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Old 07-16-2014, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
3,847 posts, read 3,967,778 times
Reputation: 6494

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
I feel that way right now and I'm 32. I cannot wait to retire. I'm trying to convince my husband that we should downsize our house so that one or both of us can retire or go down to part time work. Work sucks. Consumerism sucks. I've consumed enough crap, I just want my time back.
In a way, younger people know the oppression of careers even more than folks close to retirement IMO. They are more likely to have lives they want to change long-term and feel trapped because even a 6 month sabatical (or period of unemployment) can be financially devestating.

The really oppressive part of working in America is this loss of freedom which I, for one feel every single week, and the modest amount of paid leave.

Anyway, the point I'd really like to make is this: I talk to alot of successful retired folks in their 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, whatever. Just about all of them do not want to talk about their careers for even a minute. So when I see younger people sacrificing things especially in their 30s for their jobs/careers, I feel they are unenlightened, believing in a false god.

Morale of the post- When you are 64, you won't give a darn what you did for the last 40 years vocationally... adjust accordingly.
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Old 07-16-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,275 posts, read 4,765,146 times
Reputation: 4036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Back to NE View Post
In a way, younger people know the oppression of careers even more than folks close to retirement IMO. They are more likely to have lives they want to change long-term and feel trapped because even a 6 month sabatical (or period of unemployment) can be financially devestating.

The really oppressive part of working in America is this loss of freedom which I, for one feel every single week, and the modest amount of paid leave.

Anyway, the point I'd really like to make is this: I talk to alot of successful retired folks in their 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, whatever. Just about all of them do not want to talk about their careers for even a minute. So when I see younger people sacrificing things especially in their 30s for their jobs/careers, I feel they are unenlightened, believing in a false god.

Morale of the post- When you are 64, you won't give a darn what you did for the last 40 years vocationally... adjust accordingly.
I agree. I want to get out of this NOW. I feel enlightened in the sense that at least I'm aware of the sacrafices I am making. I know that my work is pointless. If I were single I would probably build one of those tiny houses on the fringe somewhere and work just enough to pay for the things I need. The problem now is that I am not alone. I honestly cannot imagine coming back to this job everyday once we have children. I hate it now and all I really have to go home to are my husband and hobbies (both of which are great, of coruse). At least I am not sacraficing that much; I'm very lucky that I have skills that are in-demand and pay well without requiring more than 40 hours a week. I have a short and low-stress commute. But, that doesn't stop me from feeling like I am wasting my life for most of the hours I am in this office each day.

I'm continually amazed at how few people around me share my mindset though. Most of the people I know don't know what they would do without their jobs. Meanwhile I have 10,000 ideas in my head of ways I'd rather spend my time than here.
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Old 07-16-2014, 02:37 PM
 
588 posts, read 1,195,949 times
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Thanks so much for all the various points of feedback. I've decided to take the bull by the horns and seek out a financial advisor [have seen 3 over the years, didn't like any of them], I know how to find one now, and see if it's too risky financially to retire right now or what it would look like. We have no debt but also have to wait until I'm at least 62 until I want to start drawing my pension and SS, if I wait until 66 1/2, it's much better, almost twice as much. So 6 years of paying insurance premiums for myself, and 16 years for my spouse who is 10 years my junior, we both have medical issues that will mean high insurance premiums, probably around $2000/month. Ugh. Air out of the sails. I'm going to increase my exercise, and I like the "detach" concept as well. I have drifted away from friends due to my long commute, fatique, and loss of interest in "partying", the work involved in having people over for movie night, or dinner, and on and on. I've turned into a loner and I hate to say that it's so much simpler and I like it. So thanks again for all the feedback, it has been really helpful.
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Old 07-16-2014, 02:44 PM
 
34,360 posts, read 41,436,735 times
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I dont know how you will survive another 6+ years of what you describe in post #1.
I'd suggest consolidating your finances and moving to an inexpensive doublewide mobile home someplace in Florida.
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Old 07-16-2014, 03:24 PM
 
2,037 posts, read 1,945,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
Thanks so much for all the various points of feedback. I've decided to take the bull by the horns and seek out a financial advisor [have seen 3 over the years, didn't like any of them], I know how to find one now, and see if it's too risky financially to retire right now or what it would look like. We have no debt but also have to wait until I'm at least 62 until I want to start drawing my pension and SS, if I wait until 66 1/2, it's much better, almost twice as much. So 6 years of paying insurance premiums for myself, and 16 years for my spouse who is 10 years my junior, we both have medical issues that will mean high insurance premiums, probably around $2000/month. Ugh. Air out of the sails. I'm going to increase my exercise, and I like the "detach" concept as well. I have drifted away from friends due to my long commute, fatique, and loss of interest in "partying", the work involved in having people over for movie night, or dinner, and on and on. I've turned into a loner and I hate to say that it's so much simpler and I like it. So thanks again for all the feedback, it has been really helpful.
If you have a pension that is a big positive for you. If you have your finances set so your house is paid off and you have no debt and you have retirement savings, you can retire with a lower income than you might think. Depending on the amount of your pension you might be able to get Obamacare at more reasonable rates than $2000/month although I have no idea of the details and perhaps others can advise better on that. Then in addition to the pension you can pull out IRA/401K tax deferred money out at low tax rates to tide you over until 66 1/2 for full SS benefits. That could be a decent plan to consider. I think you're in a very good position.
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Old 07-16-2014, 05:59 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 5,714,983 times
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I'm at the tail end of a 3 year breakdown brought on entirely by Career.

