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Old 06-20-2014, 07:35 PM
 
2,772 posts, read 3,585,348 times
Reputation: 1379

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
No borough other than Staten Island is > 50% white/non-Hispanic. In all boroughs - a substantial % of households and sometimes a majority speak a language other than English at home. All boroughs have large/very large percentages of people born outside the US. IOW - it's kind of like Miami - without palm trees <LOL>. And most people - even those in Florida - wouldn't think of living in Miami in a million years - because it's too "foreign". Don't know if the OP and others had taken the demographics of the city into account - but they're worth a look IMO. Robyn
It's very true - New York is not majority white, and about 37% of people are immigrants (most speak English, but not all). Some people continue to consider a neighborhood without enough white faces to be really scary, even if it's quite safe, and it's sad.

People in wheelchairs do take public transit, but they have to be aware which stations are accessible - by me the Metro North is but the subway is not-- and all buses are accessible. Little by little more of the system becomes accessible as they add elevators to stations -- but it's a long-term process. I don't think it's "easy" to be disabled anywhere--absolutely not. But some people can hold onto their independence a little longer if they don't need to drive - it depends on the situation.
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Old 06-20-2014, 09:04 PM
 
10,812 posts, read 8,056,502 times
Reputation: 17010
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
It's very true - New York is not majority white, and about 37% of people are immigrants (most speak English, but not all).
NYC is far from unique in that regard. Dallas and Houston have similar demographics and I assume many other large cities do as well.

I'm comfortable in that environment (I taught English as a Second Language for several years) but anyone who's not probably doesn't need to be considering ANY large cities as retirement home.
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Old 06-21-2014, 01:22 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas (Winchester)
412 posts, read 307,086 times
Reputation: 417
When I lived in NYC, a woman obviously in her sixties, single, bought a coop in my building and had it renovated. It was also her plan to retire to NYC. I'm not sure where she was from but it was not NYC.

IMHO $60K gross leaves you with a maximum of less than $4K/month after taxes. So it would seem possible to move to Manhattan if you can get a cheap apartment. However, it is REALLY difficult to get into an apartment in Manhattan. You would be competing against full-time employees making six figure salaries.

Also, you might want to consider how much health insurance would cost if you aren't on Medicare.

I could pretty easily pull $60K annually from my savings in dividends, but I would never consider NYC affordable since I have to buy health insurance. I don't even put it in the realm of consideration.

Have you considered Portland or Chicago? Neither is NYC, but both have pretty good public transport and are walkable. You might also want to look into Pittsburgh for urban living at relative affordability.
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Old 06-21-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,900 posts, read 1,582,286 times
Reputation: 7913
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchmiller9 View Post

IMHO $60K gross leaves you with a maximum of less than $4K/month after taxes. So it would seem possible to move to Manhattan if you can get a cheap apartment. However, it is REALLY difficult to get into an apartment in Manhattan. You would be competing against full-time employees making six figure salaries.....

I could pretty easily pull $60K annually from my savings in dividends, but I would never consider NYC affordable .....
That's why I suggested to the OP to check out housing just over the water & near mass transit. Apartments in my building are going for a bit more than $300k for a 1 bdrm & it's a nice area, 15 minutes to Grand Central by subway. My coop (HOA + taxes) fees are $ 630/mo. Well meaning suggestions by others for neighboring suburbs or upstate NY I think miss the OP's desire to be in the city, not to be able to commute to it, one will just not bother then & be stranded in a suburb sfh & alone, I agree that Portland or Philadelphia or some university towns would be a better choice than that.

What I think is doable in this regard is as far as: north-Riverdale, east-Jackson Heights, west-Jersey City. There are nice areas further south like Bay Ridge but that may be too far for a Manhattan lover, maybe not. Yes if you want to spend your days surrounded by only white people that speak english this isn't for you. One doesn't have to be rich to live like this, but one does have to put in more effort & time for the learning curve in this idiosyncratic market, finding my place was like taking on another job, but it paid off.
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Old 06-21-2014, 08:04 AM
 
3 posts, read 3,015 times
Reputation: 46
NYC native here, lifetime resident of 58 years, but when my husband retired in 2010 we moved (to Austin TX). There was no way we could have afforded to continue to live in our condo on the UES on my low 6 figure salary alone and DH's SS. I guess we could have depleted DH's 401K faster, but why? OP didn't mention what her income or budget is, so it's hard to really say anything that would apply since no details were given. If the pension is $2-3k a month and SS about $2k, that's nowhere near enough unless you have a hefty dividend portfolio as well IMHO. So below is idle speculation on my part since not enough detail was provided by the OP about income, lifestyle consideration, interests, etc. Feel free to ignore this long post.

All this talk about middle-income seniors living easily in Manhattan - they aren't paying high rents in newly rented apartments, rather, they are in apartments they've been in for years where their rents are not the astronomical ones being charged today. We sold our condo early, before we were ready to leave NY so we rented a 1 BR apartment in our building - for $3600/ month. Yikes.

