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Old 07-01-2014, 08:37 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Hurricane Irene was a major disaster for much of the state of Vermont too. We had just returned from a trip to Vermont when it struck. It was heart breaking to see the pictures of places we had just been. Lots of flooding of mountain valleys and destruction of bridges. Vermonters are strong people and are prepared but it is still a disaster when someone is injured and no one can reach them because of washed out roads and bridges that are just gone.
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,873,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
The mobile home park residents on the Florida Coast should probably evacuate whenever a hurricane evacuation notice is issued
True. Those mobile homes are hurricane (and tornado) magnets.
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Old 07-01-2014, 09:40 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,760 posts, read 7,041,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
Which is more of an inconvenience?

Having to return to your undamaged home after you evacuate and the storm has passed.

Or

Having to stand on the roof of your flooded home waiting for a Nat'l Guard truck to take you to a shelter.

Well that's a no-brainer! I just wanted to add that all it takes is one hurricane where your house is wrecked, and you have to go through the hassle of rebuilding, and all that entails, and you'll be forever grateful that if you have to evacuate in the future, the storm didn't come that way after all and your property is intact.
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Old 07-01-2014, 10:14 PM
 
10,818 posts, read 8,067,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
There's nothing I dread more than a tornado; there's usually little or no warning. Hurricanes and blizzards you can be ready for.
Odd, we in tornado alley say we at least have warning but those poor folks in earthquake country get nada. Guess it's all relative.
In 65 years, I don't recall a tornado ever hitting my neck of the woods without warning. Granted, sometimes that warning is only 20-30 minutes but that's enough to hit the basement or central bath or closet.

Occasionally there's the mega-killer funnel for which warnings are futile for some folks, but the same is true for hurricanes and blizzards, yes?
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Old 07-01-2014, 11:37 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,847 posts, read 18,867,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
Odd, we in tornado alley say we at least have warning but those poor folks in earthquake country get nada. Guess it's all relative.
In 65 years, I don't recall a tornado ever hitting my neck of the woods without warning. Granted, sometimes that warning is only 20-30 minutes but that's enough to hit the basement or central bath or closet.

Occasionally there's the mega-killer funnel for which warnings are futile for some folks, but the same is true for hurricanes and blizzards, yes?
Not really. Today they can track storms like hurricanes and blizzards for days although they can't predict exactly where they will strike. Hurricanes don't usually get this far north but in the southern states there is usually enough warning that people can move inland to safety. I think the problems occur with poorer people who don't have transportation or can't afford any place to stay so they stay in their homes. Not too sure about that though.

With blizzards there is plenty of warning. They are horrible storms but it's almost become a joke--"Gotta get the bread and milk, gotta get the bread and milk"--and the grocery stores are mobbed with people stocking up on food for the blizzard. There isn't much you can do except make sure you are prepared and then just sit tight and wait for it.

We had a few hurricanes back in the 50s that weren't well predicted and they did damage, took out roads, crushed houses, knocked the power off. And of course the famous hurricane of 1938 back when there was absolutely no warning whatsoever. We've all heard about it from our parents. Today you would board up your windows and probably get out if you were in the danger zone and you knew a hurricane was coming.

A couple of tornadoes did strike this state about two years ago. I don't think there was much warning and people aren't used to tornadoes here anyway so there was a lot of damage. Previous to that I don't remember a major tornado since the 50s. Our blizzards/Nor'easters are what we fear the most in the northeast but we do get ample warning.
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Old 07-01-2014, 11:49 PM
 
10,818 posts, read 8,067,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Not really. Today they can track storms like hurricanes and blizzards for days although they can't predict exactly where they will strike.
Sorry, your point is not quite clear. This differs from tornadoes, how... exactly?
Not trying to be a hard ass, just don't see where you're coming from.
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Old 07-02-2014, 01:45 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,847 posts, read 18,867,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
Sorry, your point is not quite clear. This differs from tornadoes, how... exactly?
Not trying to be a hard ass, just don't see where you're coming from.
Because we can have a week or so to get ready. With tornadoes I don't think you get a week's warning. I've seen the sky turn purple and that was the warning or sometimes they'll predict possible tornadoes on the radio but with only a few hours to prepare.

