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Old 05-04-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,671 posts, read 3,248,729 times
Reputation: 11956

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When I had glaucoma surgery my eye doctor said he would need to do the cataract surgery at the same time even tho I did not really need it then. He said if at some point after the glaucoma surgery cataracts became a problem, he would not be able to do the cataract surgery. So I had no choice in the matter since my optic pressure was very high and the glaucoma surgery had to be done right away.

When the surgeon put the new lens in the right eye, it became stuck on the iris, something he could not correct. So for several months I had some problems with right eye vision. I ended up six months later needing multiple (over 50) laser treatments (all at the same appointment) to loosen the lens up from the iris. It worked but the right eye is still a problem. Even with the cataract surgery I still need to wear eyeglasses to read, watch TV, etc. My left eye is in pretty good shape but the problem with the right eye affects how I see.

I'm 74 and do not want another surgery and doctor advises against it, said more surgery could worsen the problem.

But at least I can still see and do all the things I want to be able to do.
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Old 05-04-2016, 11:22 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,842 posts, read 18,867,840 times
Reputation: 33750
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
When I had glaucoma surgery my eye doctor said he would need to do the cataract surgery at the same time even tho I did not really need it then. He said if at some point after the glaucoma surgery cataracts became a problem, he would not be able to do the cataract surgery. So I had no choice in the matter since my optic pressure was very high and the glaucoma surgery had to be done right away.

When the surgeon put the new lens in the right eye, it became stuck on the iris, something he could not correct. So for several months I had some problems with right eye vision. I ended up six months later needing multiple (over 50) laser treatments (all at the same appointment) to loosen the lens up from the iris. It worked but the right eye is still a problem. Even with the cataract surgery I still need to wear eyeglasses to read, watch TV, etc. My left eye is in pretty good shape but the problem with the right eye affects how I see.

I'm 74 and do not want another surgery and doctor advises against it, said more surgery could worsen the problem.

But at least I can still see and do all the things I want to be able to do.
It sounds like you were lucky even though you had to go through all of that. At least you can see.

I am meeting a friend for lunch tomorrow who is now officially blind in one eye and nearly blind in the other. She didn't get her glaucoma treated in time. Reason? Her husband had just died. When she finally felt up to going to the eye doc, he should have noticed but he didn't. Not it's too late.

That's just another reason for us to keep getting our eyes checked. It's not just to get a new prescription,it's for eye diseases too.
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Old 05-04-2016, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,671 posts, read 3,248,729 times
Reputation: 11956
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It sounds like you were lucky even though you had to go through all of that. At least you can see.

I am meeting a friend for lunch tomorrow who is now officially blind in one eye and nearly blind in the other. She didn't get her glaucoma treated in time. Reason? Her husband had just died. When she finally felt up to going to the eye doc, he should have noticed but he didn't. Not it's too late.

That's just another reason for us to keep getting our eyes checked. It's not just to get a new prescription,it's for eye diseases too.
I am really sorry to hear about your friend. Bad enough to lose her husband and all the grief she felt from that, but then to have her eye doc miss something THAT important!

I belong to a group that meets once a month. We all have glaucoma, have had various types of surgery and experiences, different treatments/drops. There is a lot of work to do until you get your situation responding to a treatment that works for you. The good news is they are working on it day and night. More wonderful things are coming down the pike to help people with glaucoma (and many other eye diseases). I've heard stem cell is a biggie and not sure what else, but if you like, I can send you a site next time I get an email from the foundation. Lots of information. Might be helpful for your friend.
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Old 05-04-2016, 02:16 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,842 posts, read 18,867,840 times
Reputation: 33750
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
I am really sorry to hear about your friend. Bad enough to lose her husband and all the grief she felt from that, but then to have her eye doc miss something THAT important!

I belong to a group that meets once a month. We all have glaucoma, have had various types of surgery and experiences, different treatments/drops. There is a lot of work to do until you get your situation responding to a treatment that works for you. The good news is they are working on it day and night. More wonderful things are coming down the pike to help people with glaucoma (and many other eye diseases). I've heard stem cell is a biggie and not sure what else, but if you like, I can send you a site next time I get an email from the foundation. Lots of information. Might be helpful for your friend.
Thanks so much but she has even been to Mass. Eye and Ear--supposed to be one of the best. She was told that there is surgery that could be done on her remaining eye but it could make her totally blind, it's so risky.
She says she'd rather try to keep the small bit of remaining eyesight that she has. I guess I can't blame her but I think she's going to go blind in that eye anyway.
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Old 05-04-2016, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,671 posts, read 3,248,729 times
Reputation: 11956
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Thanks so much but she has even been to Mass. Eye and Ear--supposed to be one of the best. She was told that there is surgery that could be done on her remaining eye but it could make her totally blind, it's so risky.
She says she'd rather try to keep the small bit of remaining eyesight that she has. I guess I can't blame her but I think she's going to go blind in that eye anyway.

