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Old 06-27-2014, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,543 posts, read 44,077,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
They will tell you that you won't have any pain, and everyone who came out of the operating room said they had no pain. Well, I had some pain with my first eye. But I gritted my teeth and stayed perfectly still, and the laser procedure did not last long. My second eye was done totally pain free. Based on my experience, I'd recommend not waiting to get this done. I suspect I had the moments of pain because that cataract was the worst one, in the eye where vision was most unclear. I want to emphasize that the pain I had was not typical, and did not last very long.
I had absolutely no pain for either eye.

My surgery for both eyes was done as an outpatient at a major hospital by a very experienced opthamalogist.

I had twilight anesthetic administered intravenously through my arm for the first eye, as well as an injection into the eye. Only residual effect was I was a bit sluggish the rest of the day and was not allowed to drive. It took a day to get that anesthetic out of my system.

Because of this and because the first surgery was such a nonevent, I chose not to have twilight anesthetic the second time. Piece of cake - or, so I thought.

BIG MISTAKE.

I still experienced no pain, even with the injection. But, I was wholly conscious for the entire procedure, which included staring at a super bright white light to the point I thought I'd never see again, listening to the whirring of whatever is used to break up the cataract which seemed to take forever. I knew I couldn't/dare not move, so I didn't. A very unpleasant experience which I hope never to repeat.

I've since told anyone doing this surgery do not refuse that mild anesthetic.
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Old 06-27-2014, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,954 posts, read 14,428,907 times
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That bright white light actually made the pain more bearable for me. It was like Biblical white light and beautiful. I so desired to see it with the second eye, but alas, that cataract must have been on the side of the eyeball. And the procedure lasted only a few seconds. So all I "saw" was an amorphous pinkish light which lasted perhaps 3 or 4 seconds. I was disappointed! But I had no pain.

When people are led out of the operating room, they say things like, "Oh it was so fast and it was painless." I heard that several times. And I've spoken with others, including DH, who told me they had no pain. So I think my experience was atypical.
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Old 07-03-2014, 10:54 AM
 
2,014 posts, read 1,255,909 times
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Good information in this thread. Are any of the people who've had the surgery shooters? I'm curious about how it works with sights on firearms.
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Old 07-03-2014, 11:29 AM
 
1,774 posts, read 2,447,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderer0101 View Post
Good information in this thread. Are any of the people who've had the surgery shooters? I'm curious about how it works with sights on firearms.

Yes - an no, no effect at all except as I noted glare around lights at night. So if you shoot at night as long as you are not shooting into light, you are fine. You'll love having your night vision back.
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Old 07-03-2014, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,569,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
I had absolutely no pain for either eye.

My surgery for both eyes was done as an outpatient at a major hospital by a very experienced opthamalogist.

I had twilight anesthetic administered intravenously through my arm for the first eye, as well as an injection into the eye. Only residual effect was I was a bit sluggish the rest of the day and was not allowed to drive. It took a day to get that anesthetic out of my system.

Because of this and because the first surgery was such a nonevent, I chose not to have twilight anesthetic the second time. Piece of cake - or, so I thought.

BIG MISTAKE.

I still experienced no pain, even with the injection. But, I was wholly conscious for the entire procedure, which included staring at a super bright white light to the point I thought I'd never see again, listening to the whirring of whatever is used to break up the cataract which seemed to take forever. I knew I couldn't/dare not move, so I didn't. A very unpleasant experience which I hope never to repeat.

I've since told anyone doing this surgery do not refuse that mild anesthetic.
I'd had lasik done before, and it has to be done awake. I had the eyes done one at a time with the catarac, and the second eye developed after the first was done. But she said this little pink pill would make me sleepy and I'd sleep through it. I told her they don't work, and said okay fine, it still won't. A half hour later, I'm still quite awake. She was surprised. Second eye she did the iv and didn't bother trying the pill. I didn't want to know anything about the surgery...

I didn't have pain, but needed lots of rest and quiet. I'm still glad I did it, problem or not.

Only problem I've had is the second eye, the pupil didn't heal right. It doesn't close enough for light, but I can wear sunglasses. I don't know if that was because my authorization for the followup was a day late and it took almost a month for another one or it just happened. I was told I could have surgery to fix it, but think I'll pass.
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:07 AM
 
2,043 posts, read 1,953,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
So eventually, I opted to have my near vision fixed, since I read constantly, and since I can move around the house without glasses and see well enough to function. So, my near vision (I am naturally near sighted) was made quite, quite good. I am typing this without my glasses on. But then, I always did that before.

My vision is much clearer! One odd thing--it took several weeks for my right eye to be fully corrected. I was dismayed to hear that the doc could not correct it fully after the surgery. But, a month later, my eye was where it should be, that is, it could be fully corrected with glasses. So, who knows? I'm glad to have this behind me.

Good luck with your surgery. Just do it. Don't put it off. You won't be sorry.
Yes, since we share the same preference for reading instead of outdoor activities I have a specific question for you that I've been wondering about. I assume you have the standard monofocal IOL put in for near vision in both eyes, so after surgery you can read without glasses but need glasses for distance activities like driving. Can I ask about your near vision after the cataract surgery, can you focus at different near-distances, for example, reading a book is usually at a shorter distance like with bended elbow while looking at a computer display is at a slightly longer distance like a straight elbow, can you read at both distances (for example now I can view both books and computer display with the same glasses and use my eye to focus at both distances)? Or can you for example only see the computer distance with the monofocal IOL and need reading glasses to read books and prescription glasses to see distance?

