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Old 06-16-2014, 11:07 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,901,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
A large home itself isn't the problem for a lot of people - it is a large yard and the required upkeep.

My parents bought an older, roughly 4000 sq ft home back in the late 1990s when they were around 40. The lot is about an acre, wooded, and on a hill, and then dad bought the next door lot, for about an acre and a half.

You have to shift your weight around while riding the mower to not roll it, and the areas that have to be push mowed are steep enough to need cleats. Doing all the mowing, weed eating, and blowing off the grass takes at least three hours. Combine with that mulching, landscaping, cleaning up fallen limbs, trimming trees, etc, it is very time consuming, labor intensive, and becoming more difficult as dad ages. A smaller yard would be more than plenty for them now that I'm gone.

Most of the people I know who are entering retirement still want a SFH, but are often scaling back on the stairs and the yard.
I have a acre with new house but the yard does have so many objects in it making it easy to cut with our zero turn mower. In fact its easier than our smaller yard before. 45 minutes going slow and we are done with minimum trimming. this is out third home and largest lot but the others had to be cut with self propelled smaller as zero turn or tractor just left too much trimming and unable to get to some spots.no wrestling a hand mower now and much faster than smaller more restricted yard.
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Old 06-16-2014, 11:12 AM
 
526 posts, read 741,314 times
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our small acreage gives me so much pleasure! I imagine if we lived where the yard was in public view & I felt I "had to" keep it up, the pleasure would turn to work.
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Old 06-16-2014, 11:22 AM
 
14,258 posts, read 23,979,216 times
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I am in the process of downsizing from 1475 sq ft to 975 sq ft. I have to say that it is much more difficult to do it than I would have expected.

In the old days, you could call second hand shops and sell a lot of stuff. The whole process of eliminating rooms of furniture would be done in a day or two. Craigslist does not do it well, unless you really want to give the stuff away. Post anything and you pretty much get a dozen emails wanting everything for free. At the end of the week, I will have the Salvation Army pick up the remainders.

He have given a lot of stuff away to friends in need.
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Old 06-16-2014, 11:29 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,297,923 times
Reputation: 7522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
A large home itself isn't the problem for a lot of people - it is a large yard and the required upkeep.

My parents bought an older, roughly 4000 sq ft home back in the late 1990s when they were around 40. The lot is about an acre, wooded, and on a hill, and then dad bought the next door lot, for about an acre and a half.

You have to shift your weight around while riding the mower to not roll it, and the areas that have to be push mowed are steep enough to need cleats. Doing all the mowing, weed eating, and blowing off the grass takes at least three hours. Combine with that mulching, landscaping, cleaning up fallen limbs, trimming trees, etc, it is very time consuming, labor intensive, and becoming more difficult as dad ages. A smaller yard would be more than plenty for them now that I'm gone.

Most of the people I know who are entering retirement still want a SFH, but are often scaling back on the stairs and the yard.
yeppers, that's us. He hasn't mowed the yard in years, and pushing that mower up the small hills is not a workout for me anymore, it's a chore that I would rather not deal with.

Having a sinus infection for eight months and feeling like I would pass out after a half hour might have something to do with that. Saturday was the first time I mowed and didn't feel liike I needed the ER in months.

I mow just under two acres around the house and maybe another half acre around the corral.

We will be going to 2400 sft from 1200 and five acres from ten.
I want closets.
A kitchen (ours is 8x10-no lie) with cabinets and storage so I will use my entire cookware set, not just the ones within reach; enough counter space where I don't have to roll out pie crusts on the dining room table.
And guest bedrooms, we thought having one bedroom would be a guest deterrent? Hell no.

And two bathrooms (ever have to hold it for your turn? That could get ugly in old age).

No attic. No storing seasonal things in the attic. No good china in attic.

'I want my things about me. There's a hundred years of happy dreaming in those things.'

~Maureen O'Hara in The Quiet Man
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Old 06-16-2014, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,567 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzz View Post
My boomer parents moved into a much larger home when they retired. They have accumulated so much garbage over the past 20 years they have an entire wing of the lower level filled floor to ceiling with moving boxes that they will never open.
I would think they would have wanted to at least get rid of some things before moving. I just moved a few months ago and have tons of books which I need to get rid of. I am not hauling all these books around. The more stuff you have, the harder it is to downsize. Sometimes I think people's possessions possess them.

We are going through a similar situation with my grandmother. She talks about wanting to get a condo or something without a yard, but has "stuff" in the basement that hasn't been used in a decade or longer, before my grandfather passed away. She wants to neither get rid of the things nor sort them. The basement has been practically unused except for the washer/dryer for many years.
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I would think they would have wanted to at least get rid of some things before moving. I just moved a few months ago and have tons of books which I need to get rid of. I am not hauling all these books around. The more stuff you have, the harder it is to downsize. Sometimes I think people's possessions possess them.
For a while I was on a real roll getting rid of stuff, then slacked off after making the old man clean out the shed and basement. I had already gotten rid of most of the heavy furniture.

But....there's always a few heavy items that you think you must keep, cannot part with, etc. Three such items have been on my radar for months, I glanced at them with scrutiny every time I passed them—a wood-frame gliding chair (heavy), a small heavy end table, and a heavy wrought iron planter on the front porch.

Today in a no-nonsense fit I had them loaded into the SUV and away I drove them to Goodwill, which was happy to receive them. I drove home thinking "several hundred pounds lighter" and already I do not miss these things in the slightest. I am in love with everything that is lightweight.

The tough one is the attached garage. Renovation materials all over the place, plastic buckets and boxes ("we'll need them when we move"), tools, etc. The one heavy thing I'd like to personally send over a cliff into the dump is the snowblower.
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzz View Post
My boomer parents moved into a much larger home when they retired. They have accumulated so much garbage over the past 20 years they have an entire wing of the lower level filled floor to ceiling with moving boxes that they will never open.
That scene would make me break out in hives.
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Old 06-16-2014, 01:36 PM
 
Location: somewhere in the woods
16,884 posts, read 13,030,934 times
Reputation: 5211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
well, this is one boomer that thinks big houses are more bother than they're worth.


I went from a 3k sqft home to a 6400 sqft home. used to have a few hundred acres of land and now have over a thousand acres. I am not planning on downsizing at all, and I would purchase more land if my neighbors would sell theirs to me.
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Old 06-16-2014, 03:54 PM
 
1,971 posts, read 2,490,556 times
Reputation: 2170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I would think they would have wanted to at least get rid of some things before moving. I just moved a few months ago and have tons of books which I need to get rid of. I am not hauling all these books around. The more stuff you have, the harder it is to downsize. Sometimes I think people's possessions possess them.

We are going through a similar situation with my grandmother. She talks about wanting to get a condo or something without a yard, but has "stuff" in the basement that hasn't been used in a decade or longer, before my grandfather passed away. She wants to neither get rid of the things nor sort them. The basement has been practically unused except for the washer/dryer for many years.
They did, that was what was left after purging about 1/2 their stuff. My grandparents were even worse. It took 2 semi trailer sized dumpsters to get rid of my grandparent's stuff. What was scarier was that their house seemed relatively "normal." It wasn't a "hoarder house" at all. All that stuff was just hidden away in drawers, closets, the basement and the garage.
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Old 06-16-2014, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,545,637 times
Reputation: 29032
I know quite a few boomers who would love to retire and vacate their family homes but they can't ... because their adult children moved back in. Sometimes bringing THEIR children. One of my relatives has more people living in his house now than he did when his kids were small.
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