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Old 08-09-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,534,193 times
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I had both eyes done, one not healing correctly, but put up with the iris not closing for light. But I had never noticed focusing difficulties. Then I got this new laptop and the screen is smaller. They are bigger on the one I'm going to fix. And when they are little I realized I close one eye and physicallly back off and got ahead to see the end of it. Strange I never noticed before. Sometimes I simply can't make it out.
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Old 08-09-2014, 06:01 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,428,298 times
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I read the whole thread, and just wanted to clarify a few issues different people have brought up.

--Some people will never get cataracts, no matter how old they become.
--Surgery to remove the lens of an eye that doesn't have a cataract is called a Clear-Lens Extraction (CLE). It's done all the time. But no insurance will pay for it.
--Standard use of non-surgical monovision contact lenses (one eye for reading, one for distance) does not mean that glasses worn when the contacts are out must also be monovision as well. I wear them and have backup glasses that are non-monovision.
--I am not understanding why anyone would need glasses at all after surgical implant monovision lenses (?) They are the only game in town that permits intermediate vision, like for using a computer, as well as near and far.
--No poster mentioned being farsighted (good distance vision) and later developing presbyopia, the loss of ability to focus on near objects, but who hate to correct for "near," because they lose a lot of their "far." This is the most common reason for people getting monovision CLE's; they want out of glasses completely.
--There are other options in the pipeline. This one is interesting, and is already available in Europe. It's a lens that is implanted first and later adjusted to your preferences:

The Calhoun adjustable IOL breaks new ground
Clinical trial in US ongoing: Cataracts LAL Lens Clinical Trials in Dallas - Fort Worth
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Old 08-09-2014, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,879 posts, read 25,306,858 times
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This is a good thread. Lots of info and experiences.

I have no idea if and when I will need this done but I did have monovision LASIK more than 10 years ago so since I already know I adjust just fine to monovision I would probably go with it again. It is really nice to be the only person I know in my age group who doesn't need 'readers'.

I was very nearsighted most of my life and I love cool sunglasses!

After reading this thread, it doesn't scare me. I still remember those frog eye lenses folks with cataract surgery used to wear! Sounds like it has gotten much better.
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Old 05-03-2016, 10:41 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,832,665 times
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Time to update this thread! I'm scheduled for cataract surgery and even after reading all the previous pages, I'm still confused.

My surgeon wants me to choose to be corrected either for near, intermediate, or distance. I haven't seen these three options listed before. I don't need the toric lenses because it turns out I don't have much astigmatism. I'll just get the standard lens.

But if you were given THREE choices, which one would you choose? I initially chose intermediate because it said you would see the computer, price tags in stores, and it's good for cooking. Then I started to wonder what you would do for near and distance. So I called my eye doc and she said I could get progressive lens glasses that would correct for near and far with clear for intermediate. I don't think I'd mind that--it sounds better than having several different pairs of glasses.

I've worn glasses since childhood and am extremely near sighted. Distance to me, would mean being able to see the alarm clock! Distance to me would mean being able to see my hand in front of my face! To me, distance isn't about driving--of course I assume I would wear glasses for driving. What's the best choice if you can choose close up (reading), intermediate (computer, price tags), or distance (driving.)
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Old 05-03-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,063 posts, read 9,522,564 times
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I don't know about those choices, but I've been wearing progressives for thirty-one years, both pre- and post-LASIK. My optometrist told me that not everyone can get accustomed to progressives. And poor quality progressives are a real problem, so be sure to go to a quality optician for them. Her disaster story was about a well-known one-hour glasses provider. A friend of ours has been happy with Wal-Mart for his glasses, but I don't think they're progressives.

I got a "monovision" LASIK correction - one eye corrected for near and the other for far. I really like it*, and I hope I can get cataract lenses like that when my time comes. But again, not everyone can adapt to it.

*once I managed to convince the drivers' licence folks to provide an appropriate vision test. It was the first they'd heard of it.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:38 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33721
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
I don't know about those choices, but I've been wearing progressives for thirty-one years, both pre- and post-LASIK. My optometrist told me that not everyone can get accustomed to progressives. And poor quality progressives are a real problem, so be sure to go to a quality optician for them. Her disaster story was about a well-known one-hour glasses provider. A friend of ours has been happy with Wal-Mart for his glasses, but I don't think they're progressives.

I got a "monovision" LASIK correction - one eye corrected for near and the other for far. I really like it*, and I hope I can get cataract lenses like that when my time comes. But again, not everyone can adapt to it.

*once I managed to convince the drivers' licence folks to provide an appropriate vision test. It was the first they'd heard of it.

LOL @ the drivers' license people. As for progressive lenses, I've had then in my glasses for years with no problem. The brand name is Varilux--they're expensive but I've never had a problem.

So I don't mind getting progressive lens glasses and they would be thinner after the surgery. But I have never heard of the three choices for correction and it is driving me BATTY! Maybe I should just tell them to correct for distance since that's what most people seem to do. I'd like to see the bedside clock without holding it close to my eyes--but would that mean correcting for close up? So confusing.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,534 posts, read 43,972,276 times
Reputation: 15135
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I'm scheduled for cataract surgery and even after reading all the previous pages, I'm still confused.

My surgeon wants me to choose to be corrected either for near, intermediate, or distance. I haven't seen these three options listed before. I don't need the toric lenses because it turns out I don't have much astigmatism. I'll just get the standard lens.

