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Old 06-21-2014, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,775,806 times
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Since I am not familiar with any details about New York City, such as current rental prices in the various areas and neighborhoods, I have not been able to help the OP with same.

But it just does my heart good to note the positive reactions of some posters to the OP's desire to take the road less traveled and move TO New York City rather than escape from it.

This is not a criticism of the vast majority of retirees who, for financial reasons, are not able to consider living in such a place.

Not only is housing expensive there, but the main reasons why I could conceivably want to live there (opera, symphony, museums and the like, and not just any opera, symphony, and museums, but world class ones) are also very pricey.

Perhaps the reason a desire to live in NYC resonates with me even though I do not share it because I am content where I am, is that what NYC has to offer is basically what Los Angeles has to offer, the main differences being that our weather is a tad better and our public transportation is a tad worse.
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Old 06-21-2014, 06:43 PM
 
2,776 posts, read 3,596,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
I lived in Houston for 26 years before moving to Philly in 2011 upon retirement. I can attest to Houston's rich diversity. Outside of NYC and LA, it is probably the most diverse city in the US. I've seen a couple of posts that seem to obliquely insinuate that the "demographics" and/or "foreign" nature of this place or that place render them unsuitable to live in. Well, I'll be quite plain about it - like you, we are more than comfortable with people of different backgrounds and skin colors. After living and working all those years in Houston, we would have never considered relocating to anyplace that is exclusively or overwhelmingly white. I agree that anyone considering living in NYC must be similarly comfortable in a diverse world. To me, the richness of diversity is one of the best aspects of NYC rather than something to be feared. As the old song goes, however: "One Man's Ceiling is Another Man's Floor."
Everybody's different and for me the diversity is also a plus rather than a minus. I started a part time job recently where I get the chance to meet people from all over the world. I'm the only American who works there at this time because of a language requirement that Americans are less likely to fulfill). I find it incredibly interesting and couldn't imagine living anywhere else in the US. I live in a neighborhood with a lot of Spanish speaking people and have friends and acquaintances that I speak to in Spanish. To me, it's enriching rather than bothersome.

How expensive it is also depends on where you choose to live. It's just not that cut and dry.

Last edited by yodel; 06-21-2014 at 07:00 PM..
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Old 06-22-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,966,631 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
It's very true - New York is not majority white, and about 37% of people are immigrants (most speak English, but not all). Some people continue to consider a neighborhood without enough white faces to be really scary, even if it's quite safe, and it's sad...
Non-white - immigrant doesn't always = unsafe. But it gets old after a while when you live in a place where most people don't speak the language you speak. Note that I moved to where I live now after 20+ years in Miami - speak Spanish - but don't care to have to speak Spanish to communicate with everyone on a daily basis (except perhaps when I'm on vacation).

There's also the "friends" potential. If you're a 70 year old woman who only speaks English - doubt you'll become best buddies with the 70 year old woman down the hallway from you who only speaks Spanish.

Quote:
People in wheelchairs do take public transit, but they have to be aware which stations are accessible - by me the Metro North is but the subway is not-- and all buses are accessible. Little by little more of the system becomes accessible as they add elevators to stations -- but it's a long-term process. I don't think it's "easy" to be disabled anywhere--absolutely not. But some people can hold onto their independence a little longer if they don't need to drive - it depends on the situation.
Just comparing my father (here in Florida) and my aunt (in New York - Queens up until recently) - I'd say my father - who drives (many seniors do drive here until they're pretty old) was more independent than my aunt in Queens (who never even learned how to drive a car). At least if we're talking about ages 80-85+.

BTW - how old are you? I'm 66 and my father is 95 (my aunt is 92). In terms of people my father's and aunt's ages - I think it's tough/perhaps impossible being independent no matter where you live. Robyn
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Old 06-22-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,966,631 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Since I am not familiar with any details about New York City, such as current rental prices in the various areas and neighborhoods, I have not been able to help the OP with same.

But it just does my heart good to note the positive reactions of some posters to the OP's desire to take the road less traveled and move TO New York City rather than escape from it.

This is not a criticism of the vast majority of retirees who, for financial reasons, are not able to consider living in such a place.

Not only is housing expensive there, but the main reasons why I could conceivably want to live there (opera, symphony, museums and the like, and not just any opera, symphony, and museums, but world class ones) are also very pricey.

Perhaps the reason a desire to live in NYC resonates with me even though I do not share it because I am content where I am, is that what NYC has to offer is basically what Los Angeles has to offer, the main differences being that our weather is a tad better and our public transportation is a tad worse.
The people who react positively aren't people who live in Manhattan (where most of the cultural attractions are). I put out an invite for any people who live in Manhattan these days - and none has responded to date. It's nose bleed territory when it comes to the price of housing. Also - as you noted - when it comes to a lot of the cultural attractions - including restaurants - they're pricey too. There are things that are fun/interesting in Manhattan. But moving there just to avoid something like owning a car isn't one of them. One could live in various places in many parts of the country in nice places for cheap - take cabs 100% of the time - and still spend a lot less than one would have to spend on a dump in Manhattan and use the subway.

Guess what individual people are looking for will vary. But I doubt it would be any middle income senior's dream to live in a teeny tiny apartment in an area where one couldn't do afford to do much of anything except ride the (rather IMO) deceipit subway system. Robyn
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Old 06-22-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,775,806 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
The people who react positively aren't people who live in Manhattan (where most of the cultural attractions are). I put out an invite for any people who live in Manhattan these days - and none has responded to date. It's nose bleed territory when it comes to the price of housing. Also - as you noted - when it comes to a lot of the cultural attractions - including restaurants - they're pricey too. There are things that are fun/interesting in Manhattan. But moving there just to avoid something like owning a car isn't one of them. One could live in various places in many parts of the country in nice places for cheap - take cabs 100% of the time - and still spend a lot less than one would have to spend on a dump in Manhattan and use the subway.

