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Old 07-16-2014, 09:13 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,135,316 times
Reputation: 22373

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
I'm 54 and feel the way you do.

I've got an elderly mom, my job is high stress.
My life isn't about my work anymore, my priorities have changed.

I don't WANT to learn any new skills. I'm burned out and TIRED. I don't want to WORK. PERIOD.
No at this job, Not at a new job. I'm done. I'll have to coast at work until at least 62...8 more years.
People keep saying find something else, get new skills, find a new interest.... why do they keep pushing that, I know what I said. I don't want to work.
I know it makes no sense...but I sometimes WISH my company would lay us all of from my union covered job, so I could get 47 weeks of vacation pay and severance. I could take care of mom, leave this job I don't want to go to every day.

My job doesn't have sabbaticals. MAYBE that might reenergize me. But we don't have those.
SO I hate going to work everyday.

But as has been said we're blessed to have jobs...there are people who'd trade with us in a minute.
Doesn't help us any, but it can lead to spells of gratitude.....and attitude is part of it too.
Do you have vacation time? Spending months looking forward to a cruise, trip to Europe, RV trip across the country--whatever!--can be a great diversion. The planning alone can be very therapeutic.

Just a thought.
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,107 posts, read 8,145,682 times
Reputation: 18735
My opinion is, DO IT (retire, that is). I owned a trucking business, was in good shape at 60, and resolved that I'd work 2 more years at it. 2 years turned into 5...but those 5 were quite enjoyable, as I could see the light at the end of the tunnel, and realized that working for longer was MY decision. In the end, 2 years ago, I found a couple of young local guys who wanted to buy the business. I agreed to finance part of it in exchange for a small portion of the profits. The guys are doing great.

Life is too short to spend it waiting for time to pass by. That's time you'll never get back. 5 years ago, I'd have said that you needed to have your property paid for and owned outright, but some people won't get there till age 90. If need be, sell and downsize into something with a lower payment. Or if you have a lot of equity, refinance into a lower payment. Or sell, keep the cash, and find a low rental somewhere. I no longer think people should "wait" until they get their housing down to zero cost. But neither should they buy "up" into a higher payment.

Tomorrow isn't promised to any of us. Your father's advice was good for you 20 years ago; not so much now. I'm no fan of working oneself into the grave. The fact that you are experiencing these feelings of stress and lack of control (and that's what you're describing) indicates to me that your body and your mind are rebelling against the new demands being made on it. Virtually all jobs now have these "new" demands - computerization, new regs to follow, enforced compliance to policies that make no sense (and most of them don't)...it leads to burn-out. That's not a good place to go, for your body or your mind. Save your health at all costs.

Expect to adjust to a lower standard of living fairly quickly. This is not all bad, however. It costs a good deal of money to get out and work every day. Resolve to live within your means. I have never regretted my decision of 2 years ago. Very few retirees ever do.
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Mtns of Waynesville,NC & Nokomis, FL
4,240 posts, read 8,074,474 times
Reputation: 5291
All good anecdotal posts...I was burned out at 52, in 2000: 150+ nights on the road for nearly 3 decades, running a $200 mil+ biz, reporting to a new CEO that could not have cared less about the industry I had been in for 3 decades, and on and on.

I gave my 3 month contractual notice, hung around until they got tired of me and walked out the freaking door, and never looked back.

Only 52, but we had saved like squirrels, had no mort or debt, and I just didn't care anymore.

12 yrs later, I have no regrets...

If one can afford to bail, and has enough interests, hobbies, a few good friends, loving/supportive spouse, et al, I highly rec'd it.

And, if one gets bored, there are dozens of good charitable/volunteer situs in any little town in the US, that one can give some time and skill to.

Everyone's situ is different, but other than the big income/perks and some very interesting places I got to in my biz travel, a few good friends, and that ol'power/work deal that consumes many of us, I made the right choice, for me.
GL, mD
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:38 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,063 posts, read 9,520,860 times
Reputation: 5789
Yeah, I'm early sixties, and I like my work. But even so, I feel "done" with it.

