U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-02-2014, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,763,062 times
Reputation: 47257

Advertisements

Regarding those to stay to guard their possessions. Do they think their possessions are more important than their lives?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-02-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
I'm guessing your parent' home was not directly nailed by Andrew. That's the only reason I can think of that would explain your naiveté. My son's wife and in-laws were not so fortunate. I can't remember all of the grisly details but I do remember they eventually sought refuge in their Range Rover that was parked in the garage. (The Rover made it through, not the garage). Of course, they didn't start out there - actually experiencing the house implode caused them to take desperate measures.

They fled Miami soon thereafter and built a new home near Jacksonville. Eventually they moved to the Upper Valley in NH. Hard winters? You betcha. But I will guarantee you they would laugh their a**** off at this comment: "[s]eriously, the hard winters are more difficult that a 'cane."
Just to put what you say in context. People on the coast (like me and my husband) were ordered evacuated for Andrew. But most people inland weren't. Because - at the time - and remember - this is only 22 years ago - we didn't know that very intense storms (which Andrew was) could cause tons of damage 10-15-20 miles inland (which Andrew did).

Bryan Norcross - a local weatherman (now famous) - is given lots of earned credit for helping to save the lives of many people inland who were caught unawares by this terrifying storm by giving them advice on the radio in the middle of the night. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 04:05 PM
 
649 posts, read 554,159 times
Reputation: 1877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I found Hugo an exceptional storm even though I was never close to the coastal damage area for years after that storm hit. Thousands of trees knocked down on I-95 (well inland).
Hugo knocked down trees and other weak structures as far inland as Columbia, SC and Charlotte, NC.

Not to mention the inland flooding associated with all of the rain, so as others have said, hurricanes don't just affect those living 2 miles from the ocean, they can affect communities hundreds of miles inland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 04:08 PM
 
649 posts, read 554,159 times
Reputation: 1877
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Regarding those to stay to guard their possessions. Do they think their possessions are more important than their lives?
Some do. Most likely it's a combination of things. Most that stay either don't have the means to leave, they have such limited resources that what they do have is everything to them, they believe that it can't/won't happen to them, or they are billy badasses that can withstand anything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 04:16 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14260
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
Hurricane Irene was mostly a non-event for NYC and LI but did major damage upstate. She was the 7th costliest on record. Here's a link to damage by region; NYS had 10 deaths, but if it doesn't happen in the metro area, it isn't news. There's a bridge here that was washed out by Irene and won't be finished with repairs until 2015, the flooding was incredible. It was much worse north of here.

We live on a hilly street, no flooding, but water in the basement if the ground can't absorb torrential rains, so two sump pumps with one on battery backup. Our pantry is always well stocked. We have a generator and every flashlight known to man. We learned early on, you are on your own for a while in a disaster.

Unfortunately, that always seems to be what happens with catastrophic weather events and the news media. The media picks out what they believe to be the epicenter of the storm, and concentrate the publicity there. As far as they're concerned, no matter what other areas were affected by a given storm, or how widespread the damage may be, as far as the news media is concerned, nothing happened anywhere except their designated area. So if you aren't in the zip code where the news media says there was a storm, you didn't have a storm!

And it isn't necessarily the area where the worst damage occurred either. According to the news media, New Orleans was the only place affected by Hurricane Katrina ( the worst storm in history, doncha know, that is, until "Superstorm Sandy" bumped Katrina out of this category), and HUrricane Andrew hit Homestead, Florida. Nowhere else. That, as I understand it, was thanks to the publicity firm hired by the then-mayor of Homestead the day or so after Andrew, to get the news out of the damage to Homestead so they'd get maximum coverage.

But all that said, we know we're all vulnerable and should be prepared for any eventuality. Sounds like you are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I think that's true in other places too. After Andrew - the media took a look at downtown Miami. It was ok - so the media moved on (to Louisiana IIRC). And completely missed the story of the devastation to the south of downtown. And there wasn't a lot of media coverage of all the storms Florida had in 2004-05. Perhaps because none hit a major city. I sometimes think that the media doesn't cover storms enough if it can't find nearby places to stay with lots of hotels/restaurants. Robyn
Actually, the media concentrated on Homestead for post-Andrew damage. Far as they're concerned, Hurricane Andre hit Homestead, nowhere else. They had some brief coverage of Cutler Ridge and Country Walk at the time, but that was about it. The outcome of that was that any resources meant to help out hurricane victims- such as the National Guard, FEMA, and even insurance adjusters were sent to those areas and other areas that had just as much damage had to wait or didn't get the help at all.

