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Old 07-07-2014, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
No, you are incorrect...
Read back to your earlier message - and it sounds like an odd case to me. Still - there are always outliers when it comes to medical stuff. Malpractice as well. I wouldn't even venture a guess when it comes to your friend (about whom I know nothing). When it comes to cancer "here" (like in the colon) - it may be the result of an aggressive metastatic tumor "there". Colon cancers tend to be slow growing - but I honestly don't know enough to say they always are - especially if they've metastasized from elsewhere.

Just sad that you lost a friend. Robyn
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Old 07-07-2014, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Opt for a virtual colonoscopy if there are concerns about having a regular one.

My colon is adhered to my abdominal wall and there is no way I am going to have a regular colonoscopy and no way a doc would even want to perform one on me.

So just opt for a virtual procedure.

Most of these procedures are unnecessary and just revenue generators. The includes mammograms. (new report out on that topic, btw).

People DO have symptoms related to colon cancer; we just haven't been taught exactly what to look for and when to consider changes in bowel habits (for example) as something serious. Most of what is removed (polyps) are deemed "precancerous" - so that makes patients feel they have "dodged a bullet" but in reality, most polyps are not a precursor to cancer.
IIRC - Medicare won't reimburse for virtual colonoscopy as a routine matter (it might perhaps if there are extenuating circumstances).


UCSF Radiology: Why Virtual Colonoscopy Coverage is Denied by Medicare - YouTube

Could be wrong. But - in any event - unless I had a specific medical issue that made virtual colonoscopy preferable to regular - I'd go with regular. Because - during regular - any polyps and similar can be removed during the original procedure. With virtual - you just have to have the procedure twice if the first finds anything.

I do think genetics plays a role in all of this. My husband and I both have family histories of colon cancer. YMMV.

And - although there are usually signs of colon cancer - like dark red blood in stools - they're not signs of early disease - but later ones. And who sits over a toilet bowl every day looking for this stuff? Not me. What most of us older people are likely to observe in our toilets is bright red blood - usually a sign of hemorrhoids - not colon cancer.

And why is there any big deal about mammography? Especially since we on Medicare don't have to pay a nickel out of pocket for it. I've been on HRT for about 30 years now. And it's definitely recommended for me. For most women my age as well. And there's like zero risk at all. So why not? Robyn
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Old 07-07-2014, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paka View Post
Even though I still have some nasty habits - I get my regular colonoscopy (now every 3 years because I seem to have inherited some of my parents' tendencies to grow not such nice stuff in my colon). Robyn
Quote:
About the ONLY thing we have no control over (lifestyle habits) is the "gene pool" we are required to swim in....you are SMART to get your regular reviews, colon cancer is one of the MOST TREATABLE if caught in time!!! Playing "ostrich" and sticking your head in the sand ignoring is NOT a great idea!
Agree 100%. My mother died of colon cancer. One of my husband's grandfathers died of colon cancer. It is such a slow growing/easily caught early/possible to treat cancer that there's no reason in the whole world not to get screening colonoscopies.

Also - technology has advanced a whole lot since my husband had his first colonoscopy about 30 years ago. The equipment today - fiberoptic - is a a whole lot better (more flexible). We both like the versed/valium twilight sleep as opposed to other anesthesia options. Because we're retired - and don't mind being spacey one day every 3 or 5 years . For people who have to get back to work fast - there are better anesthesia options. Robyn
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Old 07-07-2014, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paka View Post
Well....that might be YOUR experience, but as a nurse I have done Flex-Sigmoidoscopies on folks that were in LOTS of pain for the air used to expand the colon thru the twists and turns, so please don't think you are the norm...it is VERY apparent YOU are SPECIAL!
I had a flex sig a really long time ago - and found it much more painful than a colonoscopy. Perhaps because of the anesthesia I had for it (or - more correctly - didn't have).

I'm not sure why anyone today would have a flex sig as opposed to a colonoscopy. Any thoughts? Robyn
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,007,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I had a flex sig a really long time ago - and found it much more painful than a colonoscopy. Perhaps because of the anesthesia I had for it (or - more correctly - didn't have).

I'm not sure why anyone today would have a flex sig as opposed to a colonoscopy. Any thoughts? Robyn
Yes, I think a new thread should be started on this. I've completely forgotten what this thread is supposed to be about.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:45 AM
 
13,346 posts, read 25,607,620 times
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Apparently, if you have my family's genetics, you are either crazy and Christian and grow very old or you're nice and Jewish and get cancer. I'm atheist, so we'll see.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:56 AM
 
Location: in the miseries
3,302 posts, read 3,586,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Yes, I think a new thread should be started on this. I've completely forgotten what this thread is supposed to be about.
This thread is about poor decisions affecting quality of life in retirement.
And yes lack of a colonoscopy could be a bad decision.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:00 AM
 
13,346 posts, read 25,607,620 times
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I just talked to my last real relative, my 89-year-old aunt, who is in fragile but reasonable health in her own home. She says she regrets having chosen not to be part of the Soc. Sec. system when working for the state. Now, recently widowed, she is appreciating the loss of that income, being retired now for 30 years. She had an option apparently while working to turn over about $7k in past deductions and then be part of Soc. Security, and she declined. She also gave me a lot of support for the working I'm doing now with the idea that, in later years, I might wish I had worked more when it was available. (I am three years and nine months away from my pension, and every shift that I work increases that pension. I am hardly overworking for a normal adult- up to 40 hours a week, sometimes 48) but it is wearing me down with the shift work. I must remember that now is the time to do it, not later to regret not doing it).
Oh, and she's Christian and had colon cancer 20 years ago. I guess she's a mixture of my genetics.

When I visit in the fall, I'm taking her to look at some assisted livings/independent senior livings. It's very frustrating that she wants to hang onto her savings for her two sons rather than dip into them for housing that I think would suit her very well. Her one son will buy used BMWs, and the other will buy guitars.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:23 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,235,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post

And why is there any big deal about mammography? Especially since we on Medicare don't have to pay a nickel out of pocket for it. I've been on HRT for about 30 years now. And it's definitely recommended for me. For most women my age as well. And there's like zero risk at all. So why not? Robyn
Latest info, already suspected by many clinicians:

Study shows annual mammograms don't save lives - CBS News

Largest Study on Mammograms Again Finds No Benefit

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/he...ncer.html?_r=0

Ultrasound Helps Breast Cancer Detection

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance | Ultrasound Is Better Detecting Cancer in Women Under 40

Study: Adding MRIs and Ultrasounds to Mammograms May Catch More Cancers | TIME.com

It has long been known that about 40% of mammograms end up producing false positives.

Also, in re: to Medicare coverage of diagnostics in general, again, folks are NOT advocating for their health if they rely on what Medicare will and will not cover. Sometimes, paying out of pocket to get the diagnostic test needed, in a timely manner, would be the better course, even if that means creating a financial hardship. Now, that is my opinion and it is based on 25 years of research, as a writer, on the subject.
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,956,950 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Yes, I think a new thread should be started on this. I've completely forgotten what this thread is supposed to be about.
There's actually a thread here about colonoscopy that I started a while back:

Colonoscopy. Yuck - But.....

As for what *this* thread is about - look at the title. It could be just about anything IMO. Unless "bad" is limited to things like robbing a bank .

My mother never had colonoscopy - and she died a hideous death as a result post-retirement. That's pretty bad in my book. Robyn
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