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Old 06-25-2014, 03:22 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,608 posts, read 10,983,386 times
Reputation: 19303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
However, on the NYC subway/elevated passengers are actually pushed and pressed against other people during busy times of the day. Doesn't that sound sanitary and pleasant?
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
LOL. It's no surprise that someone who who is happy in a state where the cattle outnumber people would have a phobia about riding the NY subway. Come on in - the water's fine!
I'm not phobic about the New York subway. I'm simply unwilling to subject myself to it.

I average a trip to NYC every two or three years. I use cabs or drive myself. I works very well.
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Old 06-25-2014, 03:50 AM
 
72,228 posts, read 72,198,066 times
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i much prefer the long island railroad when we take the train in.
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Old 06-25-2014, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,990,283 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
I don't know the percentage of Irish immigrants vs. Irish americans in Woodlawn, but it's not an insigificant number--you hear brouges all the time on the street. The neighborhood is 85% white according to Wikipedia, but even that's probably not white enough for some on this board to feel comfortable .
There are still some small weird "white enclaves" in NYC. This one popped up on my radar screen after Hurricane Sandy:

Breezy Point, Queens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I've heard rumors in my family (my father and his siblings - those still alive are in their 90's now - grew up in Rockaway Beach - they moved there from the Bronx) that this area was (is?) both anti-semitic and racist - but I have no personal knowledge of the place. Robyn
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Old 06-25-2014, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,108 posts, read 24,948,560 times
Reputation: 11146
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttface3 View Post
Yep.



YES!!!!!!! FINALLY




lol I currently live in a bedroom 100sf. It's 10X10. I am lucky to have this!! Meanwhile, 20 years later, I *still* hear the taunts of rich kids mocking me for living in an apartment and because my mother was a maid. I also remember the rich adults who made snide comments about me and ignored me in front of other kids because I had a black eye, was clearly malnourished and never seemed to have a jacket warm enough. Not that I'm bitter or anything. But **** Garden City.
You had me fooled
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Old 06-25-2014, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,990,283 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttface3 View Post
...If the OP is looking to revisit her roots, why not take a look here? ...
It's funny - my US roots are in Manhattan. The lower east side to be specific. Where all 4 of my grandparents lived after they immigrated to the United States at the start of the 20th century. Doubt they would recognize the "scene" there today - but they might recognize some of the tenements . Over the course of 100+ years - various parts/generations of my family have lived in all 5 boroughs. So I've had at least snapshots of a lot of the metro area. Although a lot of those "snapshots" are "vintage". I remember playing in my grandparents' single family house in the Bronx - yes the Bronx - when it was still in part a "suburb" of Manhattan. Robyn

P.S. I recommend a visit to the Ellis Island Museum to anyone who hasn't seen it. Whether you live in the NYC metro area - or on your next trip there.
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Old 06-25-2014, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,990,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
Last time we went to Moma was last summer, so I didn't see the Magritte exhibit, but we did see the rain room in 2013:
MoMA | Rain Room
There are also many suggested admission museums, like the Met, Natural History Museum, Cloisters, so the pass is not a must, although I have known people who had it. I don't know why live here if you don't take advantage to some extent, but we don't eat in expensive restaurants--we'd be more likely to walk over the Brooklyn Bridge and walk on the promenade, fly a kite at Battery Park City, meet friends in Central Park--you get the idea. The only membership I have is the New York Botanical Gardens, because it's only a little more than 5 minutes on foot from me - in fact I was there earlier today to study. Within walking distance, we also have a Little Italy, and an off-Broadway theater. I used to get a pass for the zoo, which also gets you into the aquarium, but the kids are a bit older now and not as interested.

$8,000, really?
IOW - you pretty much stick in/near your neighborhood. Which is what most people do - no matter where they live. Although the desire/ability to range "far and wide" does tend to diminish in a lot of people as they get older. Which means that one's neighborhood becomes even more important.

Nothing wrong with that - and you seem to like your neighborhood. My only point is that I don't think it's realistic for a senior to say I'll move to this part of NYC because it's a part I can afford and because it's *only* a 30 minute subway ride away from the things I want to see/do. You haven't said how old you are - but I would guess maybe in your 40's (based on what you said about your kids). Not a senior. I recall taking my young nieces from Manhattan to the Bronx Zoo on the subway when I was that age (they had never been on a subway before and wanted to "take a ride"). Not something I'd care to do today 25+ years later.

