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Old 08-29-2014, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,860 posts, read 7,809,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
thanks.. we tried more rural by buying a 2nd home in the poconos in pa but that made us realize just how much we really had it all right here in nyc. while we live in queens we are close enough to both the city ,long island and CT to never run out of things to do or places to photograph..
I love pix too, but yours are amazing. Looks like you'll have more time to both take and post them soon.
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Old 08-29-2014, 03:18 PM
 
71,697 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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we sure hope to , we just got back from a fabulous photography trip to montreal shooting some amazing churches.

here are some i posted on city data.

fuji x100s vists montreal.
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Old 08-29-2014, 03:49 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,238,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
gave my notice today i will be retiring fully august 1st and retiring right here in bay terrace queens. have been working just part time the last two months.

nyc has everything we want in retirement including our kids and grandkids.
Congrats, Mathjak - it's about time,

11 months notice? Wow.
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Old 08-29-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,860 posts, read 7,809,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
we sure hope to , we just got back from a fabulous photography trip to montreal shooting some amazing churches.

here are some i posted on city data.

fuji x100s vists montreal.
Been to Montreal ourselves. Yes, there are some beautiful cathedrals. I especially love the sky in the first pic. The buildings in that pic almost looked painted. Also love the apple in the floor of the horse cart.
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Old 08-29-2014, 05:10 PM
 
71,697 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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we had over 1,000 shots in 4 days. it was photography heaven.
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Old 08-29-2014, 08:18 PM
 
8,142 posts, read 8,634,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmenesq View Post
I appreciate all of the responses that my post has generated. I am planning on retiring at about 65 -- though it could be a little earlier or a little later. I keep reminding myself of exactly what rdflk said -- that if I moved to NYC after retirement it would not need to be forever. If I did not like it or if, as I aged or my health declined, I felt the need to relocate again, I could do so, especially as a tenant as opposed to a landowner. I am not wedded to the idea of Manhattan only and am very open to other boroughs to avoid the higher costs of Manhattan. Convenient transportation and safety are, of course, additional considerations. As BrightRabbit has pointed out, I probably would not be looking at rush hour as my prime times of travel as that is one of the advantages of no longer working. Estate taxes do not concern me much, as my estate would be small. My main sources of income would be pension and social security as opposed to investment-based. BrightRabbit's retirement sounds wonderful to me, though I realize that her children are also nearby, which would not be the case in my situation and, of course, she is already familiar with harsh winters, which I am not. LOL
Take a look at some of the towns across the river, such as Fort Lee, NJ.

For the person who said that public transportation is difficult for those who have mobility problems, of course we have residents who need wheelchairs. They can take the bus and some subway stations are also accessible. Your idea of retiring to the NYC area is not unusual at all. Also, many retailers deliver, especially groceries, restaurants (in many different price ranges), and pharmacies.
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Old 08-30-2014, 03:30 AM
 
71,697 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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we found everything has a trade off in life. cheaper areas tend to lack many things that are important and nice to have once you are use to them.

we ended up selling the pocono home because while it looked like a nice beautiful life around lakes and woods was bliss we realized that while cheaper and yes folks do it , it just wasn't for us.

the no public transportation was a big one for us . but the area had few real choices in specialists or medical facilities.

if i wanted to work it offered few jobs and most were tourist industry related or walmart at low pay.

there really was little to do once you took away skiing and water sports. those walks around the lake and walks in the woods got stale pretty quick .boredom all winter was a given.

there were just to few choices to make compared to what we have in nyc. like virginity if that is the only life you knew it is fine and you may have no problem with that lifestyle. but living full time in nyc we soured on that life .

of course the biggest issue is this is where our family is and you can't put a cost on being involved in your grandkids daily lives and not face timing from florida 1000 miles away seeing them only on vacation or holidays..

Last edited by mathjak107; 08-30-2014 at 04:48 AM..
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:55 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,583 posts, read 10,933,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post

When I consider the variety of food offerings here Philly, I can only imagine the offerings of Manhattan. We ate at one such Manhattan venue last weekend when were up there to see a few shows and visit some museums. We made a pilgrimage to one of Manhattan's more popular indoor markets on our visit because it's been announced they are opening an outpost here in Philly: Gourmet Italian Food, Gift Baskets, Pastas, Sauces | Eataly. I may be wrong, but I don't imagine there are a lot of such venues in rural areas such as Wyoming. If I am wrong, it won't be the first time.

There is a trade-off for everything. If a retiree places a high priority on his or her ability to drive to the local national grocery chain, load up the trunk and then unload their haul in their garage, then NYC is of course not the place for them. If, however, they value the ability to buy local food from an international array of vendors, then NYC might be a better fit, as long as they are willing to huff it home.
Rural America is in no way monolithic. We have different climates, cultures, educational levels, wealth, and all of the other same things that create different lifestyles for different sorts of city people as well. I don't have the variey of restaurants that Philadelphis has. In fact, Wyoming has no fine dining. However, I can order all sorts of food to be delivered to my door. Well over a century ago Sears, Ward's, and, perhaps surprisingly, Bloomingdale's catered to rural areas, supplying them with a plethora of merchandise at lower prices than local merchants.

Two phenomena have small-town life both richer and less expensive at the same time. The first was Walmart which brought lower prices for a vast amount of merchandise that previously required either trips to cities or paying extortionate prices to local merchants. The businesses that failed because of Walmart deserved it. Businesses that treated their customers well are still thriving.

Mail order has always been popular in rural America, but until a few years ago it was slow and often aggravating. People mailed checks, then waited an unknown time until the merchandise appeared on their doorsteps. WATS lines and tracking mitigated the problem, but the real revolution was on-line commerce. I can get Forida oranges almost as quickly as you can. Amazon delivers every book in print and many out of print as well as all sorts of other merchandise on the same delivery schedule that they provide to you. Eataly, to whom you provided a link, will happily ship to me. It may surprise you to learn that I can buy Roquefort and Humbolt Fog, my two favorite cheeses, at a local store.

Cities have many thing unavailable to me, but I'm more than willing to give up some good in order to avoid features I consider bad.
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Old 09-03-2014, 03:22 AM
 
71,697 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Congrats, Mathjak - it's about time,

11 months notice? Wow.
yep, i promised i would give them plenty of notice since what i do has a long ramp up learning curve once you even find someone.

i am working part time now so the days i am there i am taking care of the stuff others can't but with those days ending they need to find someone.

i still may give them 1 or 2 days a week to running a training program if we are not off traveling . i enjoy doing technical training and do it now so i may just continue it.

i would be out of the daily work flow and not have to be there if we are traveling so that is a big difference in lifestyle for us.

make a few bucks for the next trip ,take off for a week or two and repeat. sounds like a plan.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:38 AM
 
38,240 posts, read 14,941,272 times
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If you can afford it, retiring to NYC makes wonderful sense.

As others have said, nearby areas might be more affordable. I just looked on CL - a 2 bedroom condo in Union City for $200K with about $600/month in taxes and maintenance. That seems almost unbelievable. But there are $300K condos in nearby Hoboken and I know several people who live there and commute to Manhattan for work and love it.

I think the idea of public transportation, great medical facilities, endless numbers of museums, galleries, restaurants... would be a wonderful way to retire.

Good luck.
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