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Old 01-02-2008, 12:20 PM
 
414 posts, read 1,469,235 times
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When people talk about 'retirement' they're talking about not working anymore (duh). It doesn't mean retiring from life itself. We aren't what are jobs are or were. Someone who likes to sit around probably enjoyed it just as much when working, if 'enjoy' is the right word.

Not working doesn't mean not living. There are many meaningful things people can do to stave off boredom if they choose to do so. Plenty of non-retired people sit around too, just maybe at home in front of their computers instead of in a park.

I wouldn't judge all retired people based on what a few are doing. That's like assuming we all want to live on a golf course in Arizona and play golf all day (we don't). Maybe they like sitting around outside where people are. I like to do that but must have a good book to read. :-)
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Old 01-02-2008, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes + some
2,885 posts, read 1,510,876 times
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Questioner likes to stir the pot with contrary questions. That's mostly what he does here.
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Old 01-02-2008, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,815,911 times
Reputation: 18992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathleenh54 View Post
When people talk about 'retirement' they're talking about not working anymore (duh). It doesn't mean retiring from life itself. We aren't what are jobs are or were. Someone who likes to sit around probably enjoyed it just as much when working, if 'enjoy' is the right word.

Not working doesn't mean not living. There are many meaningful things people can do to stave off boredom if they choose to do so. Plenty of non-retired people sit around too, just maybe at home in front of their computers instead of in a park.

I wouldn't judge all retired people based on what a few are doing. That's like assuming we all want to live on a golf course in Arizona and play golf all day (we don't). Maybe they like sitting around outside where people are. I like to do that but must have a good book to read. :-)

Nicely stated. That deserves a rep point.
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Old 01-03-2008, 07:00 AM
 
2,377 posts, read 4,853,167 times
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Questioner2...Did it ever cross your mind ,that instead of walking,jogging, or skate boarding past these "Old folks" and feeling such "pity" for them, that you might just stop, sit down next to one of 'them' and just say "Hi" ? They don't bite you know !!!
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Old 11-11-2008, 01:37 AM
 
1 posts, read 7,915 times
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Tesaje said: ' " I keep hearing the same sentence: "I don't know how I ever had time to work, I'm so busy all the time!" As always, your life is what you make of it. When retired, you have no one but yourself to blame for it.'

Padgett said: 'These are the same people that had no interests or friends when they were working. What you see is the personality of the Loner. When they no longer have work, they do what they used to do with their spare time, nothing. A lot of people like to sit and think. It's seems sad, but it could be that they are as content and happy as they ever were.'

janb said: 'few who have been bored in retirement, usually only in a case of having no hobbies or a distasteful outlook on life.'

What's sad is less that they are bored and more that they are probably very lonely, and they are lonely because they are boring. My question is, if it's one's own elderly single parent who is one of these people, is one wasting one's time trying to get them involved in activities? Is it sufficient just to call them regularly and visit 2-3 times per year (for someone who's long distance)? I fear my dad will deteriorate rapidly from lack of social contact since my mom died, but his lack of effort to forge any kind of social life is ruining mine. He has basically done nothing since his early retirement at 55 and now he's 74, can still pass for 55, and he's likely to continue like that into his 90's, since both my grandparents lived that long and were healthy to the end. I guess I know I need to leave him on his own until my own life is set up, but I have a horror of him being one of those old aimless guys at the mall going for days without talking to anyone except for my phone calls.
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Old 11-13-2008, 09:04 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,880,155 times
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To tell you the truth ;I see many more peole boed to death at their work really.What you are seeing is just a small time of the time they have available and they apparently like to walk and then sit around. I see young people doing thsi more often than older retired peole really.
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Old 10-02-2009, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Indiana
324 posts, read 505,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by questioner2 View Post
I think aging can be a terrible thing. We have some retired neighbors who like to go to public places and just sit there. I see them all the time at the Mall, the Library or the park and they are just sitting there. Only one at a time, not together. I suspect they are bored by the expression on their faces and just needed to get out of the house.

They looked like they could have been attractive and successful people in their day, but now life has passed them by. I picture them in a busy office or eating at a restaurant with tons of friends years ago on top of the world, but now they are all alone.

I suspect this is the reality with many retired people today.
BTW, many great responses to the original post, here.
I think, questionair2 may be a fairly young person. If he was older, he would know, that older people have often medical issues, and they no longer have the energy from 30-50 years ago. Talking about sitting in mall with 'bored face' indicates little understanding of elderly folks.
Afterall, yes, they may get bored sometime. Life is simply not that interesting at 60-80 as it was in 20s-30s. Let's not doubt about it.
Could it be, elderly often review their previous lives when they were young and life was much more exciting? Could it be, they know, they are not going to stay around for much longer? I would think so.
Next time, you young fellows see old person sitting, staring and looking bored, don't forget, they possibly went out with a thought "this may be one of my last times when I can still be a part of this world and enjoy it a little bit".
Younger folks sometimes excercise a lack of understanding for their older fellows, since they haven't experienced being old.
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Old 10-02-2009, 09:26 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,447,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulpan View Post
BTW, many great responses to the original post, here.
I think, questionair2 may be a fairly young person. If he was older, he would know, that older people have often medical issues, and they no longer have the energy from 30-50 years ago. Talking about sitting in mall with 'bored face' indicates little understanding of elderly folks.
Afterall, yes, they may get bored sometime. Life is simply not that interesting at 60-80 as it was in 20s-30s. Let's not doubt about it.
Could it be, elderly often review their previous lives when they were young and life was much more exciting? Could it be, they know, they are not going to stay around for much longer? I would think so.
Next time, you young fellows see old person sitting, staring and looking bored, don't forget, they possibly went out with a thought "this may be one of my last times when I can still be a part of this world and enjoy it a little bit".
Younger folks sometimes excercise a lack of understanding for their older fellows, since they haven't experienced being old.






---"since they haven't experienced being old "--

BINGO !

An old saying comes to mind of an old person talking to a young person----

--------" As you are, I was"
-------" As I am, you will be "
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Old 10-02-2009, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,955 posts, read 17,691,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
doubt it...

We work with a lot of seniors (some have been retired for 30+ yrs). I know of very, very few who have been bored in retirement, usually only in a case of having no hobbies or a distasteful outlook on life. Generally folks are quite content and engaged as possible... which means some go to the mall and sit, but are not bored. I was so grateful for a mall where my dad could safely go and walk / sit / enjoy people during my 30 + yrs of elder care for him. Life is not always what we "see" from a "capable" mindset.
Some serious wisdom here indeed!
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Old 10-02-2009, 12:21 PM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
doubt it...

...Life is not always what we "see" from a "capable" mindset.
The old saw is that beauty is in the eye of the beholder; it may be that the perceived boredom resides there as well.

And, I would suggest that perhaps the "capable" minds doing the seeing are living lives that are hopelessly busy, busy, busy, busy, busy with a lot of must-dos and gotta-haves that will later seem like they were the pursuits of an idiot.

And they will have been.

I'm seventy-one, retired and I quite frankly see the lives of most younger people as quite pitiable.
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