The pros: it's great and I miss the liveliness, the ability to walk everywhere in my neighborhood, the vibrancy, the possibility, and some friends with mutual interests. Another pro is if you are over a certain age you can take college courses for very little money as a senior and be intellectually stimulated and meet other people your age that way. They don't offer that at the University of Texas btw. To meet people rather than just a passing acquaintance with neighbors you have to find some interest and join a group of like-minded people. Another pro - I think the medical care is excellent, not so in Austin, speaking as a medical professional.

The cons: you really need A LOT of money and you have to be mobile.
There are many awful and unacceptable apartments for under $2000 in Manhattan. Don't believe what you read online or in an ad, apartment hunt for yourself to see some of the really bad places that will be pawned off on you. There are gems among the coal but it takes a lot of digging. And there is a lot of competition.

I have lived all over Manhattan, worked in the Bronx (from whence I came) and in several parts of Brooklyn. The trendy parts of Brooklyn are as expensive as Manhattan and easier to get to Manhattan than the further out neighborhoods which often require bus plus subway trips. The further out you live the less often you will want to come into Manhattan.

NYC is expensive. Food shopping is more expensive. Without a car you can't carry a lot of grocery bags home so you have them delivered - add the tacked-on $3+ delivery charge and tipping the delivery person and you've paid more than you would have in gas to drive to a supermarket. Unless you like going grocery shopping several times a week. Not my thing, but it may be yours.

Eating out - one of the joys of life in NYC, but it adds up fast if you are doing it many times a week even on the cheap.

Though there are many free or low-cost things to do there's also numerous expensive things. And if you are going out at night a lot, you might not want to take the subway alone at 10:30 - 11 pm, so that means a taxi. The expenses add up.

So if you are not going out at night much, do you really want to be cooped up in a 350 sq ft studio listening to music or watching tv? And you will want a decent kitchen space to cook if you are saving money by not eating out all the time. That kind of space comes with the increased price of rent.

The weather: I was blessed to be able to walk to my office (10 blocks) 3 days a week and commute the other 2 days to the clinic in the Bronx (subway) or when I worked in Brooklyn, often by car. In cold and/or rainy or snowy weather the number of cancellations of my patients was astronomical, even if they lived in the neighborhood. While in my 50's I could walk - rain or snow or 100 degree weather - but most of my older patients could not get crosstown. The past few years there have been a significant number of days in the winter with various storms; most will be house- bound. Thus you need to shop ahead for groceries, etc.

I would not suggest living in a town with a river crossing. Jersey City? Not really. Hoboken - also expensive. Poughkeepsie as someone mentioned - way too far away, you would need a car to live there, it's colder and quite a bit snowier than NYC and the train ride is over an hour, then there's bus and subway rides on top of that. Long Island and parts of Queens - ditto.

I think if one is going to move to NY to retire, one would want to do it in Manhattan below 110th St on the West Side (still sketchy areas there) and below 96th St on the East Side, midtown east or west or downtown. Parts of Brooklyn are also a possibility although personally I didn't want to live there. Personal preference.

So I don't want to be a Debby-downer but this is the opinion of one who decided to not stay in the city despite a healthy retirement portfolio but no pension. To me, it really does boil down to money, having enough for a projected longevity, so the more, the better.

Good luck, whatever you do.
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Old 06-21-2014, 08:13 AM
 
3 posts, read 3,015 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
You need to go through the list in ascending/desending order and I had confidence o/p was smart enough to figure that out.
That UES apartment (90th St between 2nd and 1st) is actually quite a long hike to the subway (86th or 96th St), some of those buildings are ok and some are old, not great, tenements which have been cosmetically updated.

I lived on 92nd between 1st and 2nd in 1975 and paid $175 a month for the same type of studio. Haha.
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Old 06-21-2014, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,850 posts, read 7,795,643 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
NYC is far from unique in that regard. Dallas and Houston have similar demographics and I assume many other large cities do as well.

I'm comfortable in that environment (I taught English as a Second Language for several years) but anyone who's not probably doesn't need to be considering ANY large cities as retirement home.
I lived in Houston for 26 years before moving to Philly in 2011 upon retirement. I can attest to Houston's rich diversity. Outside of NYC and LA, it is probably the most diverse city in the US. I've seen a couple of posts that seem to obliquely insinuate that the "demographics" and/or "foreign" nature of this place or that place render them unsuitable to live in. Well, I'll be quite plain about it - like you, we are more than comfortable with people of different backgrounds and skin colors. After living and working all those years in Houston, we would have never considered relocating to anyplace that is exclusively or overwhelmingly white. I agree that anyone considering living in NYC must be similarly comfortable in a diverse world. To me, the richness of diversity is one of the best aspects of NYC rather than something to be feared. As the old song goes, however: "One Man's Ceiling is Another Man's Floor."
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
...Yes if you want to spend your days surrounded by only white people that speak english this isn't for you..
What a novel thought. Living in the US surrounded by people who don't speak English (or - at least in places like Miami - don't even try) . Robyn
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,920,408 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iac1003 View Post
NYC native here, lifetime resident of 58 years, but when my husband retired in 2010 we moved (to Austin TX). There was no way we could have afforded to continue to live in our condo on the UES on my low 6 figure salary alone and DH's SS. I guess we could have depleted DH's 401K faster, but why? OP didn't mention what her income or budget is, so it's hard to really say anything that would apply since no details were given. If the pension is $2-3k a month and SS about $2k, that's nowhere near enough unless you have a hefty dividend portfolio as well IMHO. So below is idle speculation on my part since not enough detail was provided by the OP about income, lifestyle consideration, interests, etc. Feel free to ignore this long post.

