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Old 06-17-2014, 09:15 PM
 
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Amazing how so many here can down NYC. I think NY is the greatest city in the world, with some of the friendliest people in the world. If I had the money, I would live there in a heartbeat. If money is tight, I suggest two less expensive alternatives that fit the bill, Boston and Philadelphia. I recommend these two cities because the location (an hour to the ocean and an hour or two to the mountains) and climate is similar to NYC, there is loads of culture and plenty to do in each, and one could easily live without a car in either city, as lots of people do. Philadelphia is kind of a smaller NYC that still has ethnic neighborhoods, Russian, Italian, etc. What makes these three cities so special for one who wants to live without a car is the regional rail. The busses and subways are fine for getting around the city, but with regional rail one can go anywhere in the metro area, even from one city to another, such as from Philly to NYC on SEPTA and NJ Transit, and even take the train to the beach.
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Old 06-18-2014, 12:47 AM
 
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If you can afford it, NYC seems like it would be a great place to retire. It's easy to get around and a lot to do. My parents retired and moved into a suburban cul de sac filled with a bunch of other retirees who all have nothing to do. It's a headache to even walk to get some air, and impossible to walk somewhere to buy food or a magazine. They already seem super bored and it's only been a week. Their neighbors sit in lawn chairs in their garages and stare at each other. It's only a matter of time before my dad starts doing the same. My mom spends a lot of time re-arranging her kitchen cupboards. Seems like a very strange way to live.
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Old 06-18-2014, 03:19 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
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Originally Posted by james777 View Post
Amazing how so many here can down NYC. I think NY is the greatest city in the world, with some of the friendliest people in the world. If I had the money, I would live there in a heartbeat. If money is tight, I suggest two less expensive alternatives that fit the bill, Boston and Philadelphia. I recommend these two cities because the location (an hour to the ocean and an hour or two to the mountains) and climate is similar to NYC, there is loads of culture and plenty to do in each, and one could easily live without a car in either city, as lots of people do. Philadelphia is kind of a smaller NYC that still has ethnic neighborhoods, Russian, Italian, etc. What makes these three cities so special for one who wants to live without a car is the regional rail. The busses and subways are fine for getting around the city, but with regional rail one can go anywhere in the metro area, even from one city to another, such as from Philly to NYC on SEPTA and NJ Transit, and even take the train to the beach.

I also agree Philly is another alternative. Either way they are all very walkable cities. All three have so much to offer and if you can afford the initial entry I believe that they are livable for someone that has a higher then average income. I mean you will have to have more then SS income even if you use a nest egg to buy in. That is unless you want to live in areas that are prone to troubles.

Oh rzzz your parents will need to do their own thing and maybe get the neighbors up off their butts and moving. I don't know them but I can tell you I would be one to start a group of movers and shakers.
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Old 06-18-2014, 05:11 AM
 
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I love NYC. I grew up just north of the city and have wonderful memories of spending weekends in museums and Central Park. That said, I think you are underestimating the cost of even a tiny studio apartment in a decent area, not to mention other expenses. My suggestion would be to live in one of the smaller cities within an hour of the city and take the train down to the city. There are very areas within an hour of the city that would offer you a community feel and things to do, but also a more affordable cost of living.
One other thing to consider is that everyone else in NYC is also looking for that reasonably priced studio apartment that you are looking for; also, many apartments are snapped up by word of mouth before they are even advertised.
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Old 06-18-2014, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
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Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Living in NYC will certainly give you things to do, for example, how to get someone to fix your plumbing after your toilet's been clogged for a week. That's not a problem if you live at the high end but a major problem at the low end where you'll unfortunately be in that very expensive place. Do you ever watch movies or television shows set there. Don't most of the places look like either dumps or very expensive? Go for a trip. Be sure to go outside after dark in a quiet neighborhood; you won't stay out long. Except in Manhattan and a very few other areas you will need a car. And don't forget that New Yorkers are not known for friendliness.

How often do you attend opera, live theater, etc.?

