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Old 07-02-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Getting as dark as night right now at 4:20, with thunder rolling in. This could be serious. I'd better check the news. I'm home alone with two terrified dogs. Aren't they supposed to protect their owners?
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Old 07-02-2014, 02:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Getting as dark as night right now at 4:20, with thunder rolling in. This could be serious. I'd better check the news. I'm home alone with two terrified dogs. Aren't they supposed to protect their owners?
Best of luck there are some nasty ones out there. We are suppose to travel tomorrow.
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Old 07-02-2014, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
OK, let's call Wilma a 2005 "Florida" hurricane --- even though the weather forecasters moved it's Florida status back and forth multiple times between Tropical storm and hurricane; ... and the winds were only 40 mph when it crossed Naples. That's still no Florida 'hurricanes' since 2005 (9-years!). Of course, that doesn't mean Florida will have no hurricanes in the future. But, the oft-repeated title "hurricane alley" is hardly relevant either.

A few years ago, Florida Today ran a front-page article about Florida as "Hurricane Alley". The accompanying map made Florida look like a rats nest of purported 'hurricane paths' ... until one actually read the details and realized that most of the paths hyping 'reported hurricanes' occurred in the 1800's and early 1900's, --- many of which were not confirmed Florida landfalls or verified wind speed.

Perhaps you are confusing Katrina with something else or are buying into the media frenzy yourself. When, for example, was the last time when anyone stranded on a Florida rooftop during a hurricane, was rescued, while screaming for government employee help?

My intention is not to downplay the very real danger of hurricanes. I'm simply tired of every "ignorant hurricane forecaster" (aka: TV weatherman) screaming 24/7 that "we're all going to die" - every time a storm forms off the coast of Africa. IMO, this creates a level of ho-hum complacency that could cost a lot of people their lives, if/when a major hurricane does hit!
Ten years ago was 7/2/2004. Since then we've had Hurricanes Wilma - Rita - Katrina - Dennis - Jeanne - Ivan - Frances and Charley. None since Wilma. But what does that mean? Nothing. We could have another bad year like 2004 in 2014/2015/2016 - or we might not get hit by another hurricane for 3+ years. Also - tropical storms aren't always benign. We had pretty bad flooding in my metro area as a result of TS Debby (a huge wet storm that hung around for days).

Also - you can't tell anyone who was here in 2004 that this isn't Hurricane Alley. What a mess that single year was. Here's a good graphic of 3 of the 4 majors:

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/...1896.htmlstory

The Orlando paper doesn't show Ivan (the 4th major) - which affected the Panhandle. Perhaps my memory fails me - but I seem to recall that in 2004 - there wasn't a single one of Florida's 67 counties that wasn't affected by a hurricane (although - for example - storms like Jeanne and Francis were tropical storm force when they came to my neck of the woods). Also - there haven't been a lot of people in Florida for a very long period of time. If we could have a map of Florida hurricanes for the past 500 years - you probably couldn't see the outline of the state underneath all the storm paths.

And we have to remember that Florida isn't the only state in the country. Hurricanes hit states all along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. (So I guess my thread is misnamed - sorry to you people on the Gulf coast!)

Actually - the last famous news story I recall about someone calling for help was when the artist James Rosenquist refused to evacuate Sanibel Island (I forget for which storm). After government people refused to "rescue" him - he hired a private helicopter to do so.

And I'm not confusing Katrina with anything. Here in Florida - most of our bad storms have been wind events - not flooding events. People would be too scared to climb up on their roofs during a storm - and many don't have roofs in great shape (or any roofs at all) after.

I've tried to pay some attention to the news about Arthur today. And it doesn't seem at all alarmist to me (which is totally appropriate at this point). Just some observations that 4th of July events like fireworks in various areas may have to be canceled. Note that I get most of my storm info from several factual websites - like the NHC. Also note that this website often crashes before and during bad storms. So I usually have a couple of back-up "mirror websites" bookmarked. Like this one:

Hurricane and Storm Tracking

BTW - I think one factor that leads people to be complacent is they think they've been through a hurricane when they haven't. Like many people in Broward and Palm Beach counties will tell you they "survived" Hurricane Andrew - when the highest sustained winds they might have had were 30-50 mph. I personally have never been through a hurricane - because I've always lived in mandatory evacuation areas. The worst I've experienced at home was a strong tropical storm with sustained winds of perhaps 60 mph and gusts up to about 80 mph. That was plenty scary enough - and reinforced my decision to leave for hurricanes. Robyn

Last edited by Robyn55; 07-02-2014 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 07-02-2014, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,217 posts, read 8,302,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post

My intention is not to downplay the very real danger of hurricanes. I'm simply tired of every "ignorant hurricane forecaster" (aka: TV weatherman) screaming 24/7 that "we're all going to die" - every time a storm forms off the coast of Africa. IMO, this creates a level of ho-hum complacency that could cost a lot of people their lives, if/when a major hurricane does hit!
Those ignorant forcasters screamed bloody hell for Katrina in 2005 and those dumbasses wouldn't leave.

I know those exact people also, they've never left for a hurricane before and not about to do it now and brag about it.

Unfortunately, they left in body bags.

I'd much rather get scared to death by Jim Cantore and leave than drown in my living room.
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Old 07-02-2014, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
Just wondering~~

Do some people stay because they feel they can reduce the damage to their personal belongings (furniture, clothes)? What about looters?