But if you were given THREE choices, which one would you choose? I initially chose intermediate because it said you would see the computer, price tags in stores, and it's good for cooking. Then I started to wonder what you would do for near and distance. So I called my eye doc and she said I could get progressive lens glasses that would correct for near and far with clear for intermediate. I don't think I'd mind that--it sounds better than having several different pairs of glasses.

I've worn glasses since childhood and am extremely near sighted. Distance to me, would mean being able to see the alarm clock! Distance to me would mean being able to see my hand in front of my face! To me, distance isn't about driving--of course I assume I would wear glasses for driving. What's the best choice if you can choose close up (reading), intermediate (computer, price tags), or distance (driving.)
Distance. At the time I was not asked about "intermediate" - glad I wasn't because it would have confused me. Pleased with my choice. As it happens, left eye is now 20/20 - clear as a bell; right not quite that good, but good enough. 74 y/o, if that matters.

I, too, was extremely nearsighted and have been since I've been 10 y/o. My cataract correction is for distance - which is great for driving and almost everything I do around the house. I now only use drugstore reading glasses to read bottle labels, newspapers, etc. I don't find "intermediate" range to be an issue, at all, and don't need glasses to do any normal work around the house, including cooking. I can read anything on a grocery store shelf and all signs. If I actually need to read the label on a product, I put on my glasses. My reading glasses are always with me and are used for both computer and reading. Since they're so cheap, they're all over the house. I have not spent hundreds on eyeglasses since the surgery and don't plan to.

Prior to the surgery, I had had contacts - right eye corrected for near, left for far and used them for years. I did NOT like it. Especially at night, I felt somewhat handicapped taking walks with the right eye so 'off.' So, when doc asked what correction I wanted, I said both eyes the same. Don't regret my choice, at all.
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Old 05-03-2016, 06:34 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
Distance. At the time I was not asked about "intermediate" - glad I wasn't because it would have confused me. Pleased with my choice. As it happens, left eye is now 20/20 - clear as a bell; right not quite that good, but good enough. 74 y/o, if that matters.

I, too, was extremely nearsighted and have been since I've been 10 y/o. My cataract correction is for distance - which is great for driving and almost everything I do around the house. I now only use drugstore reading glasses to read bottle labels, newspapers, etc. I don't find "intermediate" range to be an issue, at all, and don't need glasses to do any normal work around the house, including cooking. I can read anything on a grocery store shelf and all signs. If I actually need to read the label on a product, I put on my glasses. My reading glasses are always with me and are used for both computer and reading. Since they're so cheap, they're all over the house. I have not spent hundreds on eyeglasses since the surgery and don't plan to.

Prior to the surgery, I had had contacts - right eye corrected for near, left for far and used them for years. I did NOT like it. Especially at night, I felt somewhat handicapped taking walks with the right eye so 'off.' So, when doc asked what correction I wanted, I said both eyes the same. Don't regret my choice, at all.
Thank you. Distance.

I was just reading about the choices and I think the intermediate means one eye corrected for near and the other for distance. I don't like the idea of it although it seems to work great for some people.

If you were as nearsighted as I am and you corrected for distance, AND you like it, that's a good indication that I should do the same.

I'd still be interested in what others have to say but I'm leaning toward correcting for distance now.
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Old 05-03-2016, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,534,193 times
Reputation: 16771
Quote:
Originally Posted by fumbling View Post
I may have to make a future decision on cataract surgery so am wondering what the experiences people have had. I am nearsighted so this is a chance to improve my eyesight with the replacement cataract.

Not sure what the exact terms are since I am starting my research but there seems to be the basic monofocal IOL that allows me to look at books/computers without glasses and look at distance for driving as example with glasses. Others use the monofocal IOL to look at books with glasses and distance without glasses. These are considered "standard" cataract surgery fully covered by insurance. Then there are the "premium" IOLs which are "multi-focal" IOLs which in theory allow people to look at books and distance without glasses. These premium IOLs require out of pocket expense since they are not fully covered by insurance.

Would like to hear about first-hand cataract surgery experiences people have had, whether they like the IOL they picked, or even what people have heard from others who have had cataract surgery?
I know I picked the one they would pay for, and after glasses, contacts, laser surgery, and so on, I LOVE the vision I have. Close up I use reading glasses, several strengths, one for small print, one for normal and one for the computer. I found a place on amazon which has really well made reading glasses too. But the vision up close was vastly improved already.

Generally, unless I'm reading small print, I can read larger print on paper or the screen without either. But if you get reading glasses, make sure of the quality since it makes a huge difference.

My right eye didn't heal right, and the pupil doesn't contract, but unfortunately that would be hard to fix. I'm pretty much over more eye surgery.
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Old 05-03-2016, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,534 posts, read 43,972,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Thank you. Distance.

I was just reading about the choices and I think the intermediate means one eye corrected for near and the other for distance. I don't like the idea of it although it seems to work great for some people.

If you were as nearsighted as I am and you corrected for distance, AND you like it, that's a good indication that I should do the same.
Oh, I've been "blind as a bat" from a young age. Runs in the family. Not now, however. What I didn't like about different corrections on IOL's is that the decision is almost irrevocable. Contact lense prescriptions can be changed. With an IOL, you're stuck with it - unless you can convince doc and Medicare to replace the lens. And, to give you some sense of how well I can see - from my chair in the living room I can clearly read the address on the house across the street - at least a couple of hundred feet away, if not further. I'm happy.
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