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Old 07-19-2014, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,786 posts, read 7,704,486 times
Reputation: 15067

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Since you are having a hard time getting hired for a job, I would humbly suggest you find something like a self-employment situation. I've researched quite a few of these. That way you can have more charge over your own hours etc. You could start a small backyard farm. (Check this out on Youtube) Some people are making good money just having a small farm on their property, less than an acre, and selling the vegetables. I have a couple of friends who retired to their own homefixup or painting business. There's other ideas out there.
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Old 07-19-2014, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Colorado
274 posts, read 416,230 times
Reputation: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaofan View Post
Do you have Costco, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, or Starbucks in your area? They are supposed to be good companies to work for and open to hiring "mature" workers.

I hope you are able to find something suitable soon.
I guess you didn't read the part about a 'chronic spinal' problem that this person has. I know what that is and the companies you mentioned would be out of the question for this person if they can't stand, move around or lift things because of it. I have spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis, neuropathy in both feet .... and I could never work at these places. I have been unemployed since Feb. 2012 - and after many applications, a few interviews Walmart gave me a job - I last exactly 18 hours (2 days behind a computer - training, and finally 2 excruciatingly painful hours standing by another clerk at the checkout register) I had no choice but to quit and could barely 'walk' out of the store. I have given up on finding ANY job anymore because there aren't any for me. And to some of the others commenting - please don't tell 'us' to 'enjoy' our retirement - mine is pain - non-stop now - the only thing keeping me here is the pain meds I take.
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Old 07-19-2014, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,872,076 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceg0720 View Post
I guess you didn't read the part about a 'chronic spinal' problem that this person has. I know what that is and the companies you mentioned would be out of the question for this person if they can't stand, move around or lift things because of it. I have spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis, neuropathy in both feet .... and I could never work at these places. I have been unemployed since Feb. 2012 - and after many applications, a few interviews Walmart gave me a job - I last exactly 18 hours (2 days behind a computer - training, and finally 2 excruciatingly painful hours standing by another clerk at the checkout register) I had no choice but to quit and could barely 'walk' out of the store. I have given up on finding ANY job anymore because there aren't any for me. And to some of the others commenting - please don't tell 'us' to 'enjoy' our retirement - mine is pain - non-stop now - the only thing keeping me here is the pain meds I take.
I do know what you mean. I had to retire at age 58 (almost 11 years ago) because of medical issues. And never found another job. Gradually (very slowly) my health improved. During that time my wife decided to expand her part-time business and we both are now involved in it. Today we are doing quite well although health-wise I've had a couple of minor relapses. Believe me, I understand what you've gone thru (especially after my own health experiences).

I was replying to the OP in that given his circumstances, just move on, enjoy his retirement. Realistically, thats probably his best bet.
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Old 07-19-2014, 07:53 PM
 
1,985 posts, read 3,288,356 times
Reputation: 1606
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceg0720 View Post
I guess you didn't read the part about a 'chronic spinal' problem that this person has. I know what that is and the companies you mentioned would be out of the question for this person if they can't stand, move around or lift things because of it. I have spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis, neuropathy in both feet .... and I could never work at these places. I have been unemployed since Feb. 2012 - and after many applications, a few interviews Walmart gave me a job - I last exactly 18 hours (2 days behind a computer - training, and finally 2 excruciatingly painful hours standing by another clerk at the checkout register) I had no choice but to quit and could barely 'walk' out of the store. I have given up on finding ANY job anymore because there aren't any for me. And to some of the others commenting - please don't tell 'us' to 'enjoy' our retirement - mine is pain - non-stop now - the only thing keeping me here is the pain meds I take.
Have you had a look at the most recent surgeries for stenosis? Not all people are candidates, but there are minimally invasive procedures out there that change folks' lives. I'm sorry you have so much pain.
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Old 07-19-2014, 10:14 PM
 
13,043 posts, read 15,393,961 times
Reputation: 15297
I know several people in their mid to late 50s who in the last year are suddenly out of job due to technology. When they look for another job working for the same company, they are competing with much younger workers. Sometimes because of their seniority they are offered another job, but sometimes not and forced to "retire," but are too young to collect Social Security. Some have retirement money saved and some don't, some have spouses and some don't, but none were expecting to stop working in their 50s.
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Old 07-20-2014, 04:23 PM
 
6,253 posts, read 4,731,924 times
Reputation: 12844
I think there is a sad story here, but also it seems that some people paint themselves into a corner. Having medical issues is sad but there are choices on fitting in when it is necessary to wear a tie. One can also make a choice in being friendly and being able to work in jobs where that is important. If you really need a job sometimes you have to go to where the jobs are. Moving away from better options might not work out.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:41 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,908 posts, read 1,588,036 times
Reputation: 7952
Well I just have to chime in here about the tie issue... I feel the same way as the OP & any job I would ever get that required me to wear one would be an "any port in a storm" short-lived one. Luckily, but really through design, I made it to 62 never needing to wear a tie for work & having good jobs. I am absolutely positive that it was 12 years in childhood of wearing a suit & tie for religious schools that put me off them (& religion).

