U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-18-2014, 11:15 AM
 
11,936 posts, read 20,392,868 times
Reputation: 19328

Advertisements

I quilt and crochet. I prefer patterns that aren't easy. Quilting, in particular, really doesn't make any sense to me. I end up reading and rereading the pattern, writing all over it (which is why I photocopy it) and working it through by sewing it in my head over and over before I even take a rotary cutter to the fabric.

And I've been quilting for almost 20 years.

If that's not a major brain teaser I don't know what is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-18-2014, 12:38 PM
 
10,817 posts, read 8,065,019 times
Reputation: 17029
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
The afternoon before going I go out to my local dealer, a liquor store, and purchase tomorrow's edition of the Daily Racing Form. In California it costs $9.18 after tax. The DRF lists the past performances of horses entered in the races at several race tracks. The data for each runner is a mass of numbers, letters, and symbols, that for those not familiar with them, appear bewildering.

I love handicapping! and you're right, it's a massive mental workout.
I purchase the DRF online for $2.95, then print it out. Since we have a laser printer, the printing cost is negligible. (I print only the DRF classic, which has all the Beyer, workout, post position, etc. information.)

Here's my twist: I only go to the track 2-3 times a year and don't do any off track betting. Instead, I use the DRF, place phantom bets, and I track my phantom wins/losses on paper. I start each month with a $1000 phantom account, and usually handicap 10-20 races a month. If my $1k runs out, I'm done for the month.
It's almost as much fun as real betting, and it keeps me sharp for when I do go to live meets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2014, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,730 posts, read 5,280,920 times
Reputation: 4188
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post

I love handicapping! and you're right, it's a massive mental workout.
I purchase the DRF online for $2.95, then print it out. Since we have a laser printer, the printing cost is negligible. (I print only the DRF classic, which has all the Beyer, workout, post position, etc. information.)

Here's my twist: I only go to the track 2-3 times a year and don't do any off track betting. Instead, I use the DRF, place phantom bets, and I track my phantom wins/losses on paper. I start each month with a $1000 phantom account, and usually handicap 10-20 races a month. If my $1k runs out, I'm done for the month.
It's almost as much fun as real betting, and it keeps me sharp for when I do go to live meets.
Hmmm, now this is an interesting take on racing, but it would not be for me. If I picked a $1000 superfecta or Pick-4 "on paper" phantom bet but did not bet it for real it would spoil my whole week. An alternative to going to the track or otb site or just playing for phantom fun bets would be to open an ADW account and make small wagers online. Then just sit back and watch TVG or HRTV, or live video online, whichever is available in your area, and enjoy the fun.

In comparing prices, have found that buying the hard copy paper Form is actually still cheaper than purchasing online pps from the DRF or Brisnet. Lots of griping about the recent sharp price increases of the DRF in the last few years, but it still gives us at least 7 or 8 tracks. A few guys that are daily players buy long term multiple track online packages that save them money, but for the semi regular or casual player these deals are not practical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2014, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Houston/Brenham
4,121 posts, read 4,699,224 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
like reading all those 'best places to retire' articles isn't enough?
LOL!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
My way likely will elicit a few smiles, since it is, shall we say, a bit unusual, but it seems to work for myself and for many other older folks, mostly older men. I play the horses. Usually either go to the track or off track betting facility a couple of times a week.
I like the way you think!

Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post

I love handicapping! and you're right, it's a massive mental workout.
I purchase the DRF online for $2.95, then print it out. Since we have a laser printer, the printing cost is negligible. (I print only the DRF classic, which has all the Beyer, workout, post position, etc. information.)

Here's my twist: I only go to the track 2-3 times a year and don't do any off track betting. Instead, I use the DRF, place phantom bets, and I track my phantom wins/losses on paper. I start each month with a $1000 phantom account, and usually handicap 10-20 races a month. If my $1k runs out, I'm done for the month.
It's almost as much fun as real betting, and it keeps me sharp for when I do go to live meets.
Very cool idea. May try this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2014, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,515,954 times
Reputation: 27566
Mental math exercise:

When you buy your lotto tickets.
Take out the tax and divvy up the money among your relatives making sure you get more. I use 30% as the tax.
Then figure out how much to spend immediately, how much to invest and what return you'd like to see each year.

All in your head and all on the way home from just buying those tickets.

I figure if I ever win then I need to be ready
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2014, 01:42 PM
 
223 posts, read 274,669 times
Reputation: 443
I am a serial student and I believe that it has helped to keep my mind sharp. Of course, I'm only 43 so I might not remember this conversation in a few years!!!

There are a lot of free courses that are available online, if you're not looking for college credits. MIT offers most of their classes online for free:

Free MIT Classes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2014, 10:55 PM
 
10,817 posts, read 8,065,019 times
Reputation: 17029
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
Mental math exercise:

When you buy your lotto tickets.
Take out the tax and divvy up the money among your relatives making sure you get more. I use 30% as the tax.
Then figure out how much to spend immediately, how much to invest and what return you'd like to see each year.
LOL, I've actually done this, agree it's one way to 'stretch the brain'.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2014, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,695,295 times
Reputation: 51904
I play FlipWords2 to keep my mind sharp, seek and find object games like the Big City Adventure series games to keep my eyes sharp and Bejeweled 3 to keep my mind and reflexes speedy.

Flip Words 2 is a word game. You get more points if you find bigger words and then there is a a person, phrase, location, title, etc. to solve. You see your score compared to others and compared to your previous scores. I usually play for days. You can stop and resume whenever you want. It will save your game.

Big City Adventures takes you to San Francisco, Japan, London, Paris, Sydney, New York City, etc. You "visit" different parts of the city to find hidden objects plus there is a description of the location so you learn something about the city for that particular game. Each game is a different location. In between locations there are different puzzles. You can "buy" hints if you get stuck. You can stop whenever you want and your game will be saved.

Bejeweled 3, or at least the Bejeweled series is probably familiar to everyone.

I play all games off-line, that is, on my hard drive.

I read nonfiction but that's not a game.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2014, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post

Bejeweled 3, or at least the Bejeweled series is probably familiar to everyone.
Not quite everyone. This is the first time I've ever heard of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2014, 05:52 PM
 
Location: The South
5,226 posts, read 3,637,448 times
Reputation: 7911
I record and watch every Jeopardy show.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top