaming, yelling and outside my door all night. I went down stairs and the whole hobby was full of drunk college kids. I just had to put up with it.

No way in hell do I want to retire to a college town!
Wondering if they were Nebraska Husker team supporters there for a Big 10 game....
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Old 06-15-2014, 06:06 PM
 
1,472 posts, read 1,351,276 times
Reputation: 1167
Default I lived in State College, Pa ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
I've noted with interest how many times people have mentioned a desire to retire to a "college town" and began to wonder what the attraction (or conversely, repulsion LOL) of a college town would be for a retiree.

On one hand, I can imagine that someone might enjoy the activity, vibrancy and "youthful exuberance" of an area that is home to many college students during most of the year.

On the other hand, I can also imagine that the prospect of an overabundance of rental housing stuffed with partying students, half (or mostly) drunk and/or particularly distracted drivers on the roadways especially weekends and breaks, and just an overall higher level of noise and commotion for most of the year, could be someone's worst nightmare. (frankly, that would be me, LOL)

So what do you personally think of college towns as a retirement destination: Thumbs up, or thumbs down?

Thumbs down for me, obviously.
... and found that you can't go home again. If you no longer are relevant and have out lived your class what's the point?
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Old 06-15-2014, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,886 posts, read 2,304,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Wondering if they were Nebraska Husker team supporters there for a Big 10 game....
It gets pretty crazy in Lincoln too. Especially during game week ends. I live in between Lincoln and Omaha so I have no reason to stay in Lincoln, I would just go home. All my experience has been at other college towns around the country. My company would send me to professional specialized college classes at least one a year. All managers at my company were required to attend at least one class a year.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:59 PM
 
89 posts, read 97,750 times
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I've had a long career traveling with the Big 12 & the Big Ten, my view is very different. Lincoln's about as peaceful as it gets. Sure, people have fun at sporting events and some fans get unruly. But the sun rises and the campus is peaceful and back to normal. As long as you're not one of the unruly ones, why should it bother you. Just fear the corn, that's all.
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Old 06-15-2014, 10:06 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,742 posts, read 2,558,868 times
Reputation: 9240
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdelena View Post
All college towns are not the same but being in an area with heavy student activity can be a real hassle. Choose carefully and avoid areas with 'affordable rentals' and roads with direct access to campus.
We live close to Stanford and UC Berkeley (both college towns on steroids), so "affordable rentals" (low income housing) is not a concern (except in East Palo Alto, and that's just for the once every 3 years trip to IKEA).

Affording a spacious and executive-style rental or buying a similar type house we'd like in Palo Alto and environs or the Berkeley Hills is the problem. (And that's with significant assets and a very decent income.)

Last edited by SFBayBoomer; 06-15-2014 at 10:18 PM..
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:34 PM
 
12 posts, read 13,431 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
I've noted with interest how many times people have mentioned a desire to retire to a "college town" and began to wonder what the attraction (or conversely, repulsion LOL) of a college town would be for a retiree.

On one hand, I can imagine that someone might enjoy the activity, vibrancy and "youthful exuberance" of an area that is home to many college students during most of the year.

On the other hand, I can also imagine that the prospect of an overabundance of rental housing stuffed with partying students, half (or mostly) drunk and/or particularly distracted drivers on the roadways especially weekends and breaks, and just an overall higher level of noise and commotion for most of the year, could be someone's worst nightmare. (frankly, that would be me, LOL)

So what do you personally think of college towns as a retirement destination: Thumbs up, or thumbs down?

Thumbs down for me, obviously.
YES with Caveat. I have better intellectual rapport with younger people & like the cultural aspects of a really good school. However, I would hate, as you do, living anywhere near a college town. And it would have to be a very good school to offer the kind of ambiance that I seek. So the answer is yes / no
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Old 06-16-2014, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Sinkholeville
1,496 posts, read 1,434,142 times
Reputation: 2323
When I was a college student, I don't remember welcoming any senior citizens to any activities.
I guess they could wander around on alumni day, like tourists.
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Old 06-16-2014, 09:13 AM
 
3,492 posts, read 4,963,974 times
Reputation: 5383
I would prefer to be in a very nice city that has a state university, but is not a college town. A college town, by definition (IMO), is one that is primarily built and focused around some aspect of that college. You would expect these towns to usually have under 100k people. 150k at the max. Beyond that, it stops being feasible to be a college town, unless you have an absolutely enormous college.

Some common (negative) trends of college town:
Housing is significantly over-priced. The cost to build housing there does not match the cost of acquiring or living in that housing. Usually this may be tied into laws that are very beneficial to existing landlords.
Employment options are unattractive to young people, but the unemployment rate is held artificially low by refusing to count students as being unemployed if they don't have enough time to spend applying for jobs they can't get.
There are several young people that enjoy drinking, and they may be more prone to combine it with driving.
Due to their limited size and demographics, they may be less likely to have a Sam's Club or Costco. (If you are shopping at Walmart or Target, you're paying too much for too little)
Due to a growth in "Distance learning", students may be able to avoid living in these areas. Which would solve some of the above problems, but could also cause a sudden, severe, and long term drop in home values for people owning a house there.

On the upside, more education in the general public may occasionally encourage more intelligent voting. Unfortunately, it doesn't always work.
On the upside, they may offer cheap courses to old people. However, those same options might have been available in a much better city for similar costs.
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Old 06-16-2014, 05:03 PM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,860,037 times
Reputation: 7334
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
When I was a college student, I don't remember welcoming any senior citizens to any activities.
I guess they could wander around on alumni day, like tourists.
Well, anyone over 40 here is a senior citizen. That could be another con (in some college towns)
when attending various events (excluding sports).
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