My comic nightmare is that my survivors will put me in a suit & tie for my wake & I will spend eternity wearing it!
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Old 07-21-2014, 10:40 AM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,262,973 times
Reputation: 11315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
You are 64, an age at which finding a decent job is difficult. I sympathize, but that does not help you any. The reason I quoted only the last two lines of your post is to thank you for the sentiment you expressed there. It is somehow reassuring to find someone who gets satisfaction from working, from earning his way by doing something. This Retirement Forum is filled with posts by people who cannot stand working, who hate their jobs with a passion, who repeat over and over how life only begins when work ends. Good for you. I was beginning to think I was the only one.
The Rider has posted many times regarding his own take on working and consequently his puzzled views regarding the posts from those who truly hated their JOB, but NOT their work. I loved my work for many years, it brought the ultimate satisfaction to me, and it was a great source of personal pride for me. What I hated was the fact that my work was simply a commodity for my boss to sell to others, therefore he never understood the view I had of my talent. Increased speed, decreased quality, and little appreciation for the talent brought to the job, that was my main complaint with the JOB.

THIS, is what so many here have failed to articulate in our posts, and the reason so many have felt more than a little frustration at the head shaking of those who feel far differently about the work they did all of their days. In his book titled, Working, Studs Terkel wrote about the damage to one's soul that work can inflict, the constant need to have your skills represented as nothing more than a dollars value can be demeaning to even the most optimistic worker. Throughout the book his interviews with many workers from the Piano tuner to the Steelworker brings forth an underlying resentment not with the work itself, but moreover, the demeaning experience that seems to be a result of the commodification of our labor. I hope this clears the air about the difference between a JOB and it's WORK........
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Old 07-22-2014, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,687 posts, read 33,690,741 times
Reputation: 51892
Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
The Rider has posted many times regarding his own take on working and consequently his puzzled views regarding the posts from those who truly hated their JOB, but NOT their work. I loved my work for many years, it brought the ultimate satisfaction to me, and it was a great source of personal pride for me. What I hated was the fact that my work was simply a commodity for my boss to sell to others, therefore he never understood the view I had of my talent. Increased speed, decreased quality, and little appreciation for the talent brought to the job, that was my main complaint with the JOB.........
I found, when I first retired, that the things I liked about my job, I unconsciously translated to retirement activities. You know, if you liked the helping customers aspect of your job (but not the other bulls**t), you'll seek out things to do in retirement where you provide assistance. At some community event, for example, you'll probably gravitate to the information booth volunteer job as opposed to the setting up or selling tickets jobs, for example. If you liked teaching training classes or just plain old teaching, you'll find yourself doing it with your hobby maybe in club activities. If you liked being a manager, you'll probably wind up running some kind of club or event after a few years. If you built things at work and liked it, you'll look to building things at home.

One personal example: I liked competition at work and now I like competitions in my photography clubs, best. Photography is a hobby I picked up after I retired.
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,508,813 times
Reputation: 15950
Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
The Rider has posted many times regarding his own take on working and consequently his puzzled views regarding the posts from those who truly hated their JOB, but NOT their work. I loved my work for many years, it brought the ultimate satisfaction to me, and it was a great source of personal pride for me. What I hated was the fact that my work was simply a commodity for my boss to sell to others, therefore he never understood the view I had of my talent. Increased speed, decreased quality, and little appreciation for the talent brought to the job, that was my main complaint with the JOB.

THIS, is what so many here have failed to articulate in our posts, and the reason so many have felt more than a little frustration at the head shaking of those who feel far differently about the work they did all of their days. In his book titled, Working, Studs Terkel wrote about the damage to one's soul that work can inflict, the constant need to have your skills represented as nothing more than a dollars value can be demeaning to even the most optimistic worker. Throughout the book his interviews with many workers from the Piano tuner to the Steelworker brings forth an underlying resentment not with the work itself, but moreover, the demeaning experience that seems to be a result of the commodification of our labor. I hope this clears the air about the difference between a JOB and it's WORK........
Thanks -- I think this post gets to the heart of the matter.

We all have foibles -- it's not just the issue of "getting things done"; we've been led to expect them done our way. I can understand this up to a point, but several factors -- our continuously-increasing diversity, more disposable income, the breakdown of the Old Standards that arose from the crises of Depression and World War and finally, a lot of what is rooted in something as "primal" as the emancipation of women (which, obviously, is not going to be undone), have put greater personal demands on the people trying to run a business in a service-oriented world, and that pressure, in turn, falls on subordinates who feel less-empowered, thereby, less accountable.

"What we got here is a failure to communicate." -- between a market/customer led to expect too much by Madison Avenue, and a employee who feels he/she is getting less and less in return for his/her efforts.

At this point, I'm "dead in the water" emotionally -- turned loose from a job where I had no problems other than a physical standard I could no longer meet. I miss the satisfaction of accomplishing something, and have no idea where to go to produce something else that's more than a big, phony smile and a "Have a nice day." I would never blow up or take the frustrations out on someone who has even less of a clue than I do, but I resent the insincerity, the apparent hypocrisy, and the contradictions.

And what scares me more is that this might be the start of another step on a long, slow trip downhill.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 07-23-2014 at 09:03 AM..
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