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Old 09-08-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,869 posts, read 7,820,891 times
Reputation: 9506

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
I don't have to defend my big city life.

I like it and it's for me.

Why?

  • 24 hour public transportation; not being dependent on my car
  • art galleries and museums
  • symphony orchestra and classical music concerts
  • live professional theater ... Broadway caliber
  • jazz clubs
  • breath-taking skyline, skyscrapers, and city views
  • excellent shopping
  • historic neighborhoods and districts
  • nationally televised sports events
  • parades, street fairs, ethnic festivals
  • Chinatown!
  • professional Ballet and Modern Dance
  • foreign and independent film festivals
  • piano bars
  • fine dining and hundreds of ethnic restaurants
  • major universities
  • one of the very best medical infrastructures and world class hospitals
  • public monuments, fountains and statuary
  • gorgeous churches and synagogues
  • people watching in sidewalk cafes, public squares and plazas
  • diverse neighborhoods
  • examples of beautiful architecture
  • science and natural history museums
  • Kosher delicatessens
  • tattoo and piercing convention
  • "Naked Bike Ride"
  • mega July 4th celebration, fireworks
  • poetry readings
  • colorful and eccentric people
  • senior centers with loads of programs and activities
  • stand-up comedy spots
  • 4 star hotels
  • elegant cocktail lounges
  • extensive library system
etc., etc., etc.

Yes, there is a price to pay: higher cost of living, bad neighborhoods and ghettos, urban issues and crime, higher taxes, parking is expensive ... but some of us are willing to pay the price.
Can I hear an AMEN! You sound like someone who wants a bit more from life than next day delivery of duck pâté.
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:49 AM
 
71,873 posts, read 71,942,576 times
Reputation: 49418
those are all the reasons living rural was not for us. except the tattoo convention although i do have tattoos.
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Old 09-09-2014, 04:53 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,596 posts, read 10,952,678 times
Reputation: 19258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
I don't have to defend my big city life.

I like it and it's for me.

Why?

  • 24 hour public transportation; not being dependent on my car
  • art galleries and museums
  • symphony orchestra and classical music concerts
  • live professional theater ... Broadway caliber
  • jazz clubs
  • breath-taking skyline, skyscrapers, and city views
  • excellent shopping
  • historic neighborhoods and districts
  • nationally televised sports events
  • parades, street fairs, ethnic festivals
  • Chinatown!
  • professional Ballet and Modern Dance
  • foreign and independent film festivals
  • piano bars
  • fine dining and hundreds of ethnic restaurants
  • major universities
  • one of the very best medical infrastructures and world class hospitals
  • public monuments, fountains and statuary
  • gorgeous churches and synagogues
  • people watching in sidewalk cafes, public squares and plazas
  • diverse neighborhoods
  • examples of beautiful architecture
  • science and natural history museums
  • Kosher delicatessens
  • tattoo and piercing convention
  • "Naked Bike Ride"
  • mega July 4th celebration, fireworks
  • poetry readings
  • colorful and eccentric people
  • senior centers with loads of programs and activities
  • stand-up comedy spots
  • 4 star hotels
  • elegant cocktail lounges
  • extensive library system
etc., etc., etc.

Yes, there is a price to pay: higher cost of living, bad neighborhoods and ghettos, urban issues and crime, higher taxes, parking is expensive ... but some of us are willing to pay the price.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Can I hear an AMEN! You sound like someone who wants a bit more from life than next day delivery of duck pâté.
It's always good to hear from real boosters; I'm glad that Philadelphis has them. Chicago, land of boosters, has nothing on Philadelphis with you two boosting the city. That tattoo and piercing convention must have been a wonderful event for your city, something folks will remember for years. Don't let people from NYC belittle it. They're jealous that they didn't get it.

Those parades, piano bars, comedy spots, and fireworks really make your city stand out. You must get crowds of New Yorkers coming when they need a dose of culture.

Who cares about duck straight from France or both smoked and salt-cured salmon from New York; you have Philadelphia cheese steak. After dinner you can explore the streets seeking colorful and eccentric people. Do they bathe in public fountains?

I bet the OP will be headed to Philadelphia after she reads your great posts.
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Old 09-09-2014, 05:16 AM
 
71,873 posts, read 71,942,576 times
Reputation: 49418
We took a trip last year to Philadelphia and had a great time.
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Old 09-09-2014, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
It's always good to hear from real boosters; I'm glad that Philadelphis has them. Chicago, land of boosters, has nothing on Philadelphis with you two boosting the city. That tattoo and piercing convention must have been a wonderful event for your city, something folks will remember for years. Don't let people from NYC belittle it. They're jealous that they didn't get it.

Those parades, piano bars, comedy spots, and fireworks really make your city stand out. You must get crowds of New Yorkers coming when they need a dose of culture.

