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Old 09-09-2014, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,947,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
Not always, Robyn.

I love Thai food but I have to admit that the best Tom Kha Gai (a chicken soup made with coconut milk, lemongrass, Kaffir limes, etc.) I ever had was not in Thailand, but in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia! The restaurant owners were Malay, not Thai. The very best "Cuban" sandwiches you can get are in Miami ... not Havana (I know, I foraging all over Havana looking for a "Cuban" or a "Media Noche" sandwich as good as you can get in Miami).
I think some SE Asian cuisines are overlapping (like Malay and Thai). At least in terms of some cooking ingredients and techniques. Reckon I'll learn more about that in Singapore.

It's not fair to compare a Cuban sandwich you can get in a first world country/city with a large Cuban American population - like Miami - or Union City NJ - with what you can get in a second world country like Cuba. People don't in general have the same money to spend on food/run restaurants/etc. Robyn
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Old 09-10-2014, 10:01 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,919 posts, read 1,594,641 times
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Don't know if you mentioned how long you are staying in SNG Robyn, but to my tastes a few days will do it, 4-5 tops ... not much to see other than the food courts, lots of high end expensive malls with all the same brands we have here, have a drink at Raffles & walk around a bit.

I would give serious thought to consider a trip nearby, say to Penang or KL or to a nice resort island like Langkawi, if you are staying more than 4 days.

BTW Singapore is the only city in the world I would say to allow for a lot of time at the airport for departure because it is the best airport in the world hands down, lots to do there believe it or not!
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,815,386 times
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^^^ My feeling exactly. I visited Singapore twice on business. On my first trip, I built in a few extra days for personal exploration. It was plenty. I did a city tour along with a night time tour of the zoo (quite interesting actually), but aside from that, I don't have any particularly outstanding memories. I suppose if one is a shopper (I'm not), Singapore might offer a good concentration of brand-name stores. On my second trip, I was more than content to simply conduct my business and get on the plane to come home.

We are all different, however, and we seek different experiences from our travels. That's the reason that I asked Robyn to share her impressions after her vacation. I'd like to see what others have found in Singapore that are interesting to them.
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Old 09-10-2014, 07:35 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,676,474 times
Reputation: 8726
Our son and DIL had a wedding celebration in Singapore, they were legally married in MD and a year later the family (mainly from England) gathered to celebrate with them in Singapore. At that time DIL's parents were teaching at an English school there. They rented an apartment for us to use for the three weeks we were there. We spent time running errands for the upcoming celebration and sightseeing. We loved the food courts, ate in an alley in Little India, did Raffles, temples, etc. The Festival of Lights (? Diwali) was going on while we were there, so festivities in that part of town, with makeshift markets erected that we went to. International rugby teams were there to compete one weekend and that was fun watching the short matches.

Her parents had been living there for a couple of years and knew all the places to go and we went! The celebration took place on Bintan, a resort 40 minutes from Singapore via high speed ferry, which was lovely. There were Balinese dancers and drummers for the event, and a Komodo dragon in the villa pool one morning free of charge.

At that time, 2005, Singapore Air had a flight from Newark to Singapore non-stop that was 18.5 hours, we flew on that and I just learned the other day it is/was the longest scheduled flight for a commercial jet. Changi Airport is quite amazing.

We came from NY in late October and came into the heat and humidity of Singapore. With all the nonstop activity I quickly became dehydrated and didn't realize it at first. We walked a lot, but taxis were cheap and we used those too. Still, my output was more than I was drinking.

Singapore is incredibly clean because of their draconian laws that have severe punishments for littering, stealing etc. drugs are a hanging offense. We left packages/laptops on the sidewalk going into temples and they were there coming back out.

I have wonderful memories of it all, having DIL's parents taking charge of our itinerary made it easy and interesting. We also went on the honeymoon with the kids and the other parents to Bali in an out of the way place owned by an ex-pat Brit couple. But that's another story.