I haven't worked since, I had to sell my house and pretty much lost everything including my self respect.

Now, after 3 years and finally some treatment, I'm starting to see this as a Beginning not an End.

What do I REALLY want to do?

The answer lies in the exact opposite of what I was doing, being finance. It's either start my own catering business (passion) or go study and enter some sort of caring profession.

I'm volunteering starting next week at the local school.

Be careful you're not just in love with Things and Status. It's all very well but some people need peace, quiet, self realisation, learning, or giving to be truly happy.

You don't actually need to own property, to be a happy individual! Who knew?!
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Old 07-16-2014, 06:25 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,221,988 times
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Quote:
It all hinges on your comfort zone when it comes to the money.
For ME, at 54 – that is soooo it in a nutshell.
I want it all, but also know I can’t AFFORD it all...so in the meantime while I mull over what I might be able to do – or live with – I’m somewhat miserable.

(I’m sure I’ll get through it it’s just a process. Focusing on blessings helps. Because obsessing about retirement sure isn’t really helping.)

I have traveled, I live in a nice house. I eat out all the time. I want THAT – AND retirement.
I want to travel MORE in retirement – not less.

A financial planner looked at my finances and said I’m in a better position than most for EVENTUAL retirement. (but that doesn’t mean much when about 36% of workers have less than $1,000 in savings and investments).
I’ve got a general plan in place. I just have to bide the time and wait for it to pass.

I’ve thought about taking in a boarder for extra money (think that could speed up retirement day) – but do I REALLY want to do that? No.Right now I have a 3BR, 2-1/2 house to myself, other than me there’s no wear and tear on the house. A boarder would mean more wear and tear on the house, AND loss of privacy.

The bottom line is it’s just not financially practical to retire yet...so I’ve got to figure out a way to stay sane for the next 8-11 years. Am I going to blow my brains out? No. But everyday there IS some little thing that makes me hate working. If it's not having to get up and go to work, or my commute (in the DC area) before I even get to work...then I get to work and either it's so busy I can't eat and pee in the same hour...or I'm so bored I wonder if I can do it one more day.

I’m the OP who started the thread about taking Soc Sec at 62, 65, or 70. Because I’m already DREAMING about it at 54.
Taking time off just makes you want to go back to work LESS.

I really AM blessed..SINK, makes close to 6 figures, a pension coming, a paid off family house i can retire to. So I really have no reason to be unhappy.

My mom having dementia and having to oversee her finances and care (siblings actually to the day-to-day care) hasn’t helped.
(And I had an aunt I coordinated care for as well, who died 8 years ago)
For me – once my priorities changed – that was it. No going back to EVER caring about working again. I’m mentally just into to it.

One of my sayings is – “I’m not saying I want to do nothing. I’ve got plenty to do. But let me retire, and see how long it takes me to want to work or have real time commitments again. I MIGHT surprise myself – and in three months -- want to get back in the game. But I also might know myself quite well – just want to travel and visit friends, garden, read, watch TV, sleep late -- and do nothing much else – ever again.

I had a surgery that had me off from work for 7 weeks a couple of years ago. It was the BEST 7 weeks of my life. I’m trying to figure out what ELSE I can get cut out to get some MORE time off
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Old 07-16-2014, 06:42 PM
 
11,119 posts, read 8,527,266 times
Reputation: 28070
We create the life that we want. You want your life to be about patient care? Then create that. Do you have our own practice? Hire someone to handle all of the insurance stuff and paperwork. Maybe cut back on your hours or volunteer with Doctors Without Borders.

If you want to retire, then retire. If you still have to work, take the steps to make situation as acceptable as possible. You have the power to do that.
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Old 07-16-2014, 07:51 PM
 
726 posts, read 699,364 times
Reputation: 1718
I want to retire and I'm only 26.
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Old 07-16-2014, 08:53 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,221,988 times
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^^ May I ask at 26, why you want to retire?

You don't want to work? Why?
Do you honestly feel burned out at 26?
Do you feel there's too much pressure to achieve, and you can't take the pressure?

I only ask because being so much older, I need helping understanding....
At 54 I can see someone who has worked for 30 years wanting to retire.....
But at 26, it could be seen as laziness, entitlement, or like someone who just doesn't want to work long enough to pay dues long enough to earn the ability to retire. I'm not accusing you of those things, and I know that's my 'old head bias' talking...... which is why I'm asking.

I also know that just as I may not understand why someone at 26 would want to 'retire,' someone older than me who worked until 75.....may not get why I want to retire at 54.
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