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Old 06-20-2014, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716

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Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
I think o/p stated her reasons. There are many 75 plus seniors residing in NY doing just fine!
Florida is NOT everyone's utopia.

Brooklyn isn't Manhattan but it has more of an urban vibe than Staten Island or Queens and plenty of nice neighborhoods.
And there are many who aren't doing fine. Note that I'm not talking about people perhaps in their 60's or early 70's - but people in their late 70's or older.

I think people in Florida (and similar places) tend to be out of touch in terms of what it actually means to use public transportation in a crowded urban area. We usually visit at least one such place once a year. Last year was Tokyo. We find that we're increasingly unable to handle public transportation (which is much better in Tokyo than New York) - because my husband needs a big leg brace and cane to walk. If he needed a walker - it would be impossible. Even in a relatively small less crowded city like Stockholm - my husband had a nasty fall when a trolley started with a lurch before he was able to get to a seat.

Also - people outside places like NYC tend to forget that things many of us take for granted - like laundry facilities in our places (not laundry rooms in the basement) and kitchens larger than broom closets can be hard to find in less than luxury buildings in NYC. I still have family in NYC - and am amazed what they're paying for various places.

Also - people like my aunt (before she moved to a senior independent living place) - found herself shut in for days/weeks on end - especially in the winter. She couldn't handle snowy/slushy/icy sidewalks/streets safely. And this was after she had 2 total knee replacements that allowed her to walk without any assistive devices. Her neighbors were very nice in terms of grocery shopping for her when she couldn't go out - but didn't provide much in the way of friendship/companionship (they were much much younger people and didn't have anything in common with my aunt).

As for Brooklyn - my niece moved from Brooklyn to Manhattan. The nice parts of Brooklyn/nice places there (and she lived in a nice part/nice place) are right up there in terms in price - although still less expensive than Manhattan.

I have family on Staten Island too - and the part where they live is pretty suburban (single family houses). And hilly too. The part of my family that used to live in Queens has either died or left. Think you're right about the lack of an "urban vibe" in those areas.

My parents grew up in the Bronx - and I know it pretty much went to the dogs. Don't know if any part of it has come back over the years/decades. Last time I was there was perhaps 5 years ago - the botanical gardens. Friends of ours who live on the upper east side drove us there in their car (they wouldn't have dreamt of using the subway). We don't have much left in the way of friends/family in NYC these days. But everyone we do know (except for my niece) - people our age - has a car. And a space in a parking garage too (they live in condos and bought their places/parking spaces when things were - although not cheap - a lot cheaper). None has ever considered living without a car - even in Manhattan. IOW - this idea of living without a car is kind of a pipe dream. Upper middle class people and higher in Manhattan don't do it. And - in all honesty - unless you're upper middle class or higher income - nice places in Manhattan - and even in Brooklyn - aren't going to be affordable.

Anyway - I recommend that anyone considering this spend at least 4 weeks in a hotel (or perhaps an airbnb place) in a neighborhood one could afford to live in (which - for most people - won't be the upper east side ) - half in January/February and half in July/August. Do a reality check. Robyn
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Old 06-20-2014, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,886,776 times
Reputation: 11146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
And there are many who aren't doing fine. Note that I'm not talking about people perhaps in their 60's or early 70's - but people in their late 70's or older.

I think people in Florida (and similar places) tend to be out of touch in terms of what it actually means to use public transportation in a crowded urban area. We usually visit at least one such place once a year. Last year was Tokyo. We find that we're increasingly unable to handle public transportation (which is much better in Tokyo than New York) - because my husband needs a big leg brace and cane to walk. If he needed a walker - it would be impossible. Even in a relatively small less crowded city like Stockholm - my husband had a nasty fall when a trolley started with a lurch before he was able to get to a seat.

Also - people outside places like NYC tend to forget that things many of us take for granted - like laundry facilities in our places (not laundry rooms in the basement) and kitchens larger than broom closets can be hard to find in less than luxury buildings in NYC. I still have family in NYC - and am amazed what they're paying for various places.

Also - people like my aunt (before she moved to a senior independent living place) - found herself shut in for days/weeks on end - especially in the winter. She couldn't handle snowy/slushy/icy sidewalks/streets safely. And this was after she had 2 total knee replacements that allowed her to walk without any assistive devices. Her neighbors were very nice in terms of grocery shopping for her when she couldn't go out - but didn't provide much in the way of friendship/companionship (they were much much younger people and didn't have anything in common with my aunt).

As for Brooklyn - my niece moved from Brooklyn to Manhattan. The nice parts of Brooklyn/nice places there (and she lived in a nice part/nice place) are right up there in terms in price - although still less expensive than Manhattan.

I have family on Staten Island too - and the part where they live is pretty suburban (single family houses). And hilly too. The part of my family that used to live in Queens has either died or left. Think you're right about the lack of an "urban vibe" in those areas.