I can certainly understand how she feels.

There is another excellent place in FL and another in PA.

In case anyone else is reading these posts, they might like to know that, too.
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Old 05-04-2016, 02:47 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,447,601 times
Reputation: 12308
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
What's the best choice if you can choose close up (reading), intermediate (computer, price tags), or distance (driving.)
I'm not understanding. Did your doc not suggest monovision, where one eye sees one of the above three visual fields, and the other eye sees yet another field? At least that way you'd get 2 out of 3.
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Old 05-04-2016, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,553,017 times
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One thing to remember with eye surgery is no matter how they assure you, there is still risk. The lasik I had ended up not focusing right, and then with the cataracs, the right eye healed where the pupil doesn't shrink. In bright light I automatically close it, but its managable in moderate light. And you aren't awake during catarac surgery.

The very wierdest thing about the implants is the way they change the shift to dark. In moderate light, you close your eye gradually and in an uneffected eye the light part fades gradually. With the incerts, its greying and suddenly without any transition its pitch dark. This is one of the things which took a little longer to get used to than I thought it would.
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Old 05-04-2016, 06:14 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,842 posts, read 18,867,840 times
Reputation: 33750
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
I'm not understanding. Did your doc not suggest monovision, where one eye sees one of the above three visual fields, and the other eye sees yet another field? At least that way you'd get 2 out of 3.
I think that's why I didn't understand. I only saw the doc for a very few minutes and he didn't explain anything. But someone handed me a sheet of paper to fill in and the choices were close up, intermediate, or distance.

Now, a week later, I've figured out from Dr Google that the intermediate must have been the one eye corrected for distance and the other corrected for close up. They didn't use the word "monovision."

Because I called their office and said I was confused, I have to go in again next week and put it in writing again and I'm just going to say "distance."

I was also wondering why I was never offered toric lenses but when I called my eye doc (not the surgeon) she told me that I don't have very much astigmatism so I don't need toric. At least that settled THAT.
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Old 05-04-2016, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,541 posts, read 44,028,155 times
Reputation: 15150
Wow, I guess I was lucky. Surgeon I had is very experienced, no problems with either eye. Nothing with pupils not closing, lenses getting stuck. Yikes. Did develop a few years later secondary cataracts in both eyes - cloudiness at the back of the capsule caused by residual cataract cells which reproduce - which occurs between 10-40% of the patients depending on which source one reads. Easily corrected by laser (posterior capsulotomy). Medicare pays for it - guess it's pretty common. Day I had the second eye done, there were six other Medicare-age people in the waiting room having the same procedure.

I haven't noticed any of this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
The very wierdest thing about the implants is the way they change the shift to dark. In moderate light, you close your eye gradually and in an uneffected eye the light part fades gradually. With the incerts, its greying and suddenly without any transition its pitch dark.
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Old 05-04-2016, 08:00 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,842 posts, read 18,867,840 times
Reputation: 33750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
Wow, I guess I was lucky. Surgeon I had is very experienced, no problems with either eye. Nothing with pupils not closing, lenses getting stuck. Yikes. Did develop a few years later secondary cataracts in both eyes - cloudiness at the back of the capsule caused by residual cataract cells which reproduce - which occurs between 10-40% of the patients depending on which source one reads. Easily corrected by laser (posterior capsulotomy). Medicare pays for it - guess it's pretty common. Day I had the second eye done, there were six other Medicare-age people in the waiting room having the same procedure.

I haven't noticed any of this:
Seems like there's a lot to know. More than meets the EYE (sorry).

As long as it can be corrected, that's fine. I wonder sometimes if my surgeon is just too "up there." In the waiting room someone asked me which dr I was going to see and when I told her she said, "Wow. How did you get him?" I asked her why and she said, "Oh, he's wonderful...." but then they called me so I didn't get to hear the rest of it.

His resume is very impressive too. But maybe the reason nothing was explained to me is that he is so busy.

Based upon the last few posts, it looks as though it's still going to be important to get yearly checkups to make sure nothing is going on.
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