You can stay in FL without a car and in a safe and pleasant environment. Check out The Villages. Cars aren't necessary; there are shuttle buses as well as roads for golf carts. There's plenty of shopping right there and I know someone wuld be happy to take you along to Walmart. It wouldn't be my kind of place, way too urban, way too humid, but you'd probably be very comfortable since you've spent your life in the South. You certainly wouldn't be worried about the bad element. They have inexpensive visits for four to seven days; you should definitely try one.

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Oh yeah that sounds like a wonderfull place to retire O/P keep looking at NYC imo

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Old 06-18-2014, 08:11 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Personally I would consider retirement in NYC, because I'm a native-speaker of Russian, and crave immersion in a Russian-speaking (immigrant) community. New York offers the largest such community in the Western Hemisphere. Were it not for that factor, I'd look for other large cities, with urban amenities but lower costs. Why? Because the principal downside of NYC is the high state and local income taxes. We've had innumerable debates on this Forum regarding what drives cost of living. For every person the situation is different. For me, it's taxes.
The russian-speaking communities (I'm thinking of Brighton Beach in particular) aren't that expensive, at least for NYC standards. Though pricey for Ohio standards. Would income taxes matter less if you're retired?
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Old 06-18-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
The russian-speaking communities (I'm thinking of Brighton Beach in particular) aren't that expensive, at least for NYC standards. Though pricey for Ohio standards. Would income taxes matter less if you're retired?
Brighton Beach is actually in Brooklyn
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Old 06-18-2014, 08:43 AM
 
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I think it's an EXCELLENT idea, one that I plan to do myself when my husband and I retire in 25ish years. I am a nearly lifelong resident of South FL who lived in NYC for most of my 20s. There are few cities that have more amenities ideally suited to someone retired than NYC: culture and entertainment, access to food and restaurants, access to healthcare as well as robust public transportation as well as the ability to have just about everything delivered (from food to laundry/dry cleaning) make it far better than, say, South Florida on just about every note.

Especially if you're willing to consider a small studio (and especially in a non-prime location) and can do without a car, your living expenses can be equal to or lower than they would be in other retirement meccas with far better quality of living. I say go for it-- you can always backtrack and move back to FL if it doesn't work out in the way you had hoped. Best of luck to you!
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:36 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
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You will never know unless you try. I wouldn't move to a town outside of NYC. Any housing close to trains will be pricey and you'll have to get to the train, not easy without a car unless you are near the station and again it will be more money in a good area or if it isn't costly, it will be in a bad area. Catching a train and having to get back will make it like flying in for a visit. You more than likely won't be going into the city as much because of the commute time, money and effort, depending on where you live, which defeats the goal of your dream.
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
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You're going to have to do a lot of research into neighborhoods and buildings. I went back for an extended stay by myself at my son's studio apt after many years away and had the absolute time of my life running all over the city. Lots of free days at museums and bus in either direction right outside the door. He was paying about $2500 a month in lower Manhattan with elevator and doorman. The building was bought out and the cost to buy in was twice what he was paying. It wasn't far from my old neighborhood with turn of the century buildings but they were all walkups (1-6th floor). One bldg had the toilets in the hallway. The other thing about his locale was there were lots of trendy restaurants nearby. The downside was the extremely loud garbage trucks that serviced them at 3 to 5 am. Impossible to sleep. I'd suggest checking into the upper west side or places like Peter Cooper Village. Jersey City would need even more scrutiny with a lot of areas that are sketchy. If you do make the move you will need to be comfortable living around all kinds of people and aware of your surroundings both at home and when out. I'd consider it myself if I could afford it.

I live near the Villages that someone else pointed out. One of the pluses was the ability to get to so many necessary places by golf cart should I need to in the future. I like living with ranches nearby and the ability of a day trip to the beach if I want. The homes in the Villages themselves are rather expensive I think. Most people are long time couples who have a lot of equity. Places adjacent are more reasonable but still limited to homes. It is a great place to live for entertainment, services, shopping, medical, and low crime. People here are from all over if you don't mind, or prefer an older yet active set. Of course it won't be like living in NYC but then again few places will be.
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