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Old 06-20-2014, 09:38 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,999,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
Thank you for verbalizing what I think with so many posts I read here.
Denial does run strong in this group.
I think perhaps many Boomers here like me have seen near end of life and others die in 20's.So I never believed any stage had a guarantee of living any determined time. Denial of what; that everyone is going to die at some point rather tomorrow or at later time no matter what age?
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Old 06-20-2014, 09:48 PM
 
3,948 posts, read 3,268,218 times
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Here again the thread is prompting those who see retirement as an extension of their working life. In my case I knew I was going to be a very different person in retirement just for the reason that I already knew that working had changed me from a once happy go lucky kid to the responsible person that most work demands. I want to be clear about this idea of worker responsibility and it's opposite, the slacker life, both have their place and time in our lives and that is the lesson not always learned by some. Who needs "challenges", or "structure", or "direction", or purpose for that matter, just live for today and be happy that you lived long enough to be in this exclusive club, the graveyard is full of those who almost made it.

For those who have gotten old but haven't reached the point in life that they have enough money to stop work, I feel sorry that they didn't do so when the opportunity arose, but, on average most of the American populace lives for the now way before they are ready to hang it up. For those who've made it to the finish line with money in the pocket I say this, on your first retirement day it is crucial to know your life course is going to change, and the great thing is you can now live your own philosophy according to what makes sense to you, doing whatever makes you happy and content--- now I've got to get out to that beach........

.
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Old 06-20-2014, 10:16 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,676,474 times
Reputation: 8726
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I think perhaps many Boomers here like me have seen near end of life and others die in 20's.So I never believed any stage had a guarantee of living any determined time. Denial of what; that everyone is going to die at some point rather tomorrow or at later time no matter what age?
The denial that death is coming and that we are on the downward curve of the life cycle. It's not a negative, it's part of life.

This blog piece Your body wasn’t built to last: a lesson from human mortality rates | Gravity and Levity is an interesting read. The bottom line is our chance of dying doubles every eight years.

The Actuarial Life Table from Social Security echoes this fairly close.

Many posts here are of the 50 is the new 30 or 70 is the new 50 type; age defying sayings that only a boomer could come up with. Who else is 50 and 70? Rewriting history doesn't change it.

Last edited by jean_ji; 06-20-2014 at 10:59 PM..
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Old 06-21-2014, 01:44 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas (Winchester)
412 posts, read 308,221 times
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Jertheber:

Wow, what an inspirational post to read here on my last day of work. My retirement started around 7:00PM PDT June 20, 2014.

I see retirement as both an opportunity to relax, but also as an opportunity to pursue interests that I just didn't have time to when I was working. I find it hard to fathom that one would be bored in retirement.
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Old 06-21-2014, 02:10 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,301 posts, read 12,226,177 times
Reputation: 8054
Retirement was much simpler when I was young and would watch the old guys. In the morning they would get up and go to a cafe to meet with a friend or two, sip coffee, and solve the world's problems. In the afternoons they would drink beer and play golf or pool, or maybe mow the lawn and putter around the garage and yard. In the evenings they would meet up with friends, smoke cigars, and sip whiskey while playing poker. I think maybe the rich ones would dress up and go to nightclubs occasionally, but don't know for sure.
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,855,118 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
It isn't just about transition to but also from. Perhaps it depends on age and the resources along with the area you retire. If you are doing a voluntary early retirement complete with resources why is there any issue? It is your choice and u probably have a lifestyle change and the ability to provide it. Go to the ER forum and you will notice a different mindset between there and here. Doesn't a good early retirement plan have a vision and a goal with a historical plan of how and where to get there? Once achieved how many of us/them are looking back and not forward? Do many people really plan for and achieve a financially successful early retirement and look back?

I agree Tuborg. You have it about right. It is a transition. It is something that is made usually voluntarily but not always. As one said not everyone has a 30 career either. It is a rarity that someone works for that long at one place.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
Here again the thread is prompting those who see retirement as an extension of their working life. In my case I knew I was going to be a very different person in retirement just for the reason that I already knew that working had changed me from a once happy go lucky kid to the responsible person that most work demands. I want to be clear about this idea of worker responsibility and it's opposite, the slacker life, both have their place and time in our lives and that is the lesson not always learned by some. Who needs "challenges", or "structure", or "direction", or purpose for that matter, just live for today and be happy that you lived long enough to be in this exclusive club, the graveyard is full of those who almost made it.

For those who have gotten old but haven't reached the point in life that they have enough money to stop work, I feel sorry that they didn't do so when the opportunity arose, but, on average most of the American populace lives for the now way before they are ready to hang it up. For those who've made it to the finish line with money in the pocket I say this, on your first retirement day it is crucial to know your life course is going to change, and the great thing is you can now live your own philosophy according to what makes sense to you, doing whatever makes you happy and content--- now I've got to get out to that beach........

.

I hope more people take your last paragraph and run with it. You said it wisely and it is very important that instead of just sitting about waiting for the grass to grow get out and enjoy it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchmiller9 View Post
Jertheber:

Wow, what an inspirational post to read here on my last day of work. My retirement started around 7:00PM PDT June 20, 2014.