Who cares about duck straight from France or both smoked and salt-cured salmon from New York; you have Philadelphia cheese steak. After dinner you can explore the streets seeking colorful and eccentric people. Do they bathe in public fountains?

I bet the OP will be headed to Philadelphia after she reads your great posts.
Funny . OTOH - for people looking for various things - the list of things in Philadelphia certainly isn't exclusive to Philadelphia. You can find many/most of those things in other metro areas as well. Including tattoo conventions (if they happen to be your cup of tea):

Jacksonville Tattoo Convention - September 2014

The only things that you can't find on the list in my metro area (which is the JAX metro area) are a "Chinatown" - any "gorgeous" synagogues (we have synagogues - but I wouldn't call them "gorgeous") - a Kosher "delicatessen" (although we do have places that sell Kosher food and the only Florida Eruv that's outside SE Florida) or a "naked bike ride" (which sounds seriously uncomfortable to me - especially for guys). OTOH we do have an annual 100+ mile MS bike ride and lots of enthusiastic cyclists who participate in it:

Florida, Ponte Vedra - Bike MS: PGA TOUR Cycle to the Shore 2014 - National MS Society

Also I'm sure many people - no matter where they live - have things that are unusual and/or unique to their particular area. My little suburb - which is located between the Atlantic Ocean (beach) and the intracoastal watererway (boats) - is the home of the PGA Tour and the ATP Americas. And my little county is the home of the oldest city in the US - St. Augustine (even older than Philadelphia ). It also has the #1 school district in the State of Florida (out of 67). Which has turned it into an attractive destination for educated young families with children. I know some retired people don't care about living in age-diverse communities - but I do.

OTOH - this area continues to attract younger retirees who still enjoy being active - but want some amenities that you'll only find in a metro area. There aren't many places in the world where you can play 18 holes of championship golf in the morning - grab some lunch - see your doctor at the Mayo Clinic - then drop into the Town Center for a bit of shopping (hundreds of stores - everything from Target to Tiffany) and a nice dinner - and then catch a symphony concert in the evening. You could theoretically have a day like that here - but it would be too much for me. Robyn

P.S. BTW - for anyone who poo-poos the idea of buying from D'Artagnan or Hudson Valley - where do you think higher end restaurants buy their foie gras? Higher end restaurants also buy from places like Niman Ranch (meat) - Jamison Farm (lamb) - Rogue Creamery (cheese) - etc. And - with on-line shopping - you can buy food stuffs from the original sources (just like restaurants do).

Last edited by Robyn55; 09-09-2014 at 07:29 AM..
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Old 09-09-2014, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
...Yes, there is a price to pay: higher cost of living, bad neighborhoods and ghettos, urban issues and crime, higher taxes, parking is expensive ... but some of us are willing to pay the price.
These are factors that may/may not come into play whether an area is urban - suburban or rural. There are suburban and even some rural areas that are more/much more expensive than some urban areas. There are "bad" neighborhoods/crime in some suburban/rural areas too. And things like property and state income taxes vary considerably without regard to the character of a place (they depend on the value of your property - your income - etc.). In all cases - it's pretty much a cost/benefit analysis - where people almost always have to balance what they want against what they can afford. I suspect if money were no object - you'd be living in Manhattan - not Philadelphia - with a winter place somewhere warm.

On my part - I'd want a summer place - but I really don't know where. Also - the older I get - the less the thought of having 2 places appeals to me (too much work - OTOH - as long as I'm dreaming - I can dream I'm a billionaire and can afford to have a staff that takes care of my summer place for me ). Robyn
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Old 09-09-2014, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
We took a trip last year to Philadelphia and had a great time.
That's one thing you still can't do on line - travel. We usually take trips to big cities a couple of times a year. Really big cities. Almost always have a really good time. We've been to Tokyo recently - and we're off to Singapore in a few weeks. We were also in Houston a few months back. That's a big city in terms of population - but not that urban IMO. OTOH - we wanted to do 2 specific things there. Go to a particular art exhibit - and explore the new (pretty exciting) local restaurant scene. Liked both of those things - so we really enjoyed our trip.

I think if dining is important to someone (and it is to me) - you have to be prepared to travel as much as possible to explore different cuisines. Sure I could get BBQ in New York - or Japanese food in Philadelphia - but I'd rather get Texas BBQ in Texas and Japanese food in Japan. Because - if you're going to travel to eat - you might as well get the best.

