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Old 07-05-2014, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
[/b]Or paid a little more attention to their GPS?
Or smartphone, LOL.
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Old 07-05-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
We've always had hurricane and snow blizzard warnings in the Northeast, well, with one exeption...two years ago a snowstorm (blizzard) did come out of the blue on Halloween, dumping lots of snow and ice and knocking out power for weeks. People tend to take snowstorms up here seriously, but for hurricanes folks are naysayers (always putting down the weather reporters, disappointed when a predicted hurricane doesn't materialize). They get complacent and jaded but can lose in the end. Ninety-five percent of the time hurricanes and blizzards are predicted, whether or not they materialize and whether or not folks heed the warning. There is a difference between a "warning" and a "watch."

The two tornados that struck WMass, as you say, came out of nowhere. One moment the skies were clear and sunny; the next everything got incredibly still and then bam. First ever in my lifetime remembrance in these parts.


I can imagine. Tornadoes give little warning anywhere, but the folks in the "tornado belt" know to expect them when the weather conditions are conducive to their formation. I can imagine how much of a surprise tornadoes would be in areas ( like the northeast) where they are not that common.
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Old 07-05-2014, 02:55 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,234,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I can imagine how much of a surprise tornadoes would be in areas (like the northeast) where they are not that common.
Even the West

Tornado hits Perris CA (2008)
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Old 07-05-2014, 03:14 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,581 posts, read 10,926,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
The Teton-Yellowstone Tornado of 1987 which set an altitude record touched down at 7000', then clmbed the hill to 10,000' crossing the Continenal Divide.

So, never say never.

Teton
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Old 07-05-2014, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
[/b]

That's for sure. But IMO they do a great job overall.

As for their accuracy, I guess this is based on my experiences with hurricanes, but no matter how many times I'd have to put up shutters, haul in the lawn furniture and garbage cans, and other immediate preparations for hurricanes that have to be undone after the storm doesn't hit us, I'll only be grateful that the worst didn't happen. And I'll never NOT make those preparations the next time we get a warning, because nothing happened the previous time.
Ditto on your first paragraph.

As for the second - IIRC - you have impact windows now (we do as well). They are no-muss no-fuss in terms of storm preparation (although various generations of impact windows have various issues). You don't have to do a thing. Second best IMO is heavy duty installed accordion shutters. Pull them closed (from the inside) - turn a few screws - and that's it. I wouldn't for a minute have shutters that I kept in my garage - and had to hang before a storm (even before I was a senior and now especially that I am a senior). Or deal with the cheap plywood alternative either. FWIW - the roll up shutters that some places near us had failed miserably during Andrew. Rolled up like sardine can lids. Perhaps there are better ones now. If not - I wouldn't use those either.

Our garage doors have hurricane reinforcements. Not "activated" most of the time (when "activated" - you can't open the garage door!). Before a storm - or if we're traveling during hurricane season - we have to "activate" them. Which consists of closing the doors - and installing some heavy duty "pins" in the reinforcing vertical pieces of metal that run from ceiling to floor on each garage door to lock them in place. It's a somewhat tedious job that takes about 10-15 minutes per garage door (we have 3). But it's not physically onerous at all. The most important thing we do WRT this is we leave our "garage clicker" at home when the doors are in "lock down" mode. Otherwise - we might forget the doors are "locked down" and we might wreck them (and/or the garage door opener motor) by trying to open them with the clicker when we got back home.

One accommodation we've made as we've gotten older is we keep less stuff on our back porch now. So there's less stuff we might have to move into the garage/inside. And most of what we might have to move is either collapsible or pretty light resin furniture. Robyn
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Old 07-05-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,035,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
The Teton-Yellowstone Tornado of 1987 which set an altitude record touched down at 7000', then clmbed the hill to 10,000' crossing the Continenal Divide.

So, never say never.

Teton
I've lived long enough to know how foolish it is to say "never"...

I guess your Teton-Yellowstone tornado story has blown another misconception I always had to smithereens. I always thought mountains broke up tornadoes, so they didn't occur in mountainous areas.
So, that's another never gone out of my book.
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Old 07-05-2014, 06:56 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,035,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Ditto on your first paragraph.

As for the second - IIRC - you have impact windows now (we do as well). They are no-muss no-fuss in terms of storm preparation (although various generations of impact windows have various issues). You don't have to do a thing. Second best IMO is heavy duty installed accordion shutters. Pull them closed (from the inside) - turn a few screws - and that's it. I wouldn't for a minute have shutters that I kept in my garage - and had to hang before a storm (even before I was a senior and now especially that I am a senior). Or deal with the cheap plywood alternative either. FWIW - the roll up shutters that some places near us had failed miserably during Andrew. Rolled up like sardine can lids. Perhaps there are better ones now. If not - I wouldn't use those either.

