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Old 07-14-2014, 07:39 AM
 
6,822 posts, read 5,151,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
This is not a place to proselytize...
The man gave his opinion. It was on topic. This is the place to do that. Or are all opinions valid unless they mention God?
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:00 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
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Very interesting thread. Thank you for posting it, TUBORG.

I see the future, in re: to healthcare, as being very different than it is today. The pendulum is necessarily swinging back to pre-Hill/Burton days . . .

I envision a new type of "warehousing" necessarily evolving.

Gone will be the private rooms in hospitals (except for the very wealthy). Hospitals will be designed to accommodate patients in a "ward" setting, with 10 beds or so in a room. Same for nursing homes. Oh yeah, it will be called something else . . . and it may be that there will be some accommodation for privacy - more like "cubbies" we are used to in office settings. But all the upscale accoutrements, private care, staffing requirements - those things will change. They are already changing.

Docs will no longer be able to demand high salaries.

Medical education (how it is conducted; how physicians are licensed) will have to change, along with the cost of medical education.

There simply is not going to be enough money to continue to underwrite nursing home care as we know it now.

Gen Xers already have so much resentment towards their parents' generation . . . they will have no problem passing legislation to warehouse folks in nursing home settings.

There will be much more strict guidelines for Medicare and the delivery of service. For example, if a person is over 75, he/she won't get that knee replacement underwritten. Get a cane. Or a walker. Or a wheelchair.

Things will change and the changes are already happening. By 2030, things will have begun evolving into something similar to what I have outlined. By 2040, if you are alive, you will think of the year 2000 as having been "the good ole days" in regard to the delivery of healthcare in this country.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:07 AM
 
29,779 posts, read 34,867,277 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikelee81 View Post
The man gave his opinion. It was on topic. This is the place to do that. Or are all opinions valid unless they mention God?
As the OP of this thread I will weigh in on the appropriateness of faith and God in responding to my OP. It is for many of us faith and a belief in guidance beyond the conventions of many others that helps us chart the unknowns of life. Transplanting was a great unknown as we moved down that path. It was prayer and faith that gave us comfort in moving forward. It is now prayers of thank you for having giving us the life we have. For many of us our Faith is one of the few things WE believe we do know. I will leave it at that but that poster was ok in my book and I had anticipated others would have suggested what they did.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,217,509 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Very interesting thread. Thank you for posting it, TUBORG.

I see the future, in re: to healthcare, as being very different than it is today. The pendulum is necessarily swinging back to pre-Hill/Burton days . . .

I envision a new type of "warehousing" necessarily evolving.

Gone will be the private rooms in hospitals (except for the very wealthy). Hospitals will be designed to accommodate patients in a "ward" setting, with 10 beds or so in a room. Same for nursing homes. Oh yeah, it will be called something else . . . and it may be that there will be some accommodation for privacy - more like "cubbies" we are used to in office settings. But all the upscale accoutrements, private care, staffing requirements - those things will change. They are already changing.

Docs will no longer be able to demand high salaries.

Medical education (how it is conducted; how physicians are licensed) will have to change, along with the cost of medical education.

There simply is not going to be enough money to continue to underwrite nursing home care as we know it now.

Gen Xers already have so much resentment towards their parents' generation . . . they will have no problem passing legislation to warehouse folks in nursing home settings.

There will be much more strict guidelines for Medicare and the delivery of service. For example, if a person is over 75, he/she won't get that knee replacement underwritten. Get a cane. Or a walker. Or a wheelchair.

Things will change and the changes are already happening. By 2030, things will have begun evolving into something similar to what I have outlined. By 2040, if you are alive, you will think of the year 2000 as having been "the good ole days" in regard to the delivery of healthcare in this country.
The current push is for states to alleviate costs by providing home care assistance in lieu of care in facilities. I would expect the warehousing of folks needing care would prove too expensive - one needs to do no more than look at the expense of providing similar care to those elderly currently housed in the state mental health facilities. It ain't cheap.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:37 AM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,224,402 times
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Quote:
Now with greater reliance on investments in the absence of pensions, retiree's will have to construct their own delivery system absent management by them. The more affluent are doing that it is the masses that might be the concern.
With surveys showing that most people have hardly any money saved -- period, let alone put away for retirement....'concern' is an understatement. It's SCARY how LITTLE people have saved....couple that topic with the the issue on another thread -- the one about children possibly being force to pay for parents' care....and we could have "a perfect storm" coming. MUCH as I hate that phrase....it fits.