My parents grew up in the Bronx - and I know it pretty much went to the dogs. Don't know if any part of it has come back over the years/decades. Last time I was there was perhaps 5 years ago - the botanical gardens. Friends of ours who live on the upper east side drove us there in their car (they wouldn't have dreamt of using the subway). We don't have much left in the way of friends/family in NYC these days. But everyone we do know (except for my niece) - people our age - has a car. And a space in a parking garage too (they live in condos and bought their places/parking spaces when things were - although not cheap - a lot cheaper). None has ever considered living without a car - even in Manhattan. IOW - this idea of living without a car is kind of a pipe dream. Upper middle class people and higher in Manhattan don't do it. And - in all honesty - unless you're upper middle class or higher income - nice places in Manhattan - and even in Brooklyn - aren't going to be affordable.

Anyway - I recommend that anyone considering this spend at least 4 weeks in a hotel (or perhaps an airbnb place) in a neighborhood one could afford to live in (which - for most people - won't be the upper east side ) - half in January/February and half in July/August. Do a reality check. Robyn
O/P asked about NYC not FL, she already lives there and is looking to escape and can't say as I blame her
Many seniors do fine in urban areas. You talk about being house bound because of bad weather well guess you can become house bound in FL as well when you become a menace on the roads and should not be driving anymore.
There are plenty of MIDDLE CLASS doing just fine in NY. Not every one has to be hoity toity wealthy snobs who wouldn't dream of using the subways to reside there..sheesh
Many NYer's do NOT own a car, when they want to get out of town they rent a zip car.

Also don't recall seeing anyone suggesting the Upper East Side to o/p...we know the hoity toity peeps live there
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Old 06-20-2014, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
I actually think the less mobile you are the more important being in a big city is. NYC is walkable as is a good majority of the large cities. The more attractive a city from an economic stand point the more expensive housing is going to be. On the other hand that expense does allow for lower expenses in things like transportation. If you live in a city you have a better chance for decent public transportation. Also there are services in the cities for elderly and disabled with chartered vans and buses. So many more services. It is something worth considering.
There are many counties in Florida that have senior/disabled public transit (like Duval County/JAX to the north of us). Our county is much smaller in terms of population than most counties in Florida. And - until recently - was largely rural. So I don't think we have services like that - could be wrong. If anyone plans on using any service like this - anywhere - best to give it a "test drive" first (things that look good on paper often don't deliver what they promise).

Also - I think it's easy to pop fantasy balloons by looking at balloon popping rents. E.g.,

Apartments for rent

Finally - various people here have mentioned the "old days" in New York - the days when some of our parents grew up there - and some have countered with the current realities of living there today. Looking at current demographic stats is the easiest way to get a snapshot of things today. Here's the Bronx:

Bronx County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Here's Brooklyn:

Kings County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Queens:

Queens County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Manhattan:

New York County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

And Staten Island:

Richmond County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

No borough other than Staten Island is > 50% white/non-Hispanic. In all boroughs - a substantial % of households and sometimes a majority speak a language other than English at home. All boroughs have large/very large percentages of people born outside the US. IOW - it's kind of like Miami - without palm trees <LOL>. And most people - even those in Florida - wouldn't think of living in Miami in a million years - because it's too "foreign". Don't know if the OP and others had taken the demographics of the city into account - but they're worth a look IMO. Robyn
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Old 06-20-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,886,776 times
Reputation: 11146
O/P just to give you an idea, plenty of studios here on the upper west side under $2K

Citi-Habitats New York City Apartments - NYC Apartments - Manhattan Lofts, Real Estate Rental
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Old 06-20-2014, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,886,776 times
Reputation: 11146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
There are many counties in Florida that have senior/disabled public transit (like Duval County/JAX to the north of us). Our county is much smaller in terms of population than most counties in Florida. And - until recently - was largely rural. So I don't think we have services like that - could be wrong. If anyone plans on using any service like this - anywhere - best to give it a "test drive" first (things that look good on paper often don't deliver what they promise).

Also - I think it's easy to pop fantasy balloons by looking at balloon popping rents. E.g.,

Apartments for rent

Finally - various people here have mentioned the "old days" in New York - the days when some of our parents grew up there - and some have countered with the current realities of living there today. Looking at current demographic stats is the easiest way to get a snapshot of things today. Here's the Bronx:

Bronx County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Here's Brooklyn:

Kings County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Queens:

Queens County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Manhattan:

New York County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

And Staten Island:

Richmond County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

No borough other than Staten Island is > 50% white/non-Hispanic. In all boroughs - a substantial % of households and sometimes a majority speak a language other than English at home. All boroughs have large/very large percentages of people born outside the US. IOW - it's kind of like Miami - without palm trees <LOL>. And most people - even those in Florida - wouldn't think of living in Miami in a million years - because it's too "foreign". Don't know if the OP and others had taken the demographics of the city into account - but they're worth a look IMO. Robyn
Okay....^^^^^^
That's the beauty of NYC
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Old 06-20-2014, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
O/P asked about NYC not FL, she already lives there and is looking to escape and can't say as I blame her
Many seniors do fine in urban areas. You talk about being house bound because of bad weather well guess you can become house bound in FL as well when you become a menace on the roads and should not be driving anymore.
There are plenty of MIDDLE CLASS doing just fine in NY. Not every one has to be hoity toity wealthy snobs who wouldn't dream of using the subways to reside there..sheesh
Many NYer's do NOT own a car, when they want to get out of town they rent a zip car.

