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Old 08-01-2014, 08:19 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I'm sort of cooled on DA. Just too long between seasons. Same with Doc Martin. I don't know why those British can't get it together to keep one season after another going. LOL

Speaking of British...is anyone having a hard time getting Gillian's speech? Sounds like she has a mouthful of marbles. I'm missing a third of her words. Maybe I need a hearing aid....or is that unclear diction a dialect of some kind? Just wondering.
It's her Yorkshire dialect. The more educated people don't usually speak that way anymore but if you go out into the country or talk with older people, that's what you get. I have trouble understanding her and I really have no excuse because my grandparents came from Halifax!

There's a way of speaking and pronouncing and then there are words that are different from ours. If she puts a nappy on her baby and places him in a cot, that's a diaper and a crib. When they eat their dinner, that's tea, a buttie is a sandwich. The differences are endless and can really leave you hanging if you don't know the meaning.
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Old 08-01-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It's her Yorkshire dialect. The more educated people don't usually speak that way anymore but if you go out into the country or talk with older people, that's what you get. I have trouble understanding her and I really have no excuse because my grandparents came from Halifax!

There's a way of speaking and pronouncing and then there are words that are different from ours. If she puts a nappy on her baby and places him in a cot, that's a diaper and a crib. When they eat their dinner, that's tea, a buttie is a sandwich. The differences are endless and can really leave you hanging if you don't know the meaning.
Glad I'm not the only one, lol. And what's with all the tea the British drink? Good heavens, I thought we were bad with our coffee. It's tea morning, noon and night. Don't they ever drink a delicious cup of coffee??
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Old 08-01-2014, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It's her Yorkshire dialect. The more educated people don't usually speak that way anymore but if you go out into the country or talk with older people, that's what you get. I have trouble understanding her and I really have no excuse because my grandparents came from Halifax!

There's a way of speaking and pronouncing and then there are words that are different from ours. If she puts a nappy on her baby and places him in a cot, that's a diaper and a crib. When they eat their dinner, that's tea, a buttie is a sandwich. The differences are endless and can really leave you hanging if you don't know the meaning.

When I went to England we spent a few days on the Isle of Wight before heading to London. On the train a older woman sat across from me and talked to me the entire time. I was so embarrassed - I didn't understand a word she said. I thought it was my jet lag - I was a real mess for a few days - but I finally apologized and said I was having a hard time understanding which is why I wasn't responding. She was so offended - even when I said it was probably my jet lag and general lack of sleep.
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Old 08-01-2014, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
It's her dialect. That northern English accent is sometimes incomprehensible to us Yanks.

I find that putting on the closed captioning really helps. In fact, I never watch a British movie without putting on the subtitles. It makes such a difference to my understanding of what's going on.
But they invented the English language, lol! (No insult meant to the mother country, just...well, I think I'll turn on the closed captioning. I missed most of what she said about killing her ex, darn.)
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Old 08-02-2014, 08:08 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
When I went to England we spent a few days on the Isle of Wight before heading to London. On the train a older woman sat across from me and talked to me the entire time. I was so embarrassed - I didn't understand a word she said. I thought it was my jet lag - I was a real mess for a few days - but I finally apologized and said I was having a hard time understanding which is why I wasn't responding. She was so offended - even when I said it was probably my jet lag and general lack of sleep.
Besides having Yorkshire grandparents, I am now married (never too late) to a Brit from the North. When I went back with him he was able to have private conversations with his friends right in front of me! Whaaa?
It sounded like a foreign language.

Six years later I still have to translate for him at times--but it's not as bad as when he first came over.

We also have little fights because he'll tell me something, I'll think I understand, but I get it wrong and then he's mad at me. Oh, they drink coffee, not tea. Most of them drink coffee by the gallon, it seems. And my dh is always asking, "Where's my pot?" That refers to his tall, eternal cup of coffee that he keeps refilling so that it lasts all day. Yes, it can be hard to understand them unless they have a London accent or speak "received" pronunciation. You are well chuffed if you understand any of their dialect.
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Old 08-02-2014, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
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Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Besides having Yorkshire grandparents, I am now married (never too late) to a Brit from the North. When I went back with him he was able to have private conversations with his friends right in front of me! Whaaa?
It sounded like a foreign language.