Last edited by jean_ji; 09-10-2014 at 07:52 PM..
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Old 09-12-2014, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,815,386 times
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Default Back to the thread topic

As happens, we have wandered away from the thread topic. It is about retiring in NYC, not traveling to Singapore. So . . . a few pages back, one of our rural posters implied in his/her post that buying groceries in a city entails logistics just too burdensome for the average retiree. As a retiree living in a city, I replied "Of course not." No, it's not as simple as driving to the local Kroger and unloading groceries from one's garage. Presumably a person retiring to a large urban city already knows that. But it's not that daunting either: a few tote bags or a rolling cart are all that are needed. And the trade-off is that the variety of foodstuffs available in any city is beyond what one might dream of out in the country.

One of our favorite places to shop in Philly is the Reading Terminal Market. Among other vendors, it houses butchers, bakers, fishmongers, green grocers, delis, cheese and specialty shops, flower shops and restaurants featuring just about every cuisine under the sun. Also, it houses Amish vendors who offer food and goods of just about every stripe. If you can't find it at Reading Terminal, you probably can't find it. We love to shop there. It's like the old days in that we stop by our favorite butcher then cart those purchases to the baker, pick up bread then move onto the green grocer, etc, slowly filing our tote bags as we go. Along the way, a pastry or two has been known to mysteriously find its way in our bag from time to time - go figure? And rather than go only once a week, we are more than happy to walk there a few times during the week so that everything we prepare is fresh. The market is so large and filled with nearly edible good imaginable that it is actually one of the city's top tourists stops. Here's a link for anyone that is interested: Home - Reading Terminal Market.

Given the nature of some of the naysayers here, I know they will be quick to gleefully cluck "What happens when you get too old to cart your groceries?" (as if people never get to old to drive to the local chain). Well, good news on that front. Urban dwellers can already have groceries delivered from many chains. The trend is now to go beyond the chains. Delivery will soon be available to Philly residents from the Reading Terminal Market within the hour: Instacart to offer one-hour delivery from Reading Terminal Market. If NYC's little brother down the road offers such conveniences, I'm sure it has something similar in place.

To anyone reading this thread who dreams of retiring to NYC or another city, don't be swayed by the naysayers.
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Old 09-12-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,756,785 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
As happens, we have wandered away from the thread topic. It is about retiring in NYC, not traveling to Singapore. So . . . a few pages back, one of our rural posters implied in his/her post that buying groceries in a city entails logistics just too burdensome for the average retiree. As a retiree living in a city, I replied "Of course not." No, it's not as simple as driving to the local Kroger and unloading groceries from one's garage. Presumably a person retiring to a large urban city already knows that. But it's not that daunting either: a few tote bags or a rolling cart are all that are needed. And the trade-off is that the variety of foodstuffs available in any city is beyond what one might dream of out in the country.

One of our favorite places to shop in Philly is the Reading Terminal Market. Among other vendors, it houses butchers, bakers, fishmongers, green grocers, delis, cheese and specialty shops, flower shops and restaurants featuring just about every cuisine under the sun. Also, it houses Amish vendors who offer food and goods of just about every stripe. If you can't find it at Reading Terminal, you probably can't find it. We love to shop there. It's like the old days in that we stop by our favorite butcher then cart those purchases to the baker, pick up bread then move onto the green grocer, etc, slowly filing our tote bags as we go. Along the way, a pastry or two has been known to mysteriously find its way in our bag from time to time - go figure? And rather than go only once a week, we are more than happy to walk there a few times during the week so that everything we prepare is fresh. The market is so large and filled with nearly edible good imaginable that it is actually one of the city's top tourists stops. Here's a link for anyone that is interested: Home - Reading Terminal Market.

Given the nature of some of the naysayers here, I know they will be quick to gleefully cluck "What happens when you get too old to cart your groceries?" (as if people never get to old to drive to the local chain). Well, good news on that front. Urban dwellers can already have groceries delivered from many chains. The trend is now to go beyond the chains. Delivery will soon be available to Philly residents from the Reading Terminal Market within the hour: Instacart to offer one-hour delivery from Reading Terminal Market. If NYC's little brother down the road offers such conveniences, I'm sure it has something similar in place.

