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Old 06-16-2014, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
Reputation: 6716

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
Unfortunately, UHC does not offer the High-Deductible Plan F where I live, and that's the only Medigap that I would be able to afford for at least the next two years (maybe longer)... if I can even afford one at all until then, which is a distinct possibility. There are only 4 companies offering the Hi-D Plan F here; the premiums are $64, $93, $116 and $144 respectively.

The worry for a Medigap is not cancellation or non-renewal (they cannot do that as long as you pay your premiums) but if you want to change to a different letter type of policy - even within the same company - they have the right to refuse you if you live anywhere else but in those five states. Your FIL wasn't trying to change his coverage... he was only changing his location, and that's why his health wasn't a problem. It's when you change coverage that insurability becomes an issue with the Medigaps.

That's why the Medicare site says that if you want to change coverage (or have a lapse of coverage of more than 63 days) after the 6-month initial enrollment period "you may not be able to get a policy". That is true everywhere in the USA except in the guaranteed-issue states.
OK - got it. FWIW - UHC doesn't offer its High Deductible Plan F here either. OTOH - when my father inquired about changing from one UHC plan to another - it only needed 3 "no" answers to make a change. Basically - have you ever had cancer - heart problems - or a stroke. Also note that Medigap prices are all over the place in terms of where one lives. Here - I'm paying $176 for the "full" Plan F (the policy would cost 40% more in south Florida).

Sorry to take the thread OT. And good luck in your search. Robyn
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Florida
19,810 posts, read 19,905,205 times
Reputation: 23215
Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post

A big gamechanger for me was the discovery last week that only 5 states have permanent guaranteed issue rights for Medigap policies (NY being one of them). This is a huge factor for me because in any other state I would almost certainly be turned down for a Medigap policy

Btw, the entire middle class on LI is overtaxed and underfunded, no matter what their age LOL
Have you read about when you can switch without being declined?
One is
"Changing Medigap plans if you move out of your Medigap plan's service area"

and even then, some companies allow switching with just a waiting period.
"After switching Medicare supplement plans, you might have to wait to be covered for some benefits. If you have a pre-existing condition, (assuming the insurer allowed you to make the switch), you might have to wait to be covered for expenses associated with that condition."
Switching Medigap Policies - What You Should Know

I figure even if I can never switch from HD F, I'd rather pay the potential worst-case couple hundred extra a year than not move where I wanted.
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Old 06-17-2014, 02:15 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,234,579 times
Reputation: 14870
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I don't mind a simple comment or being handed a book ("you may find this interesting"). It's the constant yammering from several that just doesn't quit. I'm considering veering away from a very long friendship with this one friend. She has gotten "worse" every year as she has aged. She apparently has lots of longtime friends and I would bet the bank that she does the same thing to them, as she talks to me about them all the time and how they could fix their this and that. I'm worn down.
Have you ever just looked her straight in the eyes and said, "Enough!" ?
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Glenbogle
730 posts, read 1,027,552 times
Reputation: 1046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
it only needed 3 "no" answers to make a change. Basically - have you ever had cancer -
That's the question that kicks me out of the acceptability ballpark because I can't answer No to that one.

A catch-22 is that if a person happens to have one of the AARP/UHC plans, then moves and wants to switch plans... they're likely still going to be in the company's service area because AARP/UHC is essentially nationwide. So guaranteed issue would not apply in that case.

The companies that don't use medical underwriting are always the ones with the higher/highest premiums.

old_cold, very true about balancing the extra cost of keeping an original plan against the upsides of moving. That's why I haven't ENTIRELY written off CT as an option even though they're not a guaranteed issue state, in case I can't find what I want within NY, MA or NJ (in that order).
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Old 06-18-2014, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Have you ever just looked her straight in the eyes and said, "Enough!" ?
I have, to no avail: "I don't want to hear about this anymore." Next time we're together, same old.

In the past few years she's developed the habit of "talking over" me, saying something exactly at the same time I do esp when I attempt make a point (or a defense, lol). She holds a professional job so I don't know how this plays out at her work. She's one type, the type that never let's up, repeats over and over and pries about this and that. On the other hand she IS kind and generous and can be fun to be with, though less and less over the past few years. I guess we are, sadly, growing apart.

But then there's the other type who don't repeat themselves, who simply say something ominous that is tough to shake once heard. "You're going to be really sorry if you get another dog." "If you move away from family and friends you're going to really regret it." "If you don't give up gluten foods you're going to get really sick" etc etc. Maybe there's some truth in some of this, but it's the busybody authoritative tone that gets to me. I would say, instead: "Maybe think about a second dog at your age"—if anything.
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Old 06-18-2014, 03:49 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,304,137 times
Reputation: 7523
and the winner is-

'You're entitled to your opinion. Not that it will change anything."

Seriously, people like that are like two year olds, they like the sound of their own voice.

I would just zone out until it dawned on them I wasn't listenning until I got the inevitable 'Didn't you hear what I said?'

'Huh? What?'

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Old 06-18-2014, 08:46 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,172,097 times
Reputation: 22373
I don't spend time around people who offer continual unsolicited advice.

I run from people who think it is their right to examine my life and criticize how I conduct myself or what choices I have made.

I don't have anyone in my life who gives me unsolicited advice, except my hubby, lol. And that is different, of course.

I do have several friends whose advice I seek. They would never "intrude" and when they do offer advice, it is because I have asked for their opinions or thoughts. We would never have enjoyed a long association if either of us were apt to offer unsolicited advice (or criticism). I don't enjoy being around that type of person and my friends tend to be the same way . . . we commiserate, we laugh and cry together, we discuss our lives but we don't feel the need to manage one another -- and that is what I consider bullying me with opinions, advice and criticism . . . an attempt at management and control.
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Old 06-19-2014, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I have, to no avail: "I don't want to hear about this anymore." Next time we're together, same old.

In the past few years she's developed the habit of "talking over" me, saying something exactly at the same time I do esp when I attempt make a point (or a defense, lol). She holds a professional job so I don't know how this plays out at her work. She's one type, the type that never let's up, repeats over and over and pries about this and that. On the other hand she IS kind and generous and can be fun to be with, though less and less over the past few years. I guess we are, sadly, growing apart.

But then there's the other type who don't repeat themselves, who simply say something ominous that is tough to shake once heard. "You're going to be really sorry if you get another dog." "If you move away from family and friends you're going to really regret it." "If you don't give up gluten foods you're going to get really sick" etc etc. Maybe there's some truth in some of this, but it's the busybody authoritative tone that gets to me. I would say, instead: "Maybe think about a second dog at your age"—if anything.
You have more patience than I do.
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Old 06-19-2014, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,785 posts, read 4,838,667 times
Reputation: 19458
We have a senior friend (15 years older than me) who won't stop telling me why I need to get an IPhone. I have an a phone I am happy with and use a low cost no contract carrier. He just never shuts up about it. He seems to want validation by having other people buy what he buys. I have told him a dozen times that I don't need a new phone. Now he's on a jag that my husband should buy an old sports car like he did. He couldn't even work on that thing, and my DH had to help him get it running! I mean physically doing all the work because friend is too obese to get down on the floor. We have our own vintage car that DH has had for 25+ years and we don't WANT another one. It seems that the only way to get through to him will be by being rude. I think next time he starts in I will just stop listening until he asks "did you hear me?" and then I will say "Oh! No, I stopped listening once you said IPhone".
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Old 06-19-2014, 12:06 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,304,137 times
Reputation: 7523
'I will just stop listening until he asks "did you hear me?" and then I will say "Oh! No, I stopped listening once you said ________".'


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