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Old 07-04-2014, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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I've read this book and plan to reread it this summer. I find the approach of "moderation" seems the most sane. There's no "diet" or supplements or exercise regimen, just common sense but most important, a sense of community and belonging to that community.

Can 'Blue Zones' Help Turn Back the Biological Clock? : NPR

Here's Buettner's TedMed talk:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=4owTPhCs2ZE

I think I've concentrated way too much on diet and exercise and not enough on a strong sense of community and fitting into it. I'm going to try to focus more on that, because I feel deficient in that area of wellbeing and health.

Last edited by RiverBird; 07-04-2014 at 09:01 PM..
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Old 07-04-2014, 09:45 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,657 posts, read 40,029,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I've read this book and plan to reread it this summer. I find the approach of "moderation" seems the most sane. There's no "diet" or supplements or exercise regimen, just common sense but most important, a sense of community and belonging to that community.

Can 'Blue Zones' Help Turn Back the Biological Clock? : NPR
...
""Okinawa, Japan, has the longest disability-free life expectancy. In Loma Linda, Calif., a community of Seventh Day Adventists has a life expectancy that's nine to 11 years greater than that of other Americans. ""

And adds to the USDA research in the 1980's that was finding "seniors living in rural Senior Housing Co-ops, lived "independently" 10 yrs longer than their peers in private homes and apartments. "

Sense of community & active engagement in your choices, are a good thing for most people.

Senior Cooperative Housing - Presentation to President's Commission
Rural Cooperative Housing for Older Adults: An Emerging Challenge for Extension Educators
CHAPTER 5 - SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS
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Old 07-04-2014, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
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I agree that having a purpose and being part of a community are potentially beneficial attributes for positive longevity. That is why I make it a point to have a continuing volunteer activity that gets me associated with others over a long period of time and involves doing things that have a tangible benefit to the community.
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Old 07-04-2014, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,759,876 times
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Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
I agree that having a purpose and being part of a community are potentially beneficial attributes for positive longevity. That is why I make it a point to have a continuing volunteer activity that gets me associated with others over a long period of time and involves doing things that have a tangible benefit to the community.
Good post, NewToCA. In the excellent book Younger Next Year, the authors (Crowley and Lodge) emphasize having meaningful social connections, which is another way of saying being part of a community. Volunteer work is certainly one way of accomplishing that.

To the OP: Diet and exercise remain very important. Please do not neglect those two factors as you seek to increase your community involvement. I see the key to continued vitality and good health and functioning as being a three-legged stool: Diet, exercise, and meaningful activities/social connections/community involvement. (The last three being essentially the same thing).
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Old 07-05-2014, 04:17 AM
 
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A big point in why we got mom into a senior independent apartment community (700 seniors) was the community and events. Except for the complaining they all do, it has had a wonderful positive effect on her health and mental welfare.

When she has a birthday or when her brother died, she got lots of cards and visits. Many stop and talk to her while she is on her patio since she has chairs and a patio umbrella. They have building meetings where she finds out who is moving out and moving in.

It was a good thing. Otherwise, I think she would have just sat in her apartment or house and faded away.
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Old 07-05-2014, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
I agree that having a purpose and being part of a community are potentially beneficial attributes for positive longevity. That is why I make it a point to have a continuing volunteer activity that gets me associated with others over a long period of time and involves doing things that have a tangible benefit to the community.
I think this whole aspect is ignored or at best underplayed in our overall health and well-being. The emphasis is always on diet, supplements, exercise (all a me-centered thing). Many seniors are living loner lives with few connections. It's one of the big reasons I'm reluctant to move away. Reconstructing friendships and maintaining family ties (for better or worse ) is all so much harder in far from "home" locations as we age. I have some friends my age who have a tight circle of friends since grade school! I can't match that.
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Old 07-05-2014, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,997,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetana3 View Post
A big point in why we got mom into a senior independent apartment community (700 seniors) was the community and events. Except for the complaining they all do, it has had a wonderful positive effect on her health and mental welfare.

When she has a birthday or when her brother died, she got lots of cards and visits. Many stop and talk to her while she is on her patio since she has chairs and a patio umbrella. They have building meetings where she finds out who is moving out and moving in.

It was a good thing. Otherwise, I think she would have just sat in her apartment or house and faded away.
I believe you.
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Old 07-05-2014, 02:07 PM
 
Location: in the miseries
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Community is a big part of aging gracefully.
IMO
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Old 07-05-2014, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,997,544 times
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I agree that diet and activity play a big part too. I have "heart" on both parental sides and all grandparents so vascular/heart is my particular thing as well. I would be foolish to ignore diet and the need for aerobic activity. Since I cannot do impact exercise, I've found a good combination of mini-trampoline (with hand weights) and stretching (yoga). What's still not so strong in my "triangle" is community involvement.
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Old 08-07-2015, 05:03 AM
 
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i am senior and retired. I decided to relocate from my lifelong home and move to North Carolina for a test run. I made this plan up 5 years ago and implemented it 1 year ago. I am starting to feel a little at "loose ends" now that everything is "decorated", merchant familiarization is solved and so on. Does anyone have suggestions for establishing a "new life" socially after age 70. Somewhere I heard that bingo is a good start. Any comments on that? I am also considering trying to get a job. I have some health issues, but; I feel good and all my numbers are good and I still walk to get groceries.
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