Having more is always having less, obviously. That's reason enough to save. But another reason to save more, is the likelihood that the government may want to TAKE half of what we do manage to save.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:42 AM
 
29,779 posts, read 34,867,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
With surveys showing that most people have hardly any money saved -- period, let alone put away for retirement....'concern' is an understatement. It's SCARY how LITTLE people have saved....couple that topic with the the issue on another thread -- the one about children possibly being force to pay for parents' care....and we could have "a perfect storm" coming. MUCH as I hate that phrase....it fits.

Having more is always having less, obviously. That's reason enough to save. But another reason to save more, is the likelihood that the government may want to TAKE half of what we do manage to save.
What forum and thread is that? Millennials are saving at a greater rate and early than Boomers. I don't think they are going to take to kindly to politicians wanting to take their retirement money.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:49 AM
 
29,779 posts, read 34,867,277 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
With surveys showing that most people have hardly any money saved -- period, let alone put away for retirement....'concern' is an understatement. It's SCARY how LITTLE people have saved....couple that topic with the the issue on another thread -- the one about children possibly being force to pay for parents' care....and we could have "a perfect storm" coming. MUCH as I hate that phrase....it fits.

Having more is always having less, obviously. That's reason enough to save. But another reason to save more, is the likelihood that the government may want to TAKE half of what we do manage to save.
The situation at the border now and the debate of is it our responsibility to save them could have long term implications about how much responsibility we have and at what cost to save each other. Hmmm what constitutes each other? We now debate income/wealth redistribution across age groups, isn't the next logical debate within age groups? Should affluent seniors be expected to share the cost of their less able brethren? Will there be advocates for a shared retirement and health cost pot? What wifey? There already is? Gotta stop her from reading the ----Po--.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:52 AM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,224,402 times
Reputation: 3330
Excellent points, anifani. EXCELLENT points.

Whatever you think you'd like to save -- save DOUBLE. We'll need to...so the gov't can take half.....and WE'LL still have enough to do what we want for US.

Quote:
Things will change and the changes are already happening. By 2030, things will have begun evolving into something similar to what I have outlined. By 2040, if you are alive, you will think of the year 2000 as having been "the good ole days" in regard to the delivery of healthcare in this country.
At 54....those years are exactly when I'll be 70, 80, and up. Son of a b....

Quote:
What forum and thread is that?
The thread about adult children being forced to pay for parents' care is in the 'caregiving' board.

Quote:
We now debate income/wealth redistribution across age groups, isn't the next logical debate within age groups? Should affluent seniors be expected to share the cost of their less able brethren? Will there be advocates for a shared retirement and health cost pot?
FORCING people to pay for and take care of others breeds resentment. TAKING from a person who has saved what they've earned from the sweat of their brow and because of their own effort....to give to someone else, breeds resentment. Duh. That's what those things DO. So yeah, there's a pot boiling alright.....

Are those of us in our 50s screwed MORE than those of us in our 40s or 30s? I do know we're more screwed than my mom who's 88.

Last edited by rdflk; 07-14-2014 at 09:04 AM..
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:06 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
The current push is for states to alleviate costs by providing home care assistance in lieu of care in facilities. I would expect the warehousing of folks needing care would prove too expensive - one needs to do no more than look at the expense of providing similar care to those elderly currently housed in the state mental health facilities. It ain't cheap.
The reason it ain't cheap is because of regulations and the standards of care in place now.

Once the regs and standards of care change, the industry will respond to those changes. And vice versa. States will respond to the inability of nursing homes to provide care at the level the current regulations require for licensure.

I would add - yes - you are right as far as encouraging home care. The shift is to "generational" care and eventually, folks will have no choice but to "take in" their elder relatives (much as was done prior to WWII). The change will start with reimbursements to make it more feasible for inhome care and as those reimbursements change, families will have no choice but to PLAN for their parents' in home care, which will typically mean IN THE ADULT CHILDRENS' HOMES (or with a relative living in the parent's home).

The folks without families will be the ones warehoused.
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:20 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
Reputation: 22373
So . . . after writing about the dire situation with provision of healthcare for the elderly in the not so distant future . . . perhaps I should also mention that the wise will prepare for their senior years by planning with those changes in mind.

One thing folks can be doing NOW is to consider combining resources with their children and build or buy a home together that has living space and access appropriate for their parents as they age, especially if that senior has chronic health issues that will most likely mean limited mobility (or diminished brain function) in the future.
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