When those tornadoes struck a few years ago the people had almost no warning and some people were driving in their cars while blizzard people would have been at home, hunkered down. People didn't have time to store drinking water in case the water supply was off, people didn't have time to tie things down or bring things in from outside. In some cases things like a table on the deck could become a flying missile. Before a blizzard you'd make sure everything was in a safe place and you'd have your snow shovel somewhere safe where you could grab it but it wouldn't be sitting outside where it could get blown away or fly through someone's window.

Maybe you get good warnings where you live but out here where tornadoes are very rare, no one expects them and even the weathermen don't seem to know one when they see one. Just trying to clarify.
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Old 07-02-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,895,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
Odd, we in tornado alley say we at least have warning but those poor folks in earthquake country get nada. Guess it's all relative.
In 65 years, I don't recall a tornado ever hitting my neck of the woods without warning. Granted, sometimes that warning is only 20-30 minutes but that's enough to hit the basement or central bath or closet.

Occasionally there's the mega-killer funnel for which warnings are futile for some folks, but the same is true for hurricanes and blizzards, yes?
No hurricanes and blizzards you get warnings days sometimes a week in advance, they don't just sprout up out of no where as a tornado or earthquake can.

Actually the area in the US with the most stable weather as far as catastrophic weather is the North East.

We don't get killer tornadoes, earthquakes, mudslides or the devastating fires areas like Arizona, California, Colorado etc get.
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Old 07-02-2014, 06:20 AM
 
649 posts, read 554,493 times
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I am going to come at this from a different perspective. Some of the posters on this thread is exactly what drives emergency managers crazy. Your damned if you do and damned if you don't.

If your not telling people whats going on, providing warnings and "what to do" advice, then the public will eat you alive if something bad happens.

But if your providing this information so that YOU the citizen can make an informed decision, then your crying wolf each time something doesn't happen.

NO ONE CAN CONTROL THE WEATHER. It would be great if we could say with 100 percent certainty that on July 4, 2014, a category 4 hurricane will hit Daytona, Florida at 0954 in the morning. But we can't, so live with it.

I have responded to Andrew, Katrina, Ike and the Haiti earthquake, and until you have either lived through that or worked in that environment, you have no clue what the reality really is.

So when you choose to be selfish and not follow recommendations, why should they, meaning first responders, have to come save you? You don't want to evacuate, understand, but don't expect anyone to come get you either. And use this permanent marker to write your name and ssn on your arm so we can identify the body quicker.

Does anyone here really know what it takes to evacuate 2 million people? Shelter them? Feed them? Get them back to their homes, if they still exist?

Probably not, but feel free to continue to whine and ***** about the people that actually do and are doing their absolute best to help out.

Rant off.
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Old 07-02-2014, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,935,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StressedOutNYer View Post
...Gloria in 1985 was bad for us here. Superstorm Sandy was worse, mainly because Gloria was a fast-moving storm but Sandy was more leisurely and thus was able to do more damage. Gloria hit at low tide; Sandy encompassed two high tides, if I recall correctly.

But other than those two, there really have been no significant hurricanes this far up the coast that I can recall, and I've lived here for 60+ years. I think there may have been one pretty bad hurricane in the 1950s (?) but that's about it. We've had worse problems from the nor'easters; they bring down trees and power lines...
That's like saying "other than that Mrs. Lincoln - how did you like the play?".

Hurricane Sandy caused 100+ deaths in the US - and resulted in $100 billion+ in property damage.

Hurricane Sandy Fast Facts - CNN.com

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/28/op...osts.html?_r=0

I think some of the loss of life can be attributed to complacency induced in part by Hurricane Irene. I think that one thing you learn over the years is just because the last storm was a dud doesn't mean the next one will be (note that Irene wasn't a dud for some people - but it was for others).

FWIW - the only thing that gives me comfort during hurricane season is watching how the steering currents are taking the storms (if they're taking them up north - and not west - like we're seeing with Arthur now). These trends can last for a whole season - but there's no guarantee. Robyn

Last edited by Robyn55; 07-02-2014 at 07:03 AM..
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