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Old 06-16-2014, 06:29 PM
 
381 posts, read 352,562 times
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When I lived in Houston, I volunteered for many environmental positions: teaching, banding birds, transplanting marsh grasses, controlled burns, etc. Loved it. Moved to Fort Collins (home of Colorado State) and found most of the volunteer jobs were filled by college students trying to build a resume and to make contacts. Didn't blame them, but I ended up with a boring volunteer desk job. Jobs for young people are really hard to come by in Ft. Collins. Side effect of living in a college town.
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Old 06-18-2014, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lastfire View Post
Jobs for young people are really hard to come by in Ft. Collins. Side effect of living in a college town.
Jobs for anyone are hard to come by in many college towns. Mine, for instance, and others I know of have nearly no business base and are not the huge vibrant metros that have tech or healthcare jobs. That's one reason property tax is higher in college towns, that and the fact that if the college is under the umbrella of nonprofit status, it does not contribute to the tax base.
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Old 06-18-2014, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,889,480 times
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Originally Posted by Knightly Knight View Post
I can't speak for other college towns, Princeton, is not the norm, small school with good, smart kids, Historic Downtown Princeton, an "Ivy league" school and is a game changer, soft quite nights, great weekends out on deck sipping red wine, very scenic, rolling hills, wooded acres, our Museum is one of the finest in the world,McCarter Theatre, great acts, the scenic back drops, Nassau street, fantastic restaurants, centrally located between Philadelphia and New York, happy to call it home.

PS-My neighbors house, or maybe I should call it their castle, has tunnels that leave their home and pops up at the edge of the tree line, that dates back to the Revolutionary war and the battle of Princeton. lol. Simply fantastic ...
While I agree on your description, many retirees would not have the budget needed to retire in Princeton.
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Old 06-18-2014, 08:31 AM
 
3,036 posts, read 2,019,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondy View Post
We retired to a college town. The university is very entwined with the town having been established a few years after the town itself. However, there are only 2500 students so its not like they are everywhere. Plus the tuition is almost $40,000/yr and the GPA required to get in is high so the students are pretty serious as opposed to party animals 24/7.

The towns founder established the university to "elevate the culture of the town" and I think it does that to some extent. As others have said, there are lots of cultural events to take advantage of if you are so inclined. Sometimes perception is everything and most people believe that having the college here makes this a better place to live. I think that tends to rub off on things that other people/businesses do in/for the town. It contributes to a civic pride that enhances the town.

The town also has a very active mainstreet/downtown merchants association that works overtime to bring things to the town that keeps the town thriving. The university is very active in this as well. They encourage student involvement and volunteer work in the town. Not sure how this started but the art fairs, food fairs, and other events throughout the year definitely add to the town and keep the downtown alive and thriving rather than having constantly revolving vacant store fronts like you see in some small towns.

They are also a large part of the towns economic engine far beyond the jobs they provide directly. No matter how lean times are they always have money. During the worst part of the recent recession they plowed 20 million into landscaping/ renovations on campus which were done by local businesses. They also recently revived their football program and are leasing a 1930's era stadium from the town as well as some deal for concessions. All told that is expected to bring over 60 million into the towns economy during the next 5-7years. The renovation provided jobs and business to the town at a time it was sorely needed.

I never really notice the students; in fact I have been surprised we don't see more of them. They are required to live on campus for the first three years so their housing is not really an issue. The seniors and grads who live off campus all live mostly in the same area by the school so if they have rowdy parties it only bothers other students. I never hear anyone complain and the locals are raking in rent from them so they don't complain.

They have a few bars that are mostly student hangouts. You don't see much of them at the nicer bars/restaurants in town unless their parents are in town treating them lol. And, if they drive(again I think they are not allowed cars the first two years) they usually go to the beach or a larger town nearby to clubs. There really is no issue with student DUI's or accidents.

There are rentals and owner occupied homes at all price points here so I don't think they have much affect except in the housing by the University. Recently, the college bought an old motel and they are renovating what was basically an eyesore into more student housing.

I cant really find any disadvantages related to the college and I see lots of pluses. It simply would not be the same town without the university.
Lol, I NEED to know what town this is!
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Old 06-18-2014, 07:19 PM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,852,122 times
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I would too, but I would have to investigate.
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Old 06-19-2014, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Sinkholeville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonchalance View Post
Lol, I NEED to know what town this is!
Faber College



"Knowledge Is Good"


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Old 06-19-2014, 09:01 PM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,852,122 times
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Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
"Knowledge Is Good"

http://savh3.com/images/belushi-sideways1.jpg
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,924 posts, read 989,259 times
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I wonder if the person who messaged me made their visit to Tennessee. I can't find the message.

I sent them a warning about July in Tennessee, and then we had a cool, pleasant 4th and record cool daytime temps other days this month. We've had plenty of rain and everything is green.

I wanted to tell you that this is not "normal".
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Old 07-21-2014, 07:15 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,679 posts, read 2,226,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
I wonder if the person who messaged me made their visit to Tennessee. I can't find the message.

I sent them a warning about July in Tennessee, and then we had a cool, pleasant 4th and record cool daytime temps other days this month. We've had plenty of rain and everything is green.

I wanted to tell you that this is not "normal".
I think I am to one you are referring to. We are heading up to Cookeville next week. It looks like the temperatures there are still going to be pleasant. We will be leaving behind highs in the mid 90s and rain almost every day here in central Florida.
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Old 07-26-2014, 09:43 PM
 
82 posts, read 97,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post


I think I answered this in another thread long long ago.

I worked at a college. Trash. Noise. Illegal parking. No way would I want to retire near one.
Not all colleges or universities are that way. I've worked at 3 universities, and overall the environment was vibrant, tolerant and full of culture and activities. We're relocating from Long Island to just outside Chapel Hill (also not far from Duke), and look forward to all the area has to offer - very much like living near a city, but not right in the center.
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