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Old 07-04-2014, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,960,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
The island of Hatteras has one main road, US 12, and at some points the land is only a quarter mile wide.

We camped there when I was a kid in the 60's. One year a storm came closer than expected, the water came across the road and our truck had water up to the wheel well. There was a Coast Guard ship off shore later on in case they needed to evacuate for the flooding. The water receded before that happened though.

I still would love to live on a barrier island.
US 12 south of a certain point (forget exactly where) is still closed - under water. Looks like any people in that area are stranded for now.

I just heard that there was an emergency rescue of a woman giving birth in a car. Reminds me of something I heard after Andrew - that big changes in barometric pressure can induce childbirth. Don't know if that's true - or what other medical things can be caused by pressure changes.

FWIW - there are barrier islands and barrier islands. Mine is relatively "civilized" - close to the mainland - with lots of access points. The ICW is narrow enough at points that a decent swimmer could swim to the mainland if necessary. If you take a look at a map - the outer banks of NC is a whole 'nother story. Robyn
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Old 07-04-2014, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,316 posts, read 12,547,140 times
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There is a big difference between a hurricane on the gulf coast or in Florida, vs. one that makes it to the northeast. It's called storm surge. Florida, and much of the Carolinas and Gulf Coast are nothing but a sand bar. A 6' storm surge is a disaster. It wasn't the wind, it was storm surge that made Sandy such a big deal. I have worked on the Texas coast. When a hurricane was predicted, the whole company moved 100 miles inland. We boarded the buildings and evacuated every piece of equipment. If it wouldn't run on the highway, we put it on a trailer. In hill country you might have to drive a quarter of a mile to high ground.
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
more worried about this tonight...........









stay safe, everyone <3
That's some storm! Diamond rings falling right along with the hail!
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:53 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
US 12 south of a certain point (forget exactly where) is still closed - under water. Looks like any people in that area are stranded for now.

I just heard that there was an emergency rescue of a woman giving birth in a car. Reminds me of something I heard after Andrew - that big changes in barometric pressure can induce childbirth. Don't know if that's true - or what other medical things can be caused by pressure changes.

FWIW - there are barrier islands and barrier islands. Mine is relatively "civilized" - close to the mainland - with lots of access points. The ICW is narrow enough at points that a decent swimmer could swim to the mainland if necessary. If you take a look at a map - the outer banks of NC is a whole 'nother story. Robyn
Theoretically that's true. I know that a number of the OB-GYN's around the area we lived in would tell their pregnant patients who were within a couple weeks of their due date to come to the hospital in the event of a hurricane warning.. Of course that could also have been in case the patients went into labor and couldn't get to the hospital during or after the hurricane.
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Old 07-04-2014, 01:44 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
We don't need any stinking hurricane in Wyoming.
Yup.
We have that happen all the time here.
Straight down from the north at 80 mph.
But with dust, not moisture.

But I saw the hurricane clouds from a plane when I flew out of NC years ago. Was told they closed the airport 3 hours after I left.

Green-tinged, very angry looking clouds.
Scarey!
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Old 07-05-2014, 10:23 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
In general I think your statement is correct. Presumably you are talking about riding one out in an area for which evacuation was recommended by responsible authorities.

However, it may be a rational decision to "ride one out" if one is far enough inland from the point of landfall. I rode out Hurricane Andrew in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with my mother in her apartment, where I was visiting at the time. (You may recall that Andrew passed over Florida then strengthened back to hurricane status over the Gulf of Mexico before turning north and making landfall once again on the Louisiana coast.)

Baton Rouge is about 80 miles from the coast, which means that most hurricanes will no longer be of hurricane strength when they get there. Of course there was some minor damage in the city and some localized flooding, and we lost power for about 24 hours. And it was scary. However, I maintain that it was a reasonable decision to stay if one is that far inland. No one that my mother knew evacuated from Baton Rouge, and it was not recommended there if I recall correctly.

We filled the bathtub in order to have water for toilet flushing (but fortunately never lost water pressure) and we had foods on hand which did not require cooking. I taped the windows with duct tape to avoid shattering if they were broken (none were), and off course we had spare flashlight batteries on hand. It was an interesting experience.
Exactly, the evacuation orders are for areas that may get a significant storm surge from a given storm, that's generally in coastal areas, and barrier island areas. There may also be evacuation orders for low lying areas that may get significant flooding from bodies of water in those areas, or are below sea level even if they're some miles from the coast ( ie, Louisiana comes to mind, but not as far inland as Baton Rouge). They also state that those who live in mobile homes, or dwellings that are too "fragile" to take hurricane winds should also find safe shelter- that could be nearby, the folks don't necessarily have to leave the area entirely, as they're expected to on the coast in an evacuation order.

Interesting that Miami-Dade's emergency management over the years has actually decreased the areas for which mandatory evacuation would be required in a major hurricane. Our house in Miami ( which was virtually decimated in Hurricane Andrew, by wind-borne debris, not storm surges, or even rising water) was in an area which, for maybe 10 years after we moved there, was identified as an evacuation zone for Cat. 4 and 5 storms. The area was about 3 miles from the coast, although it was behind a natural ridge that elevated it well above sea level. There were other areas well west of the coast, but low lying that were also designated as evacuation zones under the same circumstances.