Six years later I still have to translate for him at times--but it's not as bad as when he first came over.

We also have little fights because he'll tell me something, I'll think I understand, but I get it wrong and then he's mad at me. Oh, they drink coffee, not tea. Most of them drink coffee by the gallon, it seems. And my dh is always asking, "Where's my pot?" That refers to his tall, eternal cup of coffee that he keeps refilling so that it lasts all day. Yes, it can be hard to understand them unless they have a London accent or speak "received" pronunciation. You are well chuffed if you understand any of their dialect.
This makes me feel a little better - so they have trouble understanding us too. I didn't want to be one of these "ugly Americans" so I really tried to focus on what she was saying, it was English - right! - but I was lost.

But, I use to represent my company at National meetings and there was a guy from TN who was also a jabber box and when he talked, which was all the time, most people's eyes just glazed over. One time I looked at the guy leading the meeting and he winked - I knew then I wasn't the only one.
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:30 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
This makes me feel a little better - so they have trouble understanding us too. I didn't want to be one of these "ugly Americans" so I really tried to focus on what she was saying, it was English - right! - but I was lost.

But, I use to represent my company at National meetings and there was a guy from TN who was also a jabber box and when he talked, which was all the time, most people's eyes just glazed over. One time I looked at the guy leading the meeting and he winked - I knew then I wasn't the only one.
It's good to know you're not the only one. Our regional American dialects can be confusing too.
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Old 08-02-2014, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Near a river
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It's a good thing I'm a visual artist in watching this series. I can create my own version of what Gillian is saying by picking up on visual cues mostly her facial expressions.

So her speech is regional dialect, and not a reflection of education?

Oh, one thing I am picking up is the constant use of the word "right" in response to what someone else says or in response to a not-so-great situation. I actually enjoy that (mostly coming from Caroline) and I wonder if "right" in Brit vocabulary means 'OK, I'll go with the flow'—or some other unpublishable response??
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Old 08-02-2014, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Columbia MO
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Came late to this- I've enjoyed the show as much for the accents (which I pretty much understand, although I was married to a sandgrown'un and we lived in Lancs) as anything else (points if you know where my ex was from). Maybe the locals don't like it, but I enjoy Derek Jacobi's version of the accent, as much for the economy of language I heard so much in the North.

We had a friend who had a farm like Gillian's, and just like Gillian, she worked in the shops to support the farm, and just like Gillian, ran herself into the ground between the two.

As for "tea;" remember that "tea" doesn't always mean the brownish liquid. It's the evening meal in many parts of England, especially in the North.

I don't love my ex, but I still love England from, say, Birmingham up to the border, much more so than the posh south.
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Old 08-02-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Originally Posted by cyrano View Post
Came late to this- I've enjoyed the show as much for the accents (which I pretty much understand, although I was married to a sandgrown'un and we lived in Lancs) as anything else (points if you know where my ex was from). Maybe the locals don't like it, but I enjoy Derek Jacobi's version of the accent, as much for the economy of language I heard so much in the North.

We had a friend who had a farm like Gillian's, and just like Gillian, she worked in the shops to support the farm, and just like Gillian, ran herself into the ground between the two.

As for "tea;" remember that "tea" doesn't always mean the brownish liquid. It's the evening meal in many parts of England, especially in the North.

I don't love my ex, but I still love England from, say, Birmingham up to the border, much more so than the posh south.
I give up. What's a sandgrown'un?

I much prefer the north to the posh south. I like the salt of the earth people.

As for the accents, I have a Halifax friend who says she speaks in a "broad Yorkshire accent." She is sort of hard to understand, didn't go to college, but is very intelligent. I have relatives in Yorkshire who do not speak in a dialect but it's not a London type accent either. They are older and I don't know why they don't speak in dialect but maybe because they were raised in cities rather than out in the country where the old dialects might linger on.

Every night I get asked, "What's for tea?" I hate it so I just say, "I don't know. Whatever YOU are making."
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Last edited by in_newengland; 08-04-2014 at 12:06 AM..
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