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Old 07-11-2014, 04:32 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,232,688 times
Reputation: 14870

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
I wasn't suggesting that she move to TN, as I mentioned earlier that it was somewhat humid. I was replying to the post that stated CA did NOT have high taxes, and merely used TN taxes as an example to rebut that.
As someone who grew up in The Dry Part, I can tell you that a lot of us have trouble breathing in what the people in The Wet Part call 'somewhat humid'. Humid to me is early morning fog in June that goes away by 8 AM

As for taxes in CA? I'm not a fan of the place (I'll get out of here sooner or later, LOL) - but - in the last 12 months I paid, as a percent of my gross ... 13.48% (Federal, State, and Property)

Everyone's situation is different.
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Old 07-11-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,098 posts, read 22,960,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
California property taxes are 4 times what they are in TN. Home prices are twice as high. California has numerous "fees" that in other states would be considered taxes. We register all 7 of our vehicles (2 drivers, 1 vintage car, 2 road MC and 2 off-road MC) for the price of my 2002 Honda CRV in CA. Our utilities are less than 1/2 of CA utilities. I wouldn't want to see someone move where they wouldn't like it either, but there are many places where you can live the same lifestyle as CA, or better, for less.

OP try looking at coastal properties or riverfront properties on the east coast, much more reasonable. Especially if you look at smaller towns not right near the cities.
Saying home prices are twice as high in CA as in TN is ...well, shall we discuss which city/county you are comparing? Are you comparing Chattanooga to San Francisco? How would Redding prices fit in there?

A home in Silicon Valley can be over a million dollars. In Redding, there's one listed for $175,000 (3 bdrm, 2 bath), or you could have one with a pool for $232,900 (4 bdrm, 3 bath).

Again, the perception that the entire state of California is priced according to SF prices, is incorrect.

The Bay Area is a bunch of cities and counties that all meld together. Population of that area is about 7 million people.

The city of San Francisco alone has about 800,000 people. San Jose has 945,000.

The city of Redding has about 90,000. Shasta County has about 178,000 total.

I'm glad you like Tennessee. I actually lived there for about 5 years and have some fond memories, except the humidity lol! I do miss the fireflies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
As someone who grew up in The Dry Part, I can tell you that a lot of us have trouble breathing in what the people in The Wet Part call 'somewhat humid'. Humid to me is early morning fog in June that goes away by 8 AM

As for taxes in CA? I'm not a fan of the place (I'll get out of here sooner or later, LOL) - but - in the last 12 months I paid, as a percent of my gross ... 13.48% (Federal, State, and Property)

Everyone's situation is different.
Exactly. People should do the actual math, before believing the wild rumors about the cost of living anywhere.
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Old 07-11-2014, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
... A home in Silicon Valley can be over a million dollars. In Redding, there's one listed for $175,000 (3 bdrm, 2 bath), or you could have one with a pool for $232,900 (4 bdrm, 3 bath).
That is what I remember.

Around here it is primarily homes in the tourist hotspots that are high like that. Along the coast, or around some of the the heavily marketed lakes. Everywhere else home prices are much more reasonable.
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,783 posts, read 4,838,667 times
Reputation: 19458
You're right NoMoreSnow, prices vary wildly in CA. I was just making a general statement that for similar homes, similarly situated, CA homes are approximately twice the price. Say a nice suburban home within commute distance of Sacramento, versus a nice suburban home of the same sq ftg within commute distance of Knoxville, Nashville, or Chatanooga. Obviously there are exceptions and I'm sure we could find examples to support both positions. I lived in Northern CA my whole life (50+ years) except for my military years and the last 12 months. I've bought several homes there and in fact still own a rental property there. I don't think I'm perpetuating a stereotype or a wild rumor if I am just stating a fact that I know very well.
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Old 07-12-2014, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,660 posts, read 1,525,009 times
Reputation: 3640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post

As for taxes in CA? I'm not a fan of the place (I'll get out of here sooner or later, LOL) - but - in the last 12 months I paid, as a percent of my gross ... 13.48% (Federal, State, and Property)
That's impressively low, especially for a single person. I'm paying about 25% while working and it will be the same in retirement (not much tax relief on a pension and regular 401K but I feel fortunate to have the pension).
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Old 07-12-2014, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,783 posts, read 4,838,667 times
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CA does tax pensions. Many states don't.
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Old 07-12-2014, 02:45 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,232,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
That's impressively low, especially for a single person. I'm paying about 25% while working and it will be the same in retirement (not much tax relief on a pension and regular 401K but I feel fortunate to have the pension).
So do I!
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
CA does tax pensions. Many states don't.
12 states - 24% of the 50 don't.
Alabama
Alaska
Florida
Misissippi
Nevada
New Hampshire
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Washington
Wyoming

So back to the OP - looks like Washington or Wyoming fits their bill, if they have a pension.
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Old 07-12-2014, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
You're right NoMoreSnow, prices vary wildly in CA. I was just making a general statement that for similar homes, similarly situated, CA homes are approximately twice the price. ...
As a native Californian, who has owned homes in California, I agree 100%

I retired elsewhere.



Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
That's impressively low, especially for a single person. I'm paying about 25% while working and it will be the same in retirement (not much tax relief on a pension and regular 401K but I feel fortunate to have the pension).
I retired to a state that has income taxes, and my pension is fully taxable. But yet I pay no income taxes, because my AGI is less then the 'Standard Deduction' and 'Personal Exemption'. Which leaves my pension un-taxed.

My Federal, State, and Property taxes; amount to about 43% of one month's pension. Or 4% of my annual gross income.

New 2400 sq ft home on 150 acres with 1/4 mile of river frontage.

