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Old 07-02-2014, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,108 posts, read 24,945,519 times
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Anyway to answer the original question even though in NJ and chances slim of a major hurricane, yes we are ready even have a generator as generators come in handy during wicked NO'Easters too when you can lose power for a few days.
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Old 07-02-2014, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,987,086 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
The media love to churn storms into catastrophic events regardless if there is a valid reason or not.
They want people glued to their channel. IMHO that gets people burnt out and not caring. A case of the boy that cried wolf too many times.
I don't think you can blame the media. Because hurricanes are unpredictable in terms of where they're going to strike - and being 10 miles in one direction or another can make a huge difference in terms of impact/damage. Also - hurricane prediction is still imprecise - especially when it comes to storm intensity. A storm can be a cat 1 one day - a cat 3 the next 10 hours before landfall. I recall that as Hurricane Andrew approached Florida - it was originally projected to hit central/north Dade County (when it was very near the coast) but wobbled to the south at the last minute and hit south Dade instead. South Dade was decimated - but people in north Dade were pretty much business as usual 48 hours later.

A third very complicating factor is you can't tell millions of people (and that's what we're dealing with in terms of many coastal areas today - millions of people) to evacuate at 6 am when a storm is scheduled to hit at noon. So what do you do if you're in charge? Order millions of people to evacuate - perhaps unnecessarily? Or tell them to stay put - possibly putting their lives at risk? This was the conundrum faced by state officials during Hurricane Floyd:

Hurricane Floyd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Another factor is where particular people live. Where I live - many people (especially newcomers) don't even realize we live on a barrier island (ocean to the east - intracoastal waterway to the west). So - in any significant storm - you have water rising on both sides. Which can cut off evacuation routes. Note that most (maybe all) coastal areas have evacuation maps that one should take a look at - especially if one is new to an area. Robyn
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Old 07-02-2014, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,987,086 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
Hurricane Irene was mostly a non-event for NYC and LI but did major damage upstate. She was the 7th costliest on record. Here's a link to damage by region; NYS had 10 deaths, but if it doesn't happen in the metro area, it isn't news. There's a bridge here that was washed out by Irene and won't be finished with repairs until 2015, the flooding was incredible. It was much worse north of here...
I think that's true in other places too. After Andrew - the media took a look at downtown Miami. It was ok - so the media moved on (to Louisiana IIRC). And completely missed the story of the devastation to the south of downtown. And there wasn't a lot of media coverage of all the storms Florida had in 2004-05. Perhaps because none hit a major city. I sometimes think that the media doesn't cover storms enough if it can't find nearby places to stay with lots of hotels/restaurants. Robyn

Last edited by Robyn55; 07-02-2014 at 07:40 AM..
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Old 07-02-2014, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,752 posts, read 49,586,897 times
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I have 'survived' a number of hurricanes, though honestly for most of them I was out to sea. Generally we went deep.

During my career, there have been two hurricanes, where we were caught in shallow water, not able to go deep, in a timely fashion. Those are ugly scenes.

Since I have retired, we settled in a region on the East Coast that only sees the tail ends of hurricanes. Maybe 50 knot winds, not a big deal at all.
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Old 07-02-2014, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,987,086 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG120 View Post
I am going to come at this from a different perspective. Some of the posters on this thread is exactly what drives emergency managers crazy. Your damned if you do and damned if you don't.

If your not telling people whats going on, providing warnings and "what to do" advice, then the public will eat you alive if something bad happens.

But if your providing this information so that YOU the citizen can make an informed decision, then your crying wolf each time something doesn't happen.

NO ONE CAN CONTROL THE WEATHER. It would be great if we could say with 100 percent certainty that on July 4, 2014, a category 4 hurricane will hit Daytona, Florida at 0954 in the morning. But we can't, so live with it.

I have responded to Andrew, Katrina, Ike and the Haiti earthquake, and until you have either lived through that or worked in that environment, you have no clue what the reality really is.

So when you choose to be selfish and not follow recommendations, why should they, meaning first responders, have to come save you? You don't want to evacuate, understand, but don't expect anyone to come get you either. And use this permanent marker to write your name and ssn on your arm so we can identify the body quicker.

Does anyone here really know what it takes to evacuate 2 million people? Shelter them? Feed them? Get them back to their homes, if they still exist?

Probably not, but feel free to continue to whine and ***** about the people that actually do and are doing their absolute best to help out.

Rant off.
Exactly. And - since this is the retirement forum - and we're talking about seniors - many can't evacuate voluntarily on their own. They need help in terms of leaving and a place to stay during an evacuation. Many counties/cities/etc. have plans to use buses to evacuate those who can't help themselves (whether they're seniors/disabled people/sick people/poor people/whatever) - and to take them to shelters inland (usually places like schools). It takes a lot of organization and resources to do this properly. And those of us who don't need help just become part of the problem - not the solution - when we ignore what emergency managers are telling us to do.

Also - if we have friends/family who need extra help - we should help them if we can. We have been and are prepared to do this for some people. Like my father today. Also - we should check on the plans senior facilities have for these situations if we have friends/families who live in them. IMO - my father's senior independent living facility has a totally stupid hurricane plan (as did my late FIL's SNF). So we have to/had to make our own plans.

BTW - what kind of emergency responder are you?
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Old 07-02-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Florida -
8,786 posts, read 10,896,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I don't know what the heck you're talking about. A 5 second Google for major hurricanes turned up Wilma in 2005.

And the past is no guarantee of the future.