All this talk about middle-income seniors living easily in Manhattan - they aren't paying high rents in newly rented apartments, rather, they are in apartments they've been in for years where their rents are not the astronomical ones being charged today. We sold our condo early, before we were ready to leave NY so we rented a 1 BR apartment in our building - for $3600/ month. Yikes.

The pros: it's great and I miss the liveliness, the ability to walk everywhere in my neighborhood, the vibrancy, the possibility, and some friends with mutual interests. Another pro is if you are over a certain age you can take college courses for very little money as a senior and be intellectually stimulated and meet other people your age that way. They don't offer that at the University of Texas btw. To meet people rather than just a passing acquaintance with neighbors you have to find some interest and join a group of like-minded people. Another pro - I think the medical care is excellent, not so in Austin, speaking as a medical professional.

The cons: you really need A LOT of money and you have to be mobile.
There are many awful and unacceptable apartments for under $2000 in Manhattan. Don't believe what you read online or in an ad, apartment hunt for yourself to see some of the really bad places that will be pawned off on you. There are gems among the coal but it takes a lot of digging. And there is a lot of competition.

I have lived all over Manhattan, worked in the Bronx (from whence I came) and in several parts of Brooklyn. The trendy parts of Brooklyn are as expensive as Manhattan and easier to get to Manhattan than the further out neighborhoods which often require bus plus subway trips. The further out you live the less often you will want to come into Manhattan.

NYC is expensive. Food shopping is more expensive. Without a car you can't carry a lot of grocery bags home so you have them delivered - add the tacked-on $3+ delivery charge and tipping the delivery person and you've paid more than you would have in gas to drive to a supermarket. Unless you like going grocery shopping several times a week. Not my thing, but it may be yours.

Eating out - one of the joys of life in NYC, but it adds up fast if you are doing it many times a week even on the cheap.

Though there are many free or low-cost things to do there's also numerous expensive things. And if you are going out at night a lot, you might not want to take the subway alone at 10:30 - 11 pm, so that means a taxi. The expenses add up.

So if you are not going out at night much, do you really want to be cooped up in a 350 sq ft studio listening to music or watching tv? And you will want a decent kitchen space to cook if you are saving money by not eating out all the time. That kind of space comes with the increased price of rent.

The weather: I was blessed to be able to walk to my office (10 blocks) 3 days a week and commute the other 2 days to the clinic in the Bronx (subway) or when I worked in Brooklyn, often by car. In cold and/or rainy or snowy weather the number of cancellations of my patients was astronomical, even if they lived in the neighborhood. While in my 50's I could walk - rain or snow or 100 degree weather - but most of my older patients could not get crosstown. The past few years there have been a significant number of days in the winter with various storms; most will be house- bound. Thus you need to shop ahead for groceries, etc.

I would not suggest living in a town with a river crossing. Jersey City? Not really. Hoboken - also expensive. Poughkeepsie as someone mentioned - way too far away, you would need a car to live there, it's colder and quite a bit snowier than NYC and the train ride is over an hour, then there's bus and subway rides on top of that. Long Island and parts of Queens - ditto.

I think if one is going to move to NY to retire, one would want to do it in Manhattan below 110th St on the West Side (still sketchy areas there) and below 96th St on the East Side, midtown east or west or downtown. Parts of Brooklyn are also a possibility although personally I didn't want to live there. Personal preference.

So I don't want to be a Debby-downer but this is the opinion of one who decided to not stay in the city despite a healthy retirement portfolio but no pension. To me, it really does boil down to money, having enough for a projected longevity, so the more, the better.

Good luck, whatever you do.
Very good informative message IMO. FWIW - here in Florida - if you're a senior - you can take many state college/university courses for free. OTOH - many are above the heads of many seniors. But we have OLLI courses too - better suited for most seniors - they're very inexpensive.

Guess medical care varies a lot from area to area. Ours here in the JAX metro area is excellent (especially when it comes to the Mayo Clinic).

You're 100% right about older people who've lived in Manhattan for a long time getting much better deals than people who might move there now. Because they're living in rent-controlled apartments - or bought condos/coops 30+ years ago.

I've looked into the concept of having a pied a terre in a place like Manhattan and the dollars didn't make a whole lot of (if any) sense, Robyn
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:38 PM
 
71,471 posts, read 71,652,652 times
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Manhattan is very costly . We like living in an area in queens which is only 17 minutes from manattan but much more affordable.

Still costly as far as areas outside the tristate area but not to bad in comparison.
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