And $8,000 - yup - minimum - in the part of Manhattan I like. Even more (a lot more) if I wanted anything approaching the kind of living space I'm used to these days. FWIW - my aunt looked into the Hallmark in Battery Park City when she was relocating to an independent senior living facility:

Senior Living It Up - WSJ

Not only is the place super expensive - but the area is pretty dead at night and a lot of weekends as well (the area is pretty much business - not residential). And she figured it wouldn't be very easy for her to get from there to her main love in Manhattan - the Met (where she took classes). And to the Botanical Gardens? (we were there a few years ago - very pretty) - forget about it (it's easily > an hour using public transportation). I guess my general attitude as I get older is if/when I move again - it will be to a place where it's easier to get around - not harder (it's not especially hard getting around where I live now). Robyn
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Old 06-25-2014, 06:29 AM
 
2,777 posts, read 3,601,643 times
Reputation: 1380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
There are still some small weird "white enclaves" in NYC. This one popped up on my radar screen after Hurricane Sandy:

Breezy Point, Queens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I've heard rumors in my family (my father and his siblings - those still alive are in their 90's now - grew up in Rockaway Beach - they moved there from the Bronx) that this area was (is?) both anti-semitic and racist - but I have no personal knowledge of the place. Robyn
I've never been to Breezy Point but that's the reputation. There has to be some housing discrimination in any neighborhood that remains so white in my opinion. Breezy Point is very isolated in terms of transportation.

Woodlawn is relatively isolated too, although it has a Metro North stop. People going to the subway need to take a bus there, and neither the metro north or subway stops are accessible. The whole west Bronx and upper Manhattan are very hilly anyway, I imagine more difficult for people with disabilities. I have friends who come visit and are huffing and puffing after a walk here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I remember playing in my grandparents' single family house in the Bronx - yes the Bronx - when it was still in part a "suburb" of Manhattan. Robyn
We have a house here too. Travel time here depends on where you're coming from - midtown would certainly be less than an hour.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
IOW - you pretty much stick in/near your neighborhood. Which is what most people do - no matter where they live. Although the desire/ability to range "far and wide" does tend to diminish in a lot of people as they get older. Which means that one's neighborhood becomes even more important.
Yes, you have the age right--but it would be impossible for us to spend most of our time just hanging out in Manhattan--we're not retired and we both work 5 days/week (my husband in Manhattan and 2 days/week in Manhattan for me). We generally only have the weekends free to do whatever we want--and often not the whole weekend since I often work one of those days. I don't know what we'd do if we had as much free time as a retired person -- I guess we'll find out in 20 plus years. But we still do things with the kids in Manhattan pretty regularly. I'm not saying that a newcomer on a limited budget should live here, but I'm pointing out that living in a borough shouldn't be automatically discounted either. Manhattan is expensive, but the prices you're giving are crazy also.

Last edited by yodel; 06-25-2014 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 06-25-2014, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,875 posts, read 7,840,335 times
Reputation: 9524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I don't know about HIW. But I don't have a phobia. I just dislike being in any big city and doing something like going out for dinner to a nice restaurant in the summer. And arriving at my destination a rumpled sweaty mess. We mostly use cabs in big cities these days. But find that many (and not only in New York) are almost as bad as the subways/buses (a lot of cab drivers are allergic to using their A/C - assuming it works - which it sometimes doesn't).

BTW - you've mentioned that you retired from Houston to Philadelphia. Why not New York? Robyn
Since your dislike of large cities and PT has been discussed exhaustively, I have nothing to add, other than to note this is about the third thread I've seen you go on and on about it it. I suspect this is a hobby horse that's carried you through quite a number of threads.

As you your question "Why not NY?" I guess your missed an earlier post of mine (Post 63 dated June 20). If I wasn't explicit enough, here's a hint: The answer lies behind Door No. 3.
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Old 06-25-2014, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,875 posts, read 7,840,335 times
Reputation: 9524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I'm not phobic about the New York subway. I'm simply unwilling to subject myself to it.

I average a trip to NYC every two or three years. I use cabs or drive myself. I works very well.
Glad to hear you enjoy NYC. If it works for you to avoid The Great Unwashed while doing, sally forth.
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Old 06-25-2014, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,875 posts, read 7,840,335 times
Reputation: 9524
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttface3 View Post
I *still* hear the taunts of rich kids mocking me for living in an apartment and because my mother was a maid.
Part of me can't help wondering if going by the name of "buttface" might have also contributed to such mocking and the resulting painful scars.
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