Guess what individual people are looking for will vary. But I doubt it would be any middle income senior's dream to live in a teeny tiny apartment in an area where one couldn't do afford to do much of anything except ride the (rather IMO) deceipit subway system. Robyn
Well, for example Mathjak posted that he lives in Queens, saying it is less expensive than Manhattan but that Manhattan is accessible from there. Are you saying that places like Queens are outside the city limits of New York City? If so, I need to bring more precision to my posts here.

Like you, I don't especially care for cramped quarters, so I am not personally looking to check out NYC. I just thought (and I still do) that it was refreshing to note someone interested in going there (for the reasons I stated so I won't repeat them).
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Old 06-22-2014, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,382 posts, read 3,724,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmenesq View Post
I am still several years away from retirement, but lately I have been playing with the idea of relocating to NYC from FL to retire. My thoughts are as follows: I am a single woman, native of FL and like the idea of mass transit that could get me all over the city and have access to transportation to other areas, such as Boston, etc. -- all without the need of driving a car. I also like the idea of no longer owning a SFH so when something breaks I can call the super/landlord instead of worrying about it myself. I don't have any close relatives in NYC though I do have a couple of cousins who live there and a couple of others who live in Connecticut. I Have an adult daughter who currently lives in FL but who knows what she will be doing in a few years. I realize that the winters are cold in NYC, but I have been thinking that since I would be retired I would have the option of staying inside on the coldest days.

I am not wealthy but I would have a reasonable pension in addition to SS to cover living expenses, etc. I would be willing to downsize to even a studio apartment since I do not need much space. In addition, I am thinking that the increased housing expense might be offset by the money I would be saving on car insurance, car payments, car insurance and even homeowners insurance.

I have not been to NYC for about 30 years so I realize that I would need to visit and give it a try before doing anything permanent and I also realize that I could live there for a couple of years and relocate again if I decided to do so.

I am wondering if anyone here as any thoughts that they would like to share with me concerning this idea. I searched but did not find any posts on this specific topic. Am I crazy for even considering this idea?
No reason not if you can afford it. I think you should rent a place for a couple of months to test the idea out since you have been gone for 30 years. I know I would not like it and I think my budget would be very unhappy.
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Old 06-22-2014, 04:25 PM
 
Location: NYC
1,723 posts, read 3,383,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Well, for example Mathjak posted that he lives in Queens, saying it is less expensive than Manhattan but that Manhattan is accessible from there. Are you saying that places like Queens are outside the city limits of New York City? If so, I need to bring more precision to my posts here.

Like you, I don't especially care for cramped quarters, so I am not personally looking to check out NYC. I just thought (and I still do) that it was refreshing to note someone interested in going there (for the reasons I stated so I won't repeat them).
NYC is made up of 5 boroughs. Manhattan, which most outsiders refer to as NYC, then there's Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx and Staten Island.

I think a lot of the confusion stemming from the OP's post is that she said NYC.. So does she mean all the borough's? Or just Manhattan?

Manhattan apartment prices in decent, not upper class neighborhoods are sky high as is everything in Manhattan and all the boroughs of NYC.
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Old 06-22-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,255,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauriedeee View Post
NYC is made up of 5 boroughs. Manhattan, which most outsiders refer to as NYC, then there's Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx and Staten Island.
What borough is Little Italy in? I have a friend who lives there, and he keeps bugging me about coming to visit during a big food fair. Feast of San (something)?
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Old 06-22-2014, 04:42 PM
 
Location: NYC
1,723 posts, read 3,383,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
What borough is Little Italy in? I have a friend who lives there, and he keeps bugging me about coming to visit during a big food fair. Feast of San (something)?
Feast of San Gennaro...It's in lower Manhattan. hey, If you love food, fun, music, people and food.. did I mention the incredible food choices? You've got to go at least once.
It's an experience not to be missed.

Use Google images and search this..... san gennaro festival nyc

Last edited by Lauriedeee; 06-22-2014 at 05:06 PM.. Reason: to add something
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Old 06-23-2014, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,920 posts, read 4,665,336 times
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There are lots of great areas in NYC (all 5 boros) in which the OP could live affordably. The Kew Gardens/Forest Hills/Rego Park are in Queens is great and still affordable. Woodside/Sunyside in Queens is busier but it's also closer to NYC and cheaper than KG/FH/RP. All those areas are right on the subway lines. Even Bayside isn't bad. There are other areas of Queens which are not convenient to subway but do have ample bus lines. Areas like Middle Village, Maspeth and Ridgewood.

Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn is a great location and slightly cheaper than Park Slope/Brooklyn Heights/Cobble Hill which are all very close by. CG is close to subway. Other relatively affordable areas in Brooklyn include Ditmas Park, Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bay Ridge.

If the OP can afford it, living directly in Manhattan is a "win" because you'll be close to just about everything you could possibly want. My husband and I are hoping we'll be able to afford to retire in Manhattan when the time comes (yes, we plan to move back to NYC when we retire). We're hoping UES will still be somewhat affordable, but failing that we'd be perfectly content in one of the Villages or even LES. If we can be in Manhattan though, we'll go back to Kew Gardens where we lived for 4-5 years when we first got married. We LOVED LOVED LOVED Kew Gardens.
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