Hurricane Floyd was a dud in NE Florida - but what if it had gone 2 degrees here - or 3 degrees there?

FWIW - I think you're an example of ignorant people in Florida. You'll stay put unless and until you're on the roof of your house screaming for the government to help you. Don't expect me and others to put the lives of government employees at risk to bail you out if you get into that predicament <shrug>. Hope you're a good swimmer. Robyn

OK, let's call Wilma a 2005 "Florida" hurricane --- even though the weather forecasters moved it's Florida status back and forth multiple times between Tropical storm and hurricane; ... and the winds were only 40 mph when it crossed Naples. That's still no Florida 'hurricanes' since 2005 (9-years!). Of course, that doesn't mean Florida will have no hurricanes in the future. But, the oft-repeated title "hurricane alley" is hardly relevant either.

A few years ago, Florida Today ran a front-page article about Florida as "Hurricane Alley". The accompanying map made Florida look like a rats nest of purported 'hurricane paths' ... until one actually read the details and realized that most of the paths hyping 'reported hurricanes' occurred in the 1800's and early 1900's, --- many of which were not confirmed Florida landfalls or verified wind speed.

Perhaps you are confusing Katrina with something else or are buying into the media frenzy yourself. When, for example, was the last time when anyone stranded on a Florida rooftop during a hurricane, was rescued, while screaming for government employee help?

My intention is not to downplay the very real danger of hurricanes. I'm simply tired of every "ignorant hurricane forecaster" (aka: TV weatherman) screaming 24/7 that "we're all going to die" - every time a storm forms off the coast of Africa. IMO, this creates a level of ho-hum complacency that could cost a lot of people their lives, if/when a major hurricane does hit!
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Old 07-02-2014, 09:06 AM
 
651 posts, read 556,987 times
Reputation: 1887
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
My intention is not to downplay the very real danger of hurricanes. I'm simply tired of every "ignorant hurricane forecaster" (aka: TV weatherman) screaming 24/7 that "we're all going to die" - every time a storm forms off the coast of Africa. IMO, this creates a level of ho-hum complacency that could cost a lot of people their lives, if/when a major hurricane does hit!
You are right and this is a very real danger. I bolded the last part because this is a major challenge.

The media does hype these events because it drives ratings which improves the bottom line. Much like when they figured out how to make money off the news, it was no longer objective.

Jim Cantore standing on the beach screaming about whatever he screams about does us no good.

Use of the media is a very delicate balancing act. How much is too much and how much is not enough?

And to Robyn55's question, I am an emergency manager.
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Old 07-02-2014, 10:03 AM
 
338 posts, read 626,872 times
Reputation: 568
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG120 View Post
I am going to come at this from a different perspective. Some of the posters on this thread is exactly what drives emergency managers crazy. Your damned if you do and damned if you don't.

If your not telling people whats going on, providing warnings and "what to do" advice, then the public will eat you alive if something bad happens.

But if your providing this information so that YOU the citizen can make an informed decision, then your crying wolf each time something doesn't happen.

NO ONE CAN CONTROL THE WEATHER. It would be great if we could say with 100 percent certainty that on July 4, 2014, a category 4 hurricane will hit Daytona, Florida at 0954 in the morning. But we can't, so live with it.

I have responded to Andrew, Katrina, Ike and the Haiti earthquake, and until you have either lived through that or worked in that environment, you have no clue what the reality really is.

So when you choose to be selfish and not follow recommendations, why should they, meaning first responders, have to come save you? You don't want to evacuate, understand, but don't expect anyone to come get you either. And use this permanent marker to write your name and ssn on your arm so we can identify the body quicker.

Does anyone here really know what it takes to evacuate 2 million people? Shelter them? Feed them? Get them back to their homes, if they still exist?

Probably not, but feel free to continue to whine and ***** about the people that actually do and are doing their absolute best to help out.

Rant off.
Have to agree with you on this one. We were on Cape Cod for Hurricane Bob in 91. My dad was involved with civil defense at the time, and oh the stories he told. It wasn't just the people who didn't evacuate, but the people who thought it would be exciting to go down to the beach and watch the waves and then needed to be rescued. There was one guy who wanted to be up close and personal by walking out on a jetty - naturally he needed to be rescued when he was swept away.

Yes, the media tends to over-hype, but when officials are telling you to evacuate, you really should be listening.
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Old 07-02-2014, 10:14 AM
 
29,910 posts, read 34,970,994 times
Reputation: 11812
Sorta funny retirees disagreeing about the need for Hurricane preparedness. Sorta like the discussions and debates 40-50 years or more ago about investing and retirement preparedness. Sorta recall some of the warnings then being called over hype. Oh well as with retirement we follow our own path and build our preferred shelter from storms realized or not.
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Old 07-02-2014, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,108 posts, read 24,945,519 times
Reputation: 11146
Quote:
Originally Posted by fay111 View Post
Have to agree with you on this one. We were on Cape Cod for Hurricane Bob in 91. My dad was involved with civil defense at the time, and oh the stories he told. It wasn't just the people who didn't evacuate, but the people who thought it would be exciting to go down to the beach and watch the waves and then needed to be rescued. There was one guy who wanted to be up close and personal by walking out on a jetty - naturally he needed to be rescued when he was swept away.

Yes, the media tends to over-hype, but when officials are telling you to evacuate, you really should be listening.
Yes...I still remember Gov Christie yelling when people were still on beach watching the rough surf...get the hell off the beach
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