Also don't recall seeing anyone suggesting the Upper East Side to o/p...we know the hoity toity peeps live there
OK - if New York City is so great for seniors - why do you live in New Jersey (and not New York City)? (Note that I don't know whether or not you're a senior.)

Is New York City on your list of possible retirement places? And - if not - why not (you wouldn't have to move far)? And - conversely - why is/was St. Augustine (my neck of the woods) on your list of possible retirement places?

Is there any senior here who lives in New York City (I know mathjak lives in Queens - but don't think he's a senior yet - > 65). Has any senior here actually moved to New York City to retire (or even known someone who did)? Robyn
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Old 06-20-2014, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,846,832 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
OK - if New York City is so great for seniors - why do you live in New Jersey (and not New York City)? (Note that I don't know whether or not you're a senior.)

Is New York City on your list of possible retirement places? And - if not - why not (you wouldn't have to move far)? And - conversely - why is/was St. Augustine (my neck of the woods) on your list of possible retirement places?

Is there any senior here who lives in New York City (I know mathjak lives in Queens - but don't think he's a senior yet - > 65). Has any senior here actually moved to New York City to retire (or even known someone who did)? Robyn

Don't be so defensive Robyn. Most of us agree with you on NYC is not an ideal location to retire to. There are good points and bad in any location and we as individuals need to address them in our own lives. There are so many factors that need to be considered and since we do not know if OP needs a walker or not we do not know if there is anything physically limitting either.

You made some great points and no one should dispute them. Winters in NYC can be as harsh as they are in my neck of the woods and we know how to deal with it. Case in point Christmas 2010 a blizard rocked NYC and the airports and basically the city was shut down for a week. I know I was flying out of there on my way to Ft Lauderdale (long story) for a cruise.

Op if they are still following needs to consider the cost of a place in NYC. They also need to consider the weather in good and bad times as well as what they are looking for in terms of things they can do and want to do.

The same goes for Boston, Philly, Baltimore, DC/Alexandria, Dover. All are walkable cities and could be areas to consider. The cost of the initial move needs to be taken into consideration as well as on going costs. Also as I have said, items like family, and support from services that will need to be re-established because of the move.

No one should make a move without considering the consequences and without testing the water first.
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Old 06-20-2014, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
O/P just to give you an idea, plenty of studios here on the upper west side under $2K

Citi-Habitats New York City Apartments - NYC Apartments - Manhattan Lofts, Real Estate Rental
You didn't search (your first listing was a place for over $50K a month!).

A search of Upper West Side with an elevator and a doorman and a laundry room somewhere in the building comes up with about a dozen listings. Most are really north or really west or both. Not areas where I would walk around at night. This is about as good as it gets - 350 sf in a decent area near the park for $2k/month:

225 Central Park West #314 Studio in Central Park West Rental 402968

Same search on the upper east side (better/safer side of Manhattan in general IMO) brings up only 2 listings. This is one (in Yorkville):

Studio in Upper East Side Rental ID#235153

Robyn
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Old 06-20-2014, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,886,776 times
Reputation: 11146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
OK - if New York City is so great for seniors - why do you live in New Jersey (and not New York City)? (Note that I don't know whether or not you're a senior.)

Is New York City on your list of possible retirement places? And - if not - why not (you wouldn't have to move far)? And - conversely - why is/was St. Augustine (my neck of the woods) on your list of possible retirement places?

Is there any senior here who lives in New York City (I know mathjak lives in Queens - but don't think he's a senior yet - > 65). Has any senior here actually moved to New York City to retire (or even known someone who did)? Robyn
Because hubbie is one of those fools that think FL is utopia....slowly weaning him away from that concept.

I would live in NYC in a heartbeat, hubbie won't. He doesn't care for urban areas but I'm still close enough to go in quite often and out to Bklyn to see son & DIL

The thing is O/P was ASKING about retiring to NYC, a novel idea to many I know.
She wasn't asking about retiring to FL, she lives there already.

Thirdly where I retire or investigate to retire is really none of your business
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Old 06-20-2014, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,886,776 times
Reputation: 11146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
You didn't search (your first listing was a place for over $50K a month!).

A search of Upper West Side with an elevator and a doorman and a laundry room somewhere in the building comes up with about a dozen listings. Most are really north or really west or both. Not areas where I would walk around at night. This is about as good as it gets - 350 sf in a decent area near the park for $2k/month:

225 Central Park West #314 Studio in Central Park West Rental 402968

Same search on the upper east side (better/safer side of Manhattan in general IMO) brings up only 2 listings. This is one (in Yorkville):

Studio in Upper East Side Rental ID#235153

Robyn
You need to go through the list in ascending/desending order and I had confidence o/p was smart enough to figure that out.
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