But it seemed that with the experience of not only Andrew, but the string of hurricanes that hit parts of Florida in 2004 and 2005- including the reality of evacuating millions of residents in the designated evacuation zones when the highways out of town are woefully inadequate for doing so, and the spectre of millions of evacuees stuck on those highways in the path(s) of approaching storms, the Miami Dade ( and possibly other counties too) re-thought their evacuation plans and figured more people should just stay home. So after that, the area where we lived was no longer designated an evacuation at all. They stated with post-Andrew building codes, and hurricane preparedness, it was safer for people not on the coast to stay home and hunker down, and let those who really needed to get out of Dodge do so.

Sounds like your hurricane preparations were good for where you were located, well inland where hurricane winds would hopefully weaken some before they hit you. The only thing I'd suggest, is that if you feel some window protection is needed, perhaps some plywood or shutters you had beforehand would do a better job- the emergency management folks strongly suggest NOT taping your windows for a number of reasons. The least of all those reasons is the time wasted in doing so. I know we all thought, prior to Andrew, that taping windows was the best way to go if we didn't have shutters- I taped a few windows for storm preparations in the late 70's and 80's when we got hurricane warnings.

Hurricane experts: Stop taping windows for storms - CBS News

All that said, we went through the brunt of Andrew- we were in our house as the front end of it was destroyed, and I have never been as abjectly frightened as I know we all were that night- I really thought we would die before the hurricane passed on. So I'd never ever discourage anyone who wanted to evacuate- ie, get out of town any time a hurricane warning was issued for their area. Even if their houses were as safe as they could be, and they'd be ok in those houses during a storm. The only thing I would hope is that they'd prepare their properties before they left, ie, moving items that could become airborne ( flying debris) during hurricane winds, such as outside plants, lawn furniture, garbage cans, and so on. And they didn't wait till the last minute to leave, because they'd be caught in the throngs of other folks also trying to get out.
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Old 07-05-2014, 10:40 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I'm no storm expert (OTOH - I do know more than nothing). But - from what I recall of Hurricane Irene - it was this far away (thumb and forefinger close together) from being another Sandy in the New York metro area.

I honestly can't understand why people who manage to escape the bad effects of any particular storm that threatened them and others but wound up decimating others while they weren't harmed at all complain about the media - the weather forecasters - anyone and everyone. I just thank my lucky stars when I'm in that situation.

Like when Hurricane/Tropical Storm Jeanne hit my county - we lost power for < 24 hours - but many people in our county lost power for 2+ weeks. My late FIL was in a SNF then. And the CEO of the SNF didn't understand why so many employees were so cranky. He didn't know that many of his employees were living without power - hot water etc. I did - and suggested that he make accommodations for these employees (like giving them a place to shower in the morning). Which he did. Made a big improvement in employee morale.

Perhaps these people don't understand that hurricane forecasting - like medicine - is at best an inexact science. Robyn


That's for sure. But IMO they do a great job overall.

As for their accuracy, I guess this is based on my experiences with hurricanes, but no matter how many times I'd have to put up shutters, haul in the lawn furniture and garbage cans, and other immediate preparations for hurricanes that have to be undone after the storm doesn't hit us, I'll only be grateful that the worst didn't happen. And I'll never NOT make those preparations the next time we get a warning, because nothing happened the previous time.
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Old 07-05-2014, 10:41 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,777 posts, read 7,063,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Well, people are quick to blame the weather forecasters and yes, dire forecasts are often overblown and the "event" turns out to be minimal, pissing off those who subconsciously wanted a really big show or who evacuated with a lot of agitation. But I for one would much rather have fair warning than not. Can you imagine what it was like before weather forecasters and especially today's technology, and you were out in the fields or in some concrete building etc and suddenly hit by a tornado, hurricane, flood, blizzard, etc? If only the Donner Party had tuned in to their radio that morning.


Or paid a little more attention to their GPS?
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Old 07-05-2014, 01:43 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,321,696 times
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LOL Travellassie about the ring, she did have some big hands, didn't she

Dad used to say it's not the winds that get you, it's the flooding. IDK what they did during Andrew, I was long gone.
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Old 07-05-2014, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Because we can have a week or so to get ready. With tornadoes I don't think you get a week's warning. I've seen the sky turn purple and that was the warning or sometimes they'll predict possible tornadoes on the radio but with only a few hours to prepare.
We've always had hurricane and snow blizzard warnings in the Northeast, well, with one exeption...two years ago a snowstorm (blizzard) did come out of the blue on Halloween, dumping lots of snow and ice and knocking out power for weeks. People tend to take snowstorms up here seriously, but for hurricanes folks are naysayers (always putting down the weather reporters, disappointed when a predicted hurricane doesn't materialize). They get complacent and jaded but can lose in the end. Ninety-five percent of the time hurricanes and blizzards are predicted, whether or not they materialize and whether or not folks heed the warning. There is a difference between a "warning" and a "watch."

The two tornados that struck WMass, as you say, came out of nowhere. One moment the skies were clear and sunny; the next everything got incredibly still and then bam. First ever in my lifetime remembrance in these parts.
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