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Old 01-26-2015, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,129 posts, read 12,378,690 times
Reputation: 13951

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Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
I've practiced for 30 years, I'm burned out, I feel like a rusty robot, it's no longer a career, it's a pay check and saving as much as I can for retirement. How much money is enough? Who knows. All the regulations, mandates, insurance games, documentation requirements, goals, incentives, my life has turned into one big game, taking care of people is no longer the focus, satisfaction surveys and 5 star ratings are center stage. Feel trapped, don't appreciate my ability to work however, and I am probably pounding sand and need a reality check. No job change anticipated, it's the same everywhere. I'm going to be 59 shortly, need benefits for me and my spouse. Anybody else feel this way? Is this how it gets towards the end of full time employment? If my father were alive he would tell me to stop whining, be glad I can get up, walk, talk, and if nothing else, go to work, keep your nose to the grindstone until you can't do it anymore, don't dig holes for other people, they'll dig their own and eventually fall in, and consider yourself working for God. [maybe I answered my own dilemma] But I want to walk out of there, wipe my hands and feet clean and be done with it, do something totally different but I see no options. I don't want to take a financial risk investing in a new business, I don't have that kind of brain. Trapped and burned out, what a way to wind things down. Anyone want to take me on? Anyone with similar thoughts/feelings? Any thoughts on coping when you're stuck and have to work for benefits and a paycheck? Any feedback appreciated. Thanks.
You're in great shape, with planning in six or seven more years you can tell "them" to pound sand and check out!
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Old 01-26-2015, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,964 posts, read 3,454,424 times
Reputation: 10479
Just keep being there. The last 5 years before I was "let go" as was anyone over 50, except management, were terrible. The tension because we knew the organization was down-sizing & no one knew who would go. Part of me still feels like I should have fought more, because that was the year the depression started. I had 2 part-time jobs after that BUT that was it. I lost my house & have had to live with family.

Hang in there until you are eligible for social security, if u can. It makes all the difference in the world.
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:27 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,901,398 times
Reputation: 18049
I always said it was quite sudden when I decided to retire at 52 having planned for 55. I suggest first give it some time to check that your financially able best you can figure. That is what I did . It took me two months of thinking .If your married be sure to involve your wife.You can plan all your working life to retire but then when its in your face it's quite different; its worth taking your time deciding. Make sure i'st not just a what they call mid life crisis when often people make rash decisions during. Boy; have I seen that. Sorry; I can't make the decision for you.
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Old 01-27-2015, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,886 posts, read 25,311,688 times
Reputation: 26362
I wish you luck making the right decision!

You might want to apply for insurance on the website with your projected post retirement income. You may not have to pay as much as you think.
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Old 01-27-2015, 01:01 AM
 
10,812 posts, read 8,058,272 times
Reputation: 17010
Quote:
Originally Posted by curmudgette View Post
The older I became, the more I realized that time is so much more important to me than money.
DH retired early from a career he loved and in which he had achieved a high level of success. When he announced his retirement almost everyone asked "why?", to which he replied "I can always make more money but I can never make more time".
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:21 AM
 
Location: San Diego
55 posts, read 73,477 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
DH ... replied "I can always make more money but I can never make more time".
Amen to that. That sort of captures the essence of the situation in our 50's and 60's (and even earlier for some).

Comes a time when you gotta do whatever is required to take care of yourself, and, that sure ain't making more money, another promotion, an even bigger empire etc. Every stage in one's life has a focus, an activity that overrides others - learning and socializing in childhood, becoming an individual in adolescence, achieving self sufficiency and starting one's own family in adulthood... and so on. After doing whatever one can do with a "job" or "career", comes a time when it is more important to spend time taking care of oneself.

Like the OP, I was at a stage in my career where I was doing what was necessary, but the passion behind it had long since dwindled. One begins to see the game for what it is - success, metrics, performance, etc. which may be rewarding (in a Pavlovian sort of way), but, not have any personal meaning because those are all scores for the benefit of impressing others and the institution rather than satisfying oneself. I think that this urge to be true to one's self is far more important than any material, social, or, hierarchical achievement one can attain in our life.

How then, does one proceed? I suppose there are as many answers to that question as the number of people who care to take it seriously and try to achieve some sort of resolution. In my case, even after I came to care less for my work, I stayed on a bit longer to make sure that these urges to "let go" were true and came from deep within. Also, I began to recognize certain personal needs that were more important than what work/career gave me. For instance, good health, equanimity, simplicity, etc. Once I had that conviction and some level of comfort of what the financial implications and requirements were, I left. I'm now having a stimulating adventure even if I don't have a clear idea of where the things I'm doing now will take me.

