U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-17-2014, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,623 posts, read 9,694,429 times
Reputation: 11007

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzz View Post
They did, that was what was left after purging about 1/2 their stuff. My grandparents were even worse. It took 2 semi trailer sized dumpsters to get rid of my grandparent's stuff. What was scarier was that their house seemed relatively "normal." It wasn't a "hoarder house" at all. All that stuff was just hidden away in drawers, closets, the basement and the garage.
My aunt's house was like that. Neat as a pin but crowded. She had two storage sheds, a garage and a large storage attached to that! I used to tease her that I bet she still had the first paper clip she ever laid hands on. lol I felt really sorry for my cousin when he had to get rid of all that stuff. He did find some 'good' stuff though like his and his brothers old toys. Made in the 30s and 40s and still good as new. I almost bought that little car my younger cousin used to 'buzz around' in.

You never know what you might find. Or lose if you don't go through all of it. My grandmother had a little storage shed with a mysterious trunk in it. We weren't allowed to touch it. Probably just because we were kids but we thought there was some 'secret'. Anyway, I forgot about it for years, my grandparents passed away and their kids did the 'clean up'. I found out way later that there were letters my mom had written to the family over a period of five years before she came to the US from Australia. Ages 15 to 20. They tossed them. How I would have LOVED to have those letters. My aunt did give me other family things, for which I am grateful, but I still think about those letters. My mom is still alive too and I bet she'd love to read them as well.

Another thing they found after Grandma passed away was a metal box of money in a locked dresser drawer. A dollar at a time, for years, she had put away enough money to pay for her own funeral. She left a note with it to let them know that's what it was for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-17-2014, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,623 posts, read 9,694,429 times
Reputation: 11007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
I know quite a few boomers who would love to retire and vacate their family homes but they can't ... because their adult children moved back in. Sometimes bringing THEIR children. One of my relatives has more people living in his house now than he did when his kids were small.
I was thinking that myself. So many kids, sometimes with family in tow, moving back in with parents. In thinking back, my mom has always had someone who counted her home as their residence, even if they didn't spend much time there. Basically still lived alone but... Now that nephew and his wife are moved out HIS dad has taken up part time residence. That's fine with me though because he can help me out with Mom. When he's there, which is basically only from 3-12 PM. She downsized a bunch but still has too much room for one person.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,563,101 times
Reputation: 16777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
I know quite a few boomers who would love to retire and vacate their family homes but they can't ... because their adult children moved back in. Sometimes bringing THEIR children. One of my relatives has more people living in his house now than he did when his kids were small.
A friend of mine had that situation constantly for a while. Once there wasn't even a spare couch to sleep on. On son with a booze problem ended up with no lisence, a sort of job and a cheap room when they finally left the house. Being a place for a rest and recovery from disastor but moving on is not such a bad thing, but kids shouldn't move in thinking its for good.

We think its neat when you watch walton's reruns, but then they were used to that as it was a sociatial norm for then. Now, not so easy.

I moved to OK from Califorinia. Not that my son is thinking of it, but he'll not move here since he doesn't want to move out of California....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2014, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,563,101 times
Reputation: 16777
My house is 730 sf, two bedrooms, one currently suffed with 'stuff' awaiting warm weather so I can put it where it goes. The living room furnature I made myself and am about to attack the room they call a kitchen minus any shelves. It will be a great kitchen, but right now its a room where you can cook. I took the smallest bedroom for myself and did a mural on the walls just for me.

I have big trees and grass. I got a push mower and surprised the neighbors at how easy it was to use. No more paying money for mowing. I have um *extensive* plans for the back yard and more for the front. But in time... thats the fun, it doesn't have to happen all now.

I had a lot of stuff but lost it all, except for what's was in the car. I lost all the stuff from mom's family and I miss that most of all. But I look at stuff now as is it practical? Thus, I'm using the old plastic dishes, some 'disposable' that I got five years ago, and have nice power tools (yes, I'm female). My hobbies matter so the yarn and floss are high up there on my list of keepers, and I've always collected books. If I could, I'd add one side to my house and make a storage room and 'den' where the living room I'm doing up in simple dark victorian could stay unmessy. (and a bigger tv). But this will do. And its all mine, which matters more.