Can you cut back on the hours you work without losing benefits, so that you'll have some time to indulge yourself?
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:03 AM
 
Location: california
5,656 posts, read 4,875,766 times
Reputation: 6681
Since I was a kid working with my dad doing construction, I have had so many different jobs thought the years, all demanding a lot of heavy physical effort, harsh weather, dangerous environments, and so on.
None of them paid very well, but they paid the bills an got me by.
For my last job, I asks the Lord for a job that I didn't have to go through all that any more my body had take it's tole ,and He provided me a job working of a manufacturer with great benefits and a future.
I had that job till they were laying off volumes of people and I was so close to retirement that every thing fell into place better than I could have engineered it. The severance pay took me to my retirement age and now At almost 64 I'm very glad the way things went.
King David was a smart man. Proverbs 3;
"Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not unto thine own understanding, and in all thy ways acknowledge Him, and He will direct thy path."
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:21 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,463,318 times
Reputation: 29071
Strange as it may sound, I thoroughly enjoyed my last career which was in the political field. As a political and legislative analyst for a large state and a legislative office manager the work was challenging, sometimes frustrating and crazy making, always ever-changing and could, on a really good day, be downright fun and rewarding. In my 24th year my boss of 10 years retired, our wonderful secretary left and at the same time the entire "culture" of the organization began to change and not for the better. A new chief (political appointee) was installed and I made my move, accepting a promotion in a related function and still involved in the political side of things. As for the new chief I didn't wish to work for, after decimating the Office of Legislation she turned tail and ran after three months.

A year later and several years earlier than planned, I said enough is enough. Work was no longer fun or fulfilling, I'd been fully vested in my pension and retirement healthcare benefits for years so I pulled the plug. It was one of the best decisions I ever made. Life is too short to simply mark-time in a career that no longer brings us pleasure. Money isn't everything. Peace of mind is way ahead of it. I've never looked back or regretted my spur-of-the-moment decision to retire when I did.
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,527 posts, read 39,903,732 times
Reputation: 23634
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
I'm 54 ... I sometimes WISH my company would lay us all of from my union covered job, so I could get 47 weeks of vacation pay and severance. ...

My job doesn't have sabbaticals....
Be careful what you wish for? I had been wishing for 15 yrs (wanted to be home while kids were still at home) Many coworkers go the offer, but not our work group. FINALLY it came (not at good time, but I took it for the great severance (2 yr pay + 2 yr free college + 2 yr unemployment while in college)... ONLY to find out severance was taxed at 40%!!! As was sick leave / vacation (had 24 weeks saved).. so that FINAL paycheck (or life) was pretty FINAL and Uncle Sam was very rich! And what I got... was ALL I got (final for next 40 yrs of life))! Then the very day I gave my retirement notice, I had a commercial property investment (purchase) go to close (that had no snowball chance in hxll..)... All of the sudden I have additional BIG monthly obligation on bare land (no income) Then I felt the housing crisis coming on... I was able to liquidate 5 properties that I would have lost (banks can call your commercial notes every 5 yrs)...

Sabbatical!... My INTEL friends used to get Sabbaticals. so After retiring at age 49, I started a NEW 'retirement' plan... 'reverse sabbatical' 7 yrs OFF, then one yr ON (for play money / keep skills current / Design and make projects that require the $500k machines and software I don't have at home). One yr in seven with serious income can smooth retirement bumps (like the last financial crisis)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
My opinion is, DO IT (retire, that is). I owned a trucking business, ...

Life is too short to spend it waiting for time to pass by. ...

Tomorrow isn't promised to any of us. .... Save your health at all costs.

.
Trucking Company Owner!!! You needed to retire!! My family has had trucking companies... you NEVER get a full night's sleep till that last truck is off the road...! I so keenly remember the late night calls of wrecked and broken trucks and drivers in jail... customers missing their goods. While I keep my own semi for 'fun' I also do relief driving for friends who still have to deal with flaky employees!

Quote:
Originally Posted by motordavid View Post
...
Only 52, but we had saved like squirrels, had no mort or debt, and I just didn't care anymore.

12 yrs later, I have no regrets...

If one can afford to bail, and has enough interests, hobbies, a few good friends, loving/supportive spouse, et al, I highly rec'd it.

Do this^^^^ ASAP ^^^^ (reasonably possible, no PERFECT timing). I have great friends who took this same quest at age 52 (no SS, only moderate savings). THEY LOVED it (both their parents had died early so they didn't want to 'chance it').

You can make about anything work, and this couple is now mid 70's and have enjoyed over 20 yrs of RV, boating, skiing for MONTHS every winter, shoestring travel, helping others and much quality time with their own grandkids (and others).

Tragically, their keen advisor had EVERYTHING in Madoff (without their knowledge) Poof, GONE.

They sold a off rental home assets and now are happy as clams working together in a handyman business.

Making lemonade from the Lemons life throws at us all.