We look at this from different view points. To me, 13.48% of gross is crazy high.

Have a good day.



Just because a state taxes pensions, does not mean that pensioners will be paying income taxes in such states.
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:59 PM
 
307 posts, read 473,284 times
Reputation: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by slsl6 View Post
I'm looking for a place to settle in in a year or so, but everywhere I look it seems that residents complain about high real estate prices, high taxes, crime, drug problems, etc. This is probably because I'm trying to find a more reasonably-priced area with, say, well-maintained condos or town homes under 200K.

Here are my specific requirements: I love fall and winter, hate spring and summer (I especially hate heat and humidity, so places like Florida or the South are out and the desert is just too hot--I need four seasons, anyway), but consistent winter temperatures below zero, as in the upper Midwest or the Dakotas are off my list; I'm not a big city lover (I would choose the suburbs of a large city); wind is fine, but too much rain is not (I've heard that the rain in Oregon and Washington is more of a mist than a consistent downpour, which I think is O.K. (cloudy days on end don't bother me); I would love to live on a seacoast but it's just too unaffordable; I like artsy areas (Mendocino would be great, for example, but it's too pricey for what you get and ditto for Flagstaff/Sedona, for example); good hospitals; locals who welcome newcomers; low property taxes, etc.

I'm wondering about: Vancouver, WA; Bangor, ME (I've read about drug problems, crime, and unfriendly locals); Burlington, VT (I think it might be unaffordable); Bloomington, IN; Reno, NV area.

Anywhere else? General input would be much appreciated!
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Check out Bellingham, WA. On the bay or near it, fairly mild winters (last winter we hardly got a couple of inches)...comfortable summers. I don't recall ever being locked in due to bad weather. Medium...probably rated as a small city. Lots of green around...pine forests and plenty of produce farms around. I-5 runs right through town...which can take you from the Canadian border all the way to the Mexican border (San Diego, CA). Has everything you'd want and need for a small town....or city. Has a good well staffed and equipped hospital and lots of specialty clinics all over. Seems to be quite friendly. Haven't met a grumpy person yet (not like where we're temporarily staying at in Florida). Yes, of course...rain. More like drizzle...or if you want to call it "heavy" mist. Lots of it...but when the sun shines...everything brightens up...makes it worth all the rain that falls there. I suppose that's why the entire region is simply super green! You've the got the bay...beautiful sunsets...look the opposite way and you see majestic Mt. Baker whose peaks remain snow covered even in July. Across the bay you can see several islands...one of them Vancouver Island...which belongs to Canada. We lived in a small town just north of Bellingham...town of Blaine, right on the Canadian border. Very little traffic, no parking meters...and there is nowhere in town you'd have to pay to park. I think there's only one set of traffic lights in town. July 4th is the big event in Blaine. Old fashioned July 4th parade and lots of merrymaking...and fireworks on Birch Bay...which is considered part of Blaine. We own a home in Blaine...short walk from Birch Bay...a favorite tourist hangout in the summer. There is a water slide park in Birch Bay. All the big shops are in Bellingham. It is shorter to drive to Vancouver, BC than it is to Seattle. We're heading back the end of this summer.
Lots of other small towns around that area. Best is to make a trip there...stay a few days and get to know the area.
Bellingham has a small international airport. It has direct flights to Hawaii, Las Vegas, Vancouver, BC. Of course it has flights to major hubs like SEATAC and PDX (Portland, OR).
Vancouver, WA is not a bad place to consider. I've been researching Vancouver for sometime now. I like it there...lots of activities, great summer seasons...mild winters. Rains, yes. I don't think it's as much as it does in the PNW (Pacific NorthWest). Job-wise...might be better in Vancouver. Don't expect a lot of great jobs in Bellingham. But if you don't have to rely on a job any place is good. Cost of living? It is shockingly expensive anywhere nowadays. We hopped around the country looking for affordable...and pleasant place to retire. We liked Bellingham area...so we stayed. Sure it's expensive. It's also expensive here where we are now...in Florida. We also stopped a couple of months in Prescott, AZ...and checked out Flagstaff, Sedona, etc. No different from WA state. We have lived in WA over five years already...and we're managing comfortably on just my retirement pension. There are cheaper places to live in the country...question is, are you willing to give up the quality of life you want to have?
Before I forget...here are positive points about living in Vancouver, WA. WA state has no income tax. And just a few minutes away...just across the Columbia River from Vancouver..is Portland, OR. And Oregon has no sales tax. While you don't pay State income tax in WA....you do all your major shopping across the state line in Oregon...and pay no sales tax. Best of both worlds. And you're a short drive to a major airport hub...;PDX. I-5 also runs through Vancouver...for that quick get away to anywhere. Good luck on your search.

Last edited by FCStraight; 07-12-2014 at 07:06 PM.. Reason: Added a line.
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Old 07-13-2014, 01:03 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,181 posts, read 2,856,933 times
Reputation: 4876
A few words about Wyoming:

Wind, Wind, Wind, Wind, and more Wind.

I have a coworker who grew up in the very same town as Dick Cheney... and when she retired I asked if she were going back. OH HELL NO was her response. The small-town small minded "libertarianism" and "rugged individualism" were just nice words for arrogance and people who really don't like living with anyone around them telling them what to do. Those were her words not mine.

The winters there also were miserable.

California is do-able. I was once a Californian - and we plan to go back. There is no sticker shock. We know what we're up against. And we know better than to live smack-dab in the middle of the large urban centers.

Reno is an ashtray. You'd do better by living in the Carson Valley - far from the casinos.

Lake Tahoe is also one of my happy places as well - but only to visit - not to live there.
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