Our garage doors have hurricane reinforcements. Not "activated" most of the time (when "activated" - you can't open the garage door!). Before a storm - or if we're traveling during hurricane season - we have to "activate" them. Which consists of closing the doors - and installing some heavy duty "pins" in the reinforcing vertical pieces of metal that run from ceiling to floor on each garage door to lock them in place. It's a somewhat tedious job that takes about 10-15 minutes per garage door (we have 3). But it's not physically onerous at all. The most important thing we do WRT this is we leave our "garage clicker" at home when the doors are in "lock down" mode. Otherwise - we might forget the doors are "locked down" and we might wreck them (and/or the garage door opener motor) by trying to open them with the clicker when we got back home.

One accommodation we've made as we've gotten older is we keep less stuff on our back porch now. So there's less stuff we might have to move into the garage/inside. And most of what we might have to move is either collapsible or pretty light resin furniture. Robyn
Yes, we do have hurricane impact windows on the house we live in how ( it's our retirement house), so we'd not have to mess with shutters or panels at this point. The house was finished in 2008, and our contractor went by Miami Dade hurricane building codes, so the garage also meets those codes. Our garage door has a series of both horizontal and vertical metal bars ( these look to be stainless steel) about 18 inches apart across the doors, and possibly some bolting on the sides ( I'm not sure what I a looking at). There is a lever that is pushed that will prevent the garage doors from opening, but I didn't think that was hurricane protection. And the doors to the outside are metal and open in, according to the code.

And that's a good idea about having lighter outdoor furniture so you're not lugging heavy stuff into the garage in your old age!

We did have a rather eclectic collection of shutters and panels on our house in Miami- and they didn't all meet the hurricane codes passed by the county in 1994-5 or whenever it was. The house was rebuilt and passed the county final inspection prior to the passage of these codes, and we figured we'd use the shutters that survived Andrew. We had bahamas shutters on most of the windows in Andrew, and aluminum panels for the sliding glass doors ( took me three years after we moved into that house to persuade my husband that we should spend the money to make sure all the windows and sliders had hurricane protection, and we were one of the few houses that did have window covering prior to Andrew). We replaced the shutters on the east side of the house, including the addition, with accordion shutters, but they were so danged expensive we couldn't swing them for the whole house. So the sliders had aluminum panels, as did a picture window in the front of the house. We left the bahama shutters up for the rest of the windows. We probably should have replaced all those with covering that met the hurricane codes, but for several reasons we didn't. As time went on, it was hard to find a reputable shutter company, even those that had been good before seemed to have a propensity to rip off customers, and frankly, after we had seen the effects of debris flying in 160+ MPH winds in Andrew on shutters, and even CBS, watched the county keep lowering the criteria for "hurricane wind resistance, or debris resistance ( much much lower than the 9x12 at 160+ MPH that went through our shutters in Andrew), we figured we'd just do the best we could for window protection.
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Old 07-07-2014, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,932,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
...And the doors to the outside are metal and open in, according to the code.
Are you sure about that? Our doors open "out" - so the wind can't blow them in.

Quote:
And that's a good idea about having lighter outdoor furniture so you're not lugging heavy stuff into the garage in your old age!
We bought one of these earlier this year.

Toscana Round Dining Table 47 inch White NR-40123.00 | CozyDays

Not only is it light - but resin is one of the few materials that doesn't rust/corrode here in Florida.

This morning I'm glad that this storm isn't in our neck of the woods!

Super Typhoon Neoguri Is About To Rake All Of Japan - Business Insider

Robyn
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Old 07-07-2014, 10:43 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,035,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Are you sure about that? Our doors open "out" - so the wind can't blow them in.



We bought one of these earlier this year.

Toscana Round Dining Table 47 inch White NR-40123.00 | CozyDays

Not only is it light - but resin is one of the few materials that doesn't rust/corrode here in Florida.

This morning I'm glad that this storm isn't in our neck of the woods!

Super Typhoon Neoguri Is About To Rake All Of Japan - Business Insider

Robyn
You're right, the doors open out, as per building code. Guess I had a senior moment there.

I'll have to look around for some patio furniture made of resin or if I can find something I like, plastic- that's even lighter, I think.

We've got an old set of tables and chairs made of wrought iron, and they are way overdue for scraping the rust off and repainting- we brought them with us from Miami and I sure wish I had given them away along with the other stuff we gave to our lawn guy there, but DH the packrat was so bent out of shape over everything that I did give away ( it's called downsizing but he doesn't understand the concept), I didn't include that patio furniture with the giveaways. Scraping and painting that furniture is on his "honey-do" list ( which he sees as a "round-tuit" list) and I don't think it'll happen soon. I'll be darned if the maintenance fairy ( that'd be me) will add painting that furniture to the other things on the fairy list, so that furniture may disappear one of these times so we can replace it with something easier to maintain.

Hope the folks in Japan are properly hunkered down for that storm!
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