I see retirement as both an opportunity to relax, but also as an opportunity to pursue interests that I just didn't have time to when I was working. I find it hard to fathom that one would be bored in retirement.
Congrats and please keep coming back letting us know how you are doing. We want the details too. If you feel that you need more inspiration just ask. We are only too happy to oblige. Just don't ask Curmudgeon. He might tell you to stand in one spot and become an asparagus sprout.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
Retirement was much simpler when I was young and would watch the old guys. In the morning they would get up and go to a cafe to meet with a friend or two, sip coffee, and solve the world's problems. In the afternoons they would drink beer and play golf or pool, or maybe mow the lawn and putter around the garage and yard. In the evenings they would meet up with friends, smoke cigars, and sip whiskey while playing poker. I think maybe the rich ones would dress up and go to nightclubs occasionally, but don't know for sure.
Retirement was never simple. Even for those old guys you spoke of. They had to go through the same transition. What makes it hard and this goes for anyone, is that it is a transition. It don't matter how many different jobs you had. You had an identity and now that has changed. A 30 year career at multiple places or at a single place is still a career. Most of us have worked for 40 or more, a long time in any book. The day you transition from work to retirement is a relief and a fear. The fear of an unknown unless you planned it. Your plan don't have to be what happens but what does happen will result from your plan.

I want to leave this line out there for you. Failing to plan IS planning to fail.
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,994,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
Thank you for verbalizing what I think with so many posts I read here.
Denial does run strong in this group.
It is what it is, the final leg (timewise). What's to deny about that? We can be depressed or upbeat, that is the choice we all have. We can lie on a beach most days or help out in a classroom. We can mix it up and do a little of both. Hopefully we can nurture our health at whatever level it happens to be, maximizing it as much as possible. If we look at a calendar, it's the "last third," even if we live till 100.
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Vermont
1,018 posts, read 1,423,007 times
Reputation: 1995
Our company had a 3 month voluntary lack of work years ago. It was a great test drive for retirement for many. I enjoyed every minute of it, was never bored once, and rarely had the TV on. I developed a routine of fun stuff and kept busy every day. My neighbor and I walked every morning, started with 2 miles and ended up doing 7 a day, and I noticed a big difference in how I felt. I got projects done around the house and neighborhood, started practicing my guitar more, took motorcycle rides, and kept the wife happy, cooking, cleaning and getting errands done. I finally had the time to "take my time" on things and not try and hurry through to get to the next thing.
Retirement is the time to break out of the box that work has put you in timewise. Create new goals for yourself mentally and physically. Learn an instrument, jump out of a plane, get in shape, volunteer, start a business. Some people can't imagine doing anything but what they've always done. Travel the same roads and you'll only see the same things. We're still working, but have started now. We pick vacations to places we've never been, road trips on routes we've never been on, and think outside the box for everything. Life has become more interesting and fun. It's easy to get in and stay in a rut. We climbed out and will never go back.
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,802 posts, read 4,851,439 times
Reputation: 19509
Maybe because I'm a woman I don't get this, but my DH sure is happier since he retired so what this article describes clearly is not a universal experience. I guess we are in the 40% who are truly happy retired. We had a vision of retiring, finally having time to work on our house, selling it, moving to our dream location, and having all the time in the world to pursue our favorite recreational activities and travel. We are finally there and loving our lives. We each have hobbies and are very much self-entertainers. We don't require constant challenges to be happy, although it sometimes seems life keeps throwing them at us!?!. We also know that only boring people get bored. If you are bored, get up and do something. If you have no hobbies, maybe it's just because you didn't have the time to pursue them. Now that you do, get out there and try them to see if you like it. It doesn't have to be expensive. It could be learning to fish, or cook, painting, photography, working on small motors, woodworking, learning a new musical instrument, gardening, cake decorating, hiking, or bird watching, you name it. If you don't like to do it alone then join a club to find a buddy. If you don't like the club, quit it. You decide. Most colleges have a program for seniors to be able to audit classes. All the joy of new knowledge without the bother of being graded or judged. Right now we can't travel because we have two elderly dogs that need us here, so we are putting that off for a year or two and eagerly anticipating it. I can't see a day when I will be totally bored, because the power to fix that is within my own hands. I view the day I retired like a woman who just got out of prison, life was a little sweeter, colors were brighter, the chains were removed and I walked away a free woman at last, hallelujah!!
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Old 06-21-2014, 05:51 AM
 
29,809 posts, read 34,894,042 times
Reputation: 11730
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
It is what it is, the final leg (timewise). What's to deny about that? We can be depressed or upbeat, that is the choice we all have. We can lie on a beach most days or help out in a classroom. We can mix it up and do a little of both. Hopefully we can nurture our health at whatever level it happens to be, maximizing it as much as possible. If we look at a calendar, it's the "last third," even if we live till 100.
It is what it is and for many it is still about life and retirement becomes the opportunity to enjoy it more frequently and to hopefully up the level and percentage of good times. I didn't think this thread was about aging but rather about freedom from work and did/could money enhance the happiness of that freedom. Obviously that answer varies with the individual. For me and I can only speak for me but being focused on the pursuit of happiness is not denial of aging but a focus on the opportunities in the here and now. We are in NOVA now visiting the youngest and grand and after returning for a few off to the beach for a couple and than back up,here for the 4th with the other son joining all of us in NOVA. May visit some old friends next trip but we have the time and resources to go when we want. Yes we got a new car to facilitate all the traveling and are blessed to have the resources to do what we want. The wife is talking more and more about moving permanently to another larger place at the beach and that may happen in a few. Perhaps at age seventy. Why age 70? My SS benefit will give us more to work with and if moving makes us happier and everything else including health is still a go than we may do it. So I know a lot of people who have retired recently and years ago who found they had enough money to retire happy for ever after ore the thread title. Probably the key thing was their ability to swim happily at the level of water they could afford. I think we all agree on that being the Key. Not how deep,or shallow someone else's pool is but what about yours. Some of us need more water to be happy others don't. Perhaps retirement planning is about knowing how big a pool you need to personally be happy and building it to your size. What is great is building it to that size with the ability to expand if desired. Perhaps add a hot tub? So let's all be happy and merry in retirement focused on our God given right to the pursuit of happiness. So pursue on my friend and all, others in this and other retirement forums.
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