I'll be moving to the NC coast (Wilmington) and this whole thing scares me.
The main problem is potential looters. In some places more than others. Where I live - I don't worry about it too much. Because I live on a barrier island where you need a government issued pass to get back after a storm. It's certainly not a perfect system - but it's better than none. And looters generally tend to come out after storms - not before.

I read stories that some people who died or were injured on Staten Island during Sandy stayed in place to protect their property. But don't know whether the stories I read are true. Robyn
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by Umbria View Post
<gulp> Oh shat I may have to rethink this
Don't worry about it.

You will just have to get in "synch" with your new surroundings. Learn the risks where you'll be living in the specific place you'll be living. How to insure against them in the way that makes the most sense. And how to prepare for them. Learn how to follow NHC storm and similar reports. Learn your evacuation routes (if applicable) - and have a list of what you have to take if you have to evacuate. And learn how to make easy to cancel hotel reservations in the unlikely event you have to evacuate. And always keep at least a few dollars in an emergency fund to pay for storm related expenses. Can't say I enjoy doing this stuff - but it's kind of second nature to me now. And it's less scary to me than driving through isolated Rocky Mountain roads in the winter (did that one winter for a few months - and it was so foreign to me that it was terrifying). Robyn
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:11 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
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Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
That's a lot better info than "we never get major hurricanes in our area"
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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My Wilmington , N.C. friends have already left for relatives more inland. They ar smart as they've been in the middle of it too many times to stick around to wait and see.
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
LOL Umb, seriously, the hard winters are more difficult that a 'cane. They never last more than 24 hours. Heck, my folks didn't evac for Andrew.......

Robyn, no generator????????

Our plans stay the same year round. Food, water, gas, generator, tools, tarps, easy grab personal file, 500 dollars in singles, two four wheel drive vehicles, a backhoe. Plenty of wood to secure windows if needed. We aren't planning on evacuating, though; I don't have a horse trailer.
No generator. I analyze the situation this way.

Any generator that could power my A/C would be a monster (and A/C is the most important thing for me in the summer). Expensive to install and maintain (and replace when necessary). I know people who have them. They have to be fired up once a month to be tested and run properly. And I would get the diesel fuel to run a contraption like this where after a storm?

The power infrastructure where I live is pretty good. Power lines on those big concrete things to my community (where all utilities are underground). Our power company is small and serves a very limited area. And its employees are now pretty sophisticated compared to 20 years ago (when we moved here - and no one knew how to work on a live wire). IOW - if it's a simple power issue - a few messed up lines here and there - our power company can handle it quickly. Like it did in the 2004 storms. No power outage > 24 hours. In contrast - areas a little to the south of us where the power company was FPL had to wait for weeks for their power to be restored. Not because the damage was greater than what we had. But simply because the 2004 storms affected millions of FPL customers - and its repair crews were short handed. Ours at our local power company weren't short handed.

So I figure we're good to go up to a cat 1. And - if I'm wrong - I'll stay in a hotel (like I did after Hurricane Andrew for about 6 weeks - our insurance policy covers that - many storm policies in Florida don't).

I figure in a cat 2 or stronger - so many things will be toast where I live that I won't be longing to return for a while. Until some semblance of order is restored.

FWIW - we had friends in Dade County who had horses. They evacuated their horses (like they evacuated themselves). Many horses whose owners didn't evacuate them died.

$500 for a hurricane is peanuts. And why singles for cripes sake? What do you think a buck will buy you after a hurricane?

I don't know if you're a senior. But - assuming you are - since this is the Retirement Forum - I suggest you try to install all that plywood on a "dry run" at least once before you might have to. It's no easy task. I recommend either installed shutters or storm impact windows. No muss - no fuss.

Note that I don't know where you live. So your hurricane risk may be less than ours. OTOH - even in parts of Florida that are considerably inland - medium winds and fairly big deal flooding can be issues (we had friends in Gainesville who were flooded out of their houses in 2004 and - in 2004 - there were at least tens of thousands of blue roofs in Florida from one side of the state to the other). Robyn

P.S. You say your parents didn't evacuate for Andrew. Where exactly did they live then?
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,929,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Robyn, I think you are correct when you speak of people being hurricane ignorant in Florida.

I grew up on the coast of South Carolina and have been evacuated more times than I can remember. Hurricane Hugo did horrible damage to my beach house (it actually had another home on top of it), and my family's vacation home in Murrells Inlet.

That said, Floyd did and extreme amount of damage all the way up the east coast to the tune of almost 5 billion dollars and 57 deaths.

I will stay for no hurricane and people that decide to try and ride one out are stupid.
I found Hugo an exceptional storm even though I was never close to the coastal damage area for years after that storm hit. Thousands of trees knocked down on I-95 (well inland).

We were very lucky with Floyd where I lived. A mandatory evacuation. Some flooding (up to the top step of our porches judging from the "leaf lines" when we got back and trees down. But that's about it.

One thing we learned from Hurricane Floyd in terms of NE Florida was the concept of turning I-10 into a totally one way highway out if anything like Floyd happens again in the future (I-10 going in both ways during the evacuation was a real mess). Something similar happened during the Andrew evacuation. They were still collecting tolls on the Florida Turnpike until late in the afternoon the day before - and traffic was backed up for miles and miles. Until Governor Chiles told the toll booth people to stop collecting the friggin' tolls. Robyn

Last edited by Robyn55; 07-02-2014 at 04:18 PM..
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