These people are strong, and of good courage. Great source of inspiration.
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:41 AM
 
34,355 posts, read 41,427,648 times
Reputation: 29841
At 59 you are on retirements doorstep already what is to be gained by enduring a high stress situation for another couple of years. I'd assume at 59 you have your financial house in order regarding retirement.If i were you i'd retire while you still have the health to do so and start fulfilling those retirement dreams you no doubt have thought about.
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:46 AM
 
1,176 posts, read 2,041,665 times
Reputation: 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
I've practiced for 30 years, I'm burned out, I feel like a rusty robot, it's no longer a career, it's a pay check and saving as much as I can for retirement. How much money is enough? Who knows. All the regulations, mandates, insurance games, documentation requirements, goals, incentives, my life has turned into one big game, taking care of people is no longer the focus, satisfaction surveys and 5 star ratings are center stage. Feel trapped, don't appreciate my ability to work however, and I am probably pounding sand and need a reality check. No job change anticipated, it's the same everywhere. I'm going to be 59 shortly, need benefits for me and my spouse. Anybody else feel this way? Is this how it gets towards the end of full time employment? If my father were alive he would tell me to stop whining, be glad I can get up, walk, talk, and if nothing else, go to work, keep your nose to the grindstone until you can't do it anymore, don't dig holes for other people, they'll dig their own and eventually fall in, and consider yourself working for God. [maybe I answered my own dilemma] But I want to walk out of there, wipe my hands and feet clean and be done with it, do something totally different but I see no options. I don't want to take a financial risk investing in a new business, I don't have that kind of brain. Trapped and burned out, what a way to wind things down. Anyone want to take me on? Anyone with similar thoughts/feelings? Any thoughts on coping when you're stuck and have to work for benefits and a paycheck? Any feedback appreciated. Thanks.
If you retire, you'll love the first two months.

Then you'll start mowing the lawn with scissors... Just because it occupies a larger chunk of the day.



I know a surgeon who retired from his practice when he realized that (as he put it) he would have to start cutting everyone who walked into his office open in order to exceed his overhead enough to be worthwhile. He now works as an expert witness and insurance fraud evaluator and loves it. About 30 hours per week, lots of golf and lots of fishing.

Have you considered that there may be other things that you can do with yourself that your experience and education will be relevant to that do not involve a practice?
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Old 07-16-2014, 10:50 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,856,777 times
Reputation: 11886
Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
I've practiced for 30 years, I'm burned out, I feel like a rusty robot, it's no longer a career, it's a pay check and saving as much as I can for retirement. How much money is enough? Who knows. All the regulations, mandates, insurance games, documentation requirements, goals, incentives, my life has turned into one big game, taking care of people is no longer the focus, satisfaction surveys and 5 star ratings are center stage. Feel trapped, don't appreciate my ability to work however, and I am probably pounding sand and need a reality check. No job change anticipated, it's the same everywhere. I'm going to be 59 shortly, need benefits for me and my spouse. Anybody else feel this way? Is this how it gets towards the end of full time employment? If my father were alive he would tell me to stop whining, be glad I can get up, walk, talk, and if nothing else, go to work, keep your nose to the grindstone until you can't do it anymore, don't dig holes for other people, they'll dig their own and eventually fall in, and consider yourself working for God. [maybe I answered my own dilemma] But I want to walk out of there, wipe my hands and feet clean and be done with it, do something totally different but I see no options. I don't want to take a financial risk investing in a new business, I don't have that kind of brain. Trapped and burned out, what a way to wind things down. Anyone want to take me on? Anyone with similar thoughts/feelings? Any thoughts on coping when you're stuck and have to work for benefits and a paycheck? Any feedback appreciated. Thanks.
I was in the construction business for more than 30 years and for many of those years I was making 10 times what I could have working for somebody else. But it was the same thing over and over again only in a different location. I did not look forward to going to work every day. I was 60 at the time I became disabled and because I was a hands on type of owner I chose to close my business rather than let somebody else run it. I went on disability and collected a nice check every month but I was bored staying home. Found out I could work at a different occupation and not lose my benefits so I found a job driving a delivery truck and even though I was making peanuts I found the work enjoyable. When you deliver stuff to people who are waiting for it they are usually very happy to see you. I looked forward to going to this job every single day. So here I was making slightly above min wage and I was happy being a truck driver rather than a business owner.
After I went on SS at 63 we thought it was time to relocate to a warmer state and that's where we're at now.
It's not always all about the money.
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