I think for the boomer generation a house is important since most of us grew up in single family houses, even if smaller 'retro' ones. Having a little patch of ground that's yours is too. Maybe the next generation who might have lived in a condo or apartment won't think that way, but I think when you retire you start thinking back and that is how you started out.

We have a vacent lot next to us someone said I could get for three hundred. I could save up that much... Its sooo tempting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2014, 01:35 PM
 
491 posts, read 598,639 times
Reputation: 2095
(b) Stuff that loved ones have given you and you'd feel somehow disloyal if you got rid of it

I have found that stuff easier to get rid of when I realized they gave it to me because they didn't want it anymore but felt guilty for what ever reason getting rid of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2014, 05:57 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,310,125 times
Reputation: 7524
LOL, Stressed, I am a china maven, mostly because I sell it on ebay.

I have liquidated my massive inventory that once lined my laundry room in totes five feet high.

Now I just have my daily set and my classic set that my mother collected for me in the nineties.

Back atya on the Bactrim, it's banned in the UK because the horrid reactions are so common; so, no, it's not just you.

I guess we hang onto our stuff until life sends us in a new direction, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

Rock on! Hopefully DH will get his attitude in gear soon. We figured out his new love, Diet Mt. Dew, is what has been messing up his sleep patterns. The caffeine! Doh!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2014, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Tucson
446 posts, read 572,411 times
Reputation: 565
We currently live in a teeny, tiny 975 square foot condo. The laundry room is on the roof of my building. Yes, that is correct. The roof. So in order to to the laundry you take the elevator to the penthouse and walk the final stairway to the roof. This didn't bother us when we first moved in many years ago but last year my husband slipped coming down the stairs and needed surgery on his knee to repair the damage. Needless to say, our future home in retirement will be in a real house. Maybe 2000 square feet. That will feel huge to us. With a real laundry room. And no stairs of course. So we will certainly be "upsizing"!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2014, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,662 posts, read 1,528,456 times
Reputation: 3650
This is a scary article for those of us planning to downsize. We may not even be able to give away the good stuff as no one wants it.

Why the Market for Heirloom and Secondhand Furniture Has Disappeared - WSJ

"Whether moving to a smaller abode or simply cleaning out, many people are making an unwelcome discovery: Their prized family heirlooms have turned into junk. Upholstered sofas, formal dining tables and hutches, Victorian-style mahogany and oak furniture, entertainment units, bulky television sets, pianos—all have become almost impossible to sell or, in some cases, give away."

Other examples provided were exercise equipment, armoires, and dressers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2014, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
This is a scary article for those of us planning to downsize. We may not even be able to give away the good stuff as no one wants it.

Why the Market for Heirloom and Secondhand Furniture Has Disappeared - WSJ

"Whether moving to a smaller abode or simply cleaning out, many people are making an unwelcome discovery: Their prized family heirlooms have turned into junk. Upholstered sofas, formal dining tables and hutches, Victorian-style mahogany and oak furniture, entertainment units, bulky television sets, pianos—all have become almost impossible to sell or, in some cases, give away."

Other examples provided were exercise equipment, armoires, and dressers.
Our society's lifestyle has changed dramatically. Many younger adults are on the move, more often renting because of job changes. No room for these big heavy pieces of furniture and hauling them from place to place is costly. Places like IKEA offer the kind of stuff that appeals, for these reasons.

I wonder about other collectibles, Depression glass and the like. I've had a museum known for its Japanese prints turn down an original woodblock print of mine by a well-known 18thC artist—too common. A lot of the things we think are going to be "worth something someday" are apparently not. I sometimes wonder if I should regret giving away a full set of heavy real silverware in a mahogany case.

I know one thing for sure, and that is that the younger generation neither wants, nor wants to deal with, our stuff no matter how valuable we think it is. I have a lovely very heavy antique breadboard (I no longer make bread) from my grandmother that no one in the family seems to want, and I cannot seem to part with it. I guess quality "things" are becoming less and less important than tech stuff.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2014, 09:00 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,310,125 times
Reputation: 7524
I'm sure the karmic collector circle will turn, when the thirty somethings begin to settle down and choose quality over cheap. In this economy it may take awhile but it will happen.

That being said, we have choices, hang onto it and hope or pare down and be lighter.

I'm doing a bit of both. Selling the less valuable stuff to lighten up, but hanging onto the better things.

I hope that silver service went to someone who will really appreciate it, that was a huge chonk o' change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top