When it comes to travel - it's nice to be near a good airport. I am pretty much out of touch with NYC airports these days. How are they? Last time I hubbed through Newark - it was pretty old fashioned (you had to leave a secure area upon arrival and then go through security to enter another secure area to depart). My favorite airport to hub through these days is Atlanta (busiest airport in the world - but most parts - including the new international terminal - are and one rarely encounters delays). Also - once you get away from the handful of major gateway airports in the US - places like Newark - JFK - Atlanta - Chicago - Los Angeles - etc. - we're all pretty much in the same boat when it comes to flights - we have to hub through somewhere to go to a place like Tokyo or Singapore. Robyn
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Old 09-09-2014, 10:56 AM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,592 posts, read 12,357,889 times
Reputation: 15500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post

I think if dining is important to someone (and it is to me) - you have to be prepared to travel as much as possible to explore different cuisines. Sure I could get BBQ in New York - or Japanese food in Philadelphia - but I'd rather get Texas BBQ in Texas and Japanese food in Japan. Because - if you're going to travel to eat - you might as well get the best.

Robyn
Not always, Robyn.

I love Thai food but I have to admit that the best Tom Kha Gai (a chicken soup made with coconut milk, lemongrass, Kaffir limes, etc.) I ever had was not in Thailand, but in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia! The restaurant owners were Malay, not Thai. The very best "Cuban" sandwiches you can get are in Miami ... not Havana (I know, I foraging all over Havana looking for a "Cuban" or a "Media Noche" sandwich as good as you can get in Miami).
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,869 posts, read 7,820,891 times
Reputation: 9506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
The only things that you can't find on the list in my metro area (which is the JAX metro area) are a "Chinatown" - any "gorgeous" synagogues (we have synagogues - but I wouldn't call them "gorgeous") - a Kosher "delicatessen" (although we do have places that sell Kosher food and the only Florida Eruv that's outside SE Florida) or a "naked bike ride" (which sounds seriously uncomfortable to me - especially for guys).
LOL. I think it was the first year we lived here (2011) and I looked out our window and saw a street filled with bike riders as far as the eye could see. I called out to my husband: "Look at all the bike riders!" Then I did a double take and said "LOOK at all the bike riders!!" From what we could tell from the vantage point of our balcony, this is an event that's best seen from a distance. And I had the same thought as you about the male riders.

Further, I fully agree with this bolded comment:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I'm sure many people - no matter where they live - have things that are unusual and/or unique to their particular area. My little suburb - which is located between the Atlantic Ocean (beach) and the intracoastal watererway (boats) - is the home of the PGA Tour and the ATP Americas. And my little county is the home of the oldest city in the US - St. Augustine (even older than Philadelphia ).
Your comment is one of the key reasons I like to travel and explore. On all my trips to Florida, I have not yet been to St Augustine though I've heard it's quite charming with all of Spanish influenced architecture. I am sure we will get there at some point. Your comment reminded me of a recent list of 31 of Philly's unique offerings complied by the Huffington Post: 31 Reasons Philadelphia Is The Most Underrated City In America. I would love to learn more about the unique and quirky charms of JAX.

Oooops, I had to edit this. I don't see how anyone could draw up a list of "offerings" unique to Philly and overlook the mummers:









Finally, I also agree with this sentiment:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I think if dining is important to someone (and it is to me) - you have to be prepared to travel as much as possible to explore different cuisines. Sure I could get BBQ in New York - or Japanese food in Philadelphia - but I'd rather get Texas BBQ in Texas and Japanese food in Japan. Because - if you're going to travel to eat - you might as well get the best.
We have been fortunate in being able to travel quite a bit - domestically and internationally, and being foodies, we love to eat like the locals. But for those without the means to travel, it is wonderful to have immigrants who bring their cuisine to your city, if you are lucky enough to live in a a culturally diverse locale.

Enjoy Singapore. I've been there twice. It's quite western, as you probably know. Perhaps you'll report your impressions back to us when you return. Bon voyage

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 09-09-2014 at 03:11 PM.. Reason: add Mummers!
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,869 posts, read 7,820,891 times
Reputation: 9506
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
We took a trip last year to Philadelphia and had a great time.
And we had a great time when we were in Manhattan a few weeks back. We spent the weekend as always, trying to cram in as much theatre as we could. When we weren't in the theatre, we went to MoMA, the area around Lincoln Center, a stroll through Central Park and down 5th Avenue, and a walk on the HighLine (we try to get there on every visit). We also checked out three NYC businesses that have announced they are opening outposts here in Philly: Eataly, Century 21 and Big Gay Ice Cream.

Apparently you aren't the only New Yorker who pays an occasional visit down our way. The New York Times every so often publishes an article on the best way to spend 36 hours in Philly. Here is the most recent: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/06/tr...hia.html?_r=2&. Perhaps you visited or ate at some of these spots?

Also, the Times has reported on the first lgbt jazz festival in America, to be held soon right here in Philly. So not everything happens only in New York (as I know you are aware, mathjak): http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/20...ype=blogs&_r=0. It's so great that the cities are only 90 minutes apart by train so we can take advantage of what each has to offer.
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