We didn't even see Adjuster #1 from State Farm until almost the end of October.... they were busy handing out generous checks to folks in Homestead and Country Walk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Orlando
1,986 posts, read 2,635,623 times
Reputation: 7548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Bryan Norcross - a local weatherman (now famous) - is given lots of earned credit for helping to save the lives of many people inland who were caught unawares by this terrifying storm by giving them advice on the radio in the middle of the night. Robyn
Bryan Norcross is my hero. He was with me all night long during Andrew. Via radio of course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 05:01 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14260
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG120 View Post
You are right and this is a very real danger. I bolded the last part because this is a major challenge.

The media does hype these events because it drives ratings which improves the bottom line. Much like when they figured out how to make money off the news, it was no longer objective.

Jim Cantore standing on the beach screaming about whatever he screams about does us no good.

Use of the media is a very delicate balancing act. How much is too much and how much is not enough?

And to Robyn55's question, I am an emergency manager.
Exactly. When I'm following the path of a storm that could potentially affect the area we live in, besides looking at the NHC site and Weather Underground sites to keep track of the location, strength, and tracking models, I prefer looking at local forecasts rather than the Weather Channel to get any additional information. IMO local weather forecasters provide better perspective as to possible effects of an approaching form in a given area, and it seems to me that they're less dramatic about it. In fact, when we lived in Miami, I appreciated the efforts of our local forecasters there to assuage the nervousness that the residents there who'd gone through Hurricane Andrew felt some years later when another tropical system was making its way towards the US east coast. They didn't downplay any potential effect a storm might have, but they pointed out mitigating conditions that might turn the storm away, weaken it, or presented alternative scenarios to consider and act on if needed.

I gave up looking at the Weather Channel for any hurricane information. Weather is entertainment to them, and they hype everything to achieve the most dramatic effect they can- makes for ratings, I guess. In doing so, IMO, they provide NO helpful information. While I realize it's important not to downplay any potential danger from a tropical system ( or any natural disaster), I find those reporters in coordinated color raincoats standing on a beach in a blowing wind emoting about how awful it is just annoying, not helpful. And their use of what I'd consider hyperbole when they talked of any tropical system- as in (name) "churning" or "barrelling" across the Atlantic, "headed for the US coast"- or "slamming into ( the point of impact) even when it's not a major storm....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 05:08 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14260
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
I spent the night that Andrew came to town in my bedroom closet -- it was the only room in the house that had no windows. I still remember the sound of debris being blown against the exterior walls of the house -- loud crashing thumps, over and over again. It was only luck that stopped any of that debris from coming through the windows, because we had no hurricane protection on the windows. We lived about 15 miles from the ocean, so evacuating was never a question.

The six weeks after Andrew were even worse than the storm itself. No electricity means no A/C, and it was so hot. It also means no traffic lights, and with the stop signs and street signs blown away, people were hurt or even killed in car crashes and emergency services had a hard time trying to find them. There were looters, and people threatening to shoot each other over a bag of ice.

Now I live in central FL, in a suburb of Orlando, over an hour's drive to the ocean, but I still take precautions in hurricane season. I keep my storm supplies stocked up, so hopefully after the next hurricane (and there always is a "next hurricane") I won't have to leave the house until power and some semblance of order is restored. The back of my house has very large windows that face a lake, and next week I'm having accordion shutters installed on those windows. I don't want to have to sit through another hurricane hoping that nothing shatters the windows -- I'm figuring I was warned by Andrew.

Oh, and anyone who lives in a mobile home ANYWHERE in Florida needs to evacuate before the storm hits. Not just near the coast.

Depending on your location during HUrricane Andrew, shutters over your windows wouldn't necessarily have prevented anything from going through them. We had shutters over our windows, and had a beam from our neighbor's roof come right through the metal shutters over the window- left a hole about a foot in diameter in that shutter, which was smashed against what was left of the window. That let the wind get in the house- took out the window next to the first one- the shutter, window and frame all gone- as was the roof- trusses included.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2014, 05:31 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14260
I wanted to mention that I just visited the National Hurricane Center site, and see they have their new feature- predicted or possible storm surge flooding effects, and US rainfall amount graphics added to the tracking information for every storm. They currently have it posted for Arthur.

That could be great information!

National Hurricane Center
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top