I'm just wondering how much of the natural focusing ability you lose when you have the monofocal IOLs put it?
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Old 07-08-2014, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,954 posts, read 14,428,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fumbling View Post
Yes, since we share the same preference for reading instead of outdoor activities I have a specific question for you that I've been wondering about. I assume you have the standard monofocal IOL put in for near vision in both eyes, so after surgery you can read without glasses but need glasses for distance activities like driving. Can I ask about your near vision after the cataract surgery, can you focus at different near-distances, for example, reading a book is usually at a shorter distance like with bended elbow while looking at a computer display is at a slightly longer distance like a straight elbow, can you read at both distances (for example now I can view both books and computer display with the same glasses and use my eye to focus at both distances)? Or can you for example only see the computer distance with the monofocal IOL and need reading glasses to read books and prescription glasses to see distance?

I'm just wondering how much of the natural focusing ability you lose when you have the monofocal IOLs put it?
Just saw your question today.

I read and use the computer and Ipad without my glasses. I tend to lean forward at the computer. If I lean far enough back, vision is less clear but still readable. I have always read without my glasses, and I continue to do so.

Prior to the surgery, I found it hard to read for any length of time. I am back to my normal constant reading after the surgery. (It has been one year.)

If I understand your question, you are concerned about perhaps only seeing optimally at one distance point? In my experience, my vision is like it was 20 years ago. I can see closer things about as well as I did then, and have trouble with distance the same. I don't feel that I have to place things at one point to see them, and if too close I cannot focus.

Hope this is clear!
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Old 07-09-2014, 12:02 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,770 posts, read 7,054,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Just saw your question today.

I read and use the computer and Ipad without my glasses. I tend to lean forward at the computer. If I lean far enough back, vision is less clear but still readable. I have always read without my glasses, and I continue to do so.

Prior to the surgery, I found it hard to read for any length of time. I am back to my normal constant reading after the surgery. (It has been one year.)

If I understand your question, you are concerned about perhaps only seeing optimally at one distance point? In my experience, my vision is like it was 20 years ago. I can see closer things about as well as I did then, and have trouble with distance the same. I don't feel that I have to place things at one point to see them, and if too close I cannot focus.

Hope this is clear!

I think I know what you mean. Because what you're saying has a familiar ring to it, from my 9-month out cataract surgery ( I had the right eye done in mid-October 2013, and the left eye two days before Thanksgiving). I had the monofocal distance correction IOL's put in, which have immensely improved my distance vision. But I have to use reading glasses to read and do computer work. But it all works for me.

If I recall correctly, the poster asked how much "natural focusing ability" someone who has cataract surgery loses if he has monofocal IOL's put in , and it's an interesting question. I'm thinking that with the loss of his natural lenses, he probably loses all or most of it. That's one of the reasons they don't do cataract surgery as soon as cataracts appear in someone's eyes, they wait until those cataracts adversely affect the person's vision enough to interfere with his daily life and the vision can't be corrected by glasses or contact lenses. By that time, the cataracts have pretty much replaced the natural lenses and there's not much focusing power left anyway, in addition to interference with vision otherwise.

The monofocal lenses correct the vision either at a distant or close-up focal point, depending on the patient's preference. The vision at locations other than the focal point are less optimal, because that lens won't "autofocus", so the patient can either adjust to that less than optimal vision ( which is likely better than he saw before with those cataracts), adjust his position closer or further to the object he's viewing, ( this would be for reading, computer work), or he can use prescription glass/contact lenses which are customized to provide the optimum vision at all distances, depending on what the person needs. I use cheapie drug-store magnifying glasses for my computer work and reading, and don't need glasses at all for driving or distance vision. With the close vision, I'll move closer or further away physically to see something better.

If I understand the bifocal IOL correctly, they're a bit like the bifocal/?trifocal lenses in eyeglasses. The correction of vision at either distance or close vision depends on which part of the IOL the person looks through, so placement and alignment of these IOL's following removal of the cataracts during surgery is critical. I don't know how many of the problems people report with these lenses may be due to the lenses not being aligned just right, or if it's just an adjustment the patient has to make to the IOL's. I know after I got my first pair of bifocals at age 40, I had to be careful with steps because as I looked down I had a hard time judging the distance between the steps, and took a couple tumbles till I got used to the things.
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Old 07-09-2014, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,569,443 times
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I never thought about the focusing. When I was in high school my left eye was so bad that I had to do exercises in focusing to strengthen it to see if it would work, since otherwise they would have had to surgecially fixed it but my brain wasn't 'seeing' through it some of the time.

I tried them and they don't work. Its been almost eight years so maybe I'm just used to it and both cataracs were so bad I basically saw shadow.

And just incase, something I discovered too late. If you take the drug serequel and start to have less good vision, get off it. One of the KNOWN effects of it which got a red check warning on the FDA approval is a tendency to cause cataracs. It is the source of both of mine.

If you get a catarac you should do the research and find the offical list of side effect of any meds and see if that is one of them and even when my doctor was being seen monthly he *never* knew the drug causes them. Educate yourself.
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Old 07-10-2014, 09:24 AM
 
2,499 posts, read 6,401,269 times
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I am 81 and had surgery 20 years ago with IOL placed,still have 20/20 vision,one eye never done,very minor clouding.
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