To anyone reading this thread who dreams of retiring to NYC or another city, don't be swayed by the naysayers.
Good points. If one has the money to live in NYC, all the other "problems" are solvable. If one cannot afford to live there, then one should not try to, as it seems to me only frustration would result.

What a great place it would be for people who do not like to drive. (I love driving, but I do understand that some people hate it as much as I love it.)
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Old 09-13-2014, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,815,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Good points. If one has the money to live in NYC, all the other "problems" are solvable. If one cannot afford to live there, then one should not try to, as it seems to me only frustration would result.

What a great place it would be for people who do not like to drive. (I love driving, but I do understand that some people hate it as much as I love it.)
Thanks. Of course NYC isn't any different from any other place when it comes to living within one's limits. It wouldn't be wise to live in Santa Barbara, West Palm Beach or even Paducah if a person doesn't have the means to enjoy a comfortable life there.

As for driving, we are different from you - we don't like it. We used to live in Houston where it is essential for each adult in a household to have a car, because even the simplest of errands requires driving. In retirement, we wanted to move to a city where is is possible to live day-to-day without a car. When we moved to Philly, we sold one car but did hold onto the other. Many weeks, the only time that car is used is to drive to and from a volunteer activity I take on that is 8 miles from our home. Other than that, we walk for pretty much everything we want or need to do: groceries, drug stores, restaurants, theater, performing arts, museums, movies, college campus lectures, etc. We even walk to our physician's and dentist's office as well as our specialists' offices! We considered getting rid of the car and using Zipcar, but we like to have it for weekend get-aways, day trips or occasions when we want to make a big box run. Though we could use Zipcar for those kind of ventures, we felt it would take away from some of the spontaneity of heading off to a nearby park or historic site on a beautiful morning when the spirit strikes. The car is paid for and we like it, so no biggie. And, because we put so little mileage on it, our insurance premiums are quite low - even lower that we paid in Houston.

When considering the cost of city living, yes - it is higher than most places, and few cities are more expensive than NYC. But if a person can live car-free, there are savings that can be taken into consideration, as one can say goodbye to car payments, gas, upkeep, registration and insurance. Even with a car already paid off, it can cost several thousands of dollars to keep a car on the road each year, so the savings are not insignificant. By ridding ourselves of one car and limiting use of the other, it's been nice to have those savings in our pocket for activities we find more enjoyable than siting in traffic.
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Old 09-13-2014, 12:08 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,999,418 times
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The fact is it cost more to live having basics in many. large expensive cities. Luckily I hate living in such places.
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Old 09-13-2014, 10:44 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,919 posts, read 1,594,641 times
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It is funny how each of us have different ideas about the kind of place we want to be happy getting old in, count me in with the city folk, but I certainly don't hate living in a more rural area if there is some access to nearby culture & sevices. I do dislike suburbs however.

I am on the brink of starting retirement in NYC, I returned 20 years ago & I enjoy it for all the usual mentioned reasons & I have a good handle on day to day costs. But It's the taxes, including state & city, that I will have to keep an eye on the next few years to see if I can continue here going forward without them & inflation bleeding me too much in the future.
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Old 10-26-2014, 07:00 PM
 
9 posts, read 9,968 times
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Red face City, Suburbs, or Rural

We currently live in North Jersey, about 20-25 minutes from downtown with no traffic. Yes, I know that that just doesn't happen in this area. Of course, there is always the train or the bus too. My husband will be retiring in approximately 2 years. I've been researching on where to retire. He and I have different thoughts on what we want. I'm trying to make us both happy and mentioned the idea of snowbirds. I'd like to stay accessible to NYC and our children. He wants to head south. This board just makes me even more determined to stay in this area even if it is for just part of the year. I don't like the snow and cold either.
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