I wish the OP all the best as he/she untangles years of social (and self!) conditioning and comes to terms with these seemingly contradictory urges. Go forth and be well! :-)

Last edited by LaVieQ; 01-27-2015 at 06:37 AM..
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,343 posts, read 10,331,404 times
Reputation: 28468
Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
Thanks for all the folks who responded to my post, lots of excellent advice and support. I studied my finances, I resigned my job, I gave proper notice, and I have a few months to get my house in order, I plan to recreate myself and have lined up a position that is related but totally different compared to what I currently do, much less stress, and decent pay and benefits for another 5-6 years, and then I'm done, some think I'm crazy to leave a prestigious job with a well known organization but I know I'm doing the right thing and feel like a huge weight has been lifted off my shoulders. I just got an email from my boss today with a whole new set of requirements to meet my yearly goals, I just laughed, bye bye! Thanks again everyone.

Judging from your feeling, you are doing the right thing. Sometimes doing the right thing is crazy. It's still the right thing.
I wish you well.
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:47 AM
 
Location: CT
3,461 posts, read 1,854,644 times
Reputation: 4614
I'm only three years from retirement and it's torture. I totally get the situation the OP is in, you put a lot into your career and work hard to be at the top of your game, you work for your family, you go the extra distance for your employer, and they just keep asking for more. Especially as we get late in our careers, few to no raises and no place to go, its kills your spirit. That's where I am, burned out, pretty much invisible to management, I go in and go through the motions until I can leave. I figure I can do three years to get some medical benefits when I leave, in the meantime I can bank more retirement funds, keep honing my plans for the future. So when passion doesn't drive you any more, you have to find that focus to get you through to the end, its the toughest thing I've faced in my career.
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Old 01-27-2015, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Leesburg, FL
4 posts, read 3,137 times
Reputation: 45
Default Burned out

I am 60 years old, burned out and 15 months from early retirement (4/15/16). Plan to retire 4 months before 62 years old and live off of investments (no pension) until I begin drawing social security. Yes, I am taking it at 62! My wife will retire at the same time I do even though she will only be 60 when we retire. she will also take social security when she reaches 62. Neither of us have longevity in our families and both of us have some medical issues.

Wife and I have had several discussions with our financial planner and we can afford to retire as planned. Our meetings were real eye openers and questions were asked that I never really thought about but, we can make it work! Health care could be an issue but I'm fairly certain we can make the jump financially as neither of us are spenders and we do not live a lavish lifestyle. One big reason is we will be debt free this year!

Emotionally, retirement will not be an issue as both of us want to be done with work and enjoy the remainder of our lives together, work-free. It also helps that my wife is my best friend and we will be married 40 years in September!

Every day is a struggle at work. I am the "go-to" guy for everything because I know more than anyone else and I take the time to answer questions or find answers to questions from other people! But...I'm not worth being on the succession plan announced by management because of my age, even though no one in management has ever discussed my future plans with me. As others have said in this post, management doesn't have a clue, and my company is profitable in spite of management - that's right, in spite of management!

I still do everything I can but there are times when I want to tell everyone to "f*** off" but that is not my nature. I guess I'll just keep plugging away and be civil to everyone but I have become more vocal about deadlines, priorities and additional work dumped on me.

As others have said, planning trips in the future really helps. It gives me and my wife something to look forward to and get us through each day and week. It's sad but that's where we are at. Most weekends we talk about retirement and what we will do; where we will live; what it will be like; etc.

Nobody can tell you what to do when you are burnt out or what the future will hold for any of us! Plan accordingly and hope for the best! I read this somewhere --- nobody, that has ever been close to dying, wished they had worked one more day!
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:08 PM
 
Location: So Cal
11 posts, read 12,755 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaVieQ View Post
Amen to that. That sort of captures the essence of the situation in our 50's and 60's (and even earlier for some).

Comes a time when you gotta do whatever is required to take care of yourself, and, that sure ain't making more money, another promotion, an even bigger empire etc. Every stage in one's life has a focus, an activity that overrides others - learning and socializing in childhood, becoming an individual in adolescence, achieving self sufficiency and starting one's own family in adulthood... and so on. After doing whatever one can do with a "job" or "career", comes a time when it is more important to spend time taking care of oneself.

Like the OP, I was at a stage in my career where I was doing what was necessary, but the passion behind it had long since dwindled. One begins to see the game for what it is - success, metrics, performance, etc. which may be rewarding (in a Pavlovian sort of way), but, not have any personal meaning because those are all scores for the benefit of impressing others and the institution rather than satisfying oneself. I think that this urge to be true to one's self is far more important than any material, social, or, hierarchical achievement one can attain in our life.

How then, does one proceed? I suppose there are as many answers to that question as the number of people who care to take it seriously and try to achieve some sort of resolution. In my case, even after I came to care less for my work, I stayed on a bit longer to make sure that these urges to "let go" were true and came from deep within. Also, I began to recognize certain personal needs that were more important than what work/career gave me. For instance, good health, equanimity, simplicity, etc. Once I had that conviction and some level of comfort of what the financial implications and requirements were, I left. I'm now having a stimulating adventure even if I don't have a clear idea of where the things I'm doing now will take me.

I wish the OP all the best as he/she untangles years of social (and self!) conditioning and comes to terms with these seemingly contradictory urges. Go forth and be well! :-)

So well stated. Thank you!
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