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Old 03-14-2015, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,200 posts, read 8,509,345 times
Reputation: 35575

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
This is the other warning to young people: Don't expect to be in good paying employment past age 50. Save accordingly.
Definitely this....even if this is a bit pessimistic, there have been studies done showing that sizable raises in a career peak in the 40's along with promotions for most (except top management, obviously). So even if you remain employed, your income may not do much beyond keep up with inflation given being "topped out" and unable to break into management.
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Old 03-16-2015, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,501,291 times
Reputation: 15950
It has now been exactly 7 days since my last "gig" ended; I'll try to outline all the options, parameters and constraints, and would welcome any advice:

The assignment ended because the temp agency has a strict rule against an assignment exceeding a specified number of hours. No negative behaviors were cited; I was, in fact commended twice for positive performance. But this happened to be one of a limited number of situations where my age (65) and sub-par motor skills were not a factor. The parent company has reiterated that I won't be allowed to re-hire -- presumably due to previous issues, but I have to suspect that age is the principal deterrent.

I can reapply for exactly the same job after a 2-3 month hiatus; pay is $13.50/hr, at least $2/hr over any other local temp job, also "second-tier" insurance benefits -- not that big an issue since I qualify for Medicare.

I'm investigating part-time work, hopefully in something where my background (strong in bookkeeping and tax prep) would allow me to "stretch" the seven months of Unemployment benefits for which I qualify. If possible, I'd like to delay activation of Social Security until age 70 in the hope of a larger benefit.

So I'm undecided at this point between simply waiting out the layoff (Restarting in June would enable me to complete the "new". and presumably identical "gig" before the winter, and the difficult driving conditions which were a problem this time around set in), or trying to pick up a part-time job (probably as a dispatcher, another of my skills) while continuing to seek something not quite so fast-paced as the assignment I recently finished.

I'm naturally attracted to the evening, night and weekend shifts a lot of younger applicants scorn due to the less-regimented atmosphere, and have shown an ability to make best use of the limited outside resources available during those hours.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 03-16-2015 at 07:07 PM..
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Old 03-16-2015, 08:17 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 6,603,153 times
Reputation: 8308
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
It's not the tie itself (I wear one for fraternity reunions and the like). It's the atmosphere -- the constant phony self-effacement and sycophancy that seems to go with any office job in a corporate environment -- the only thing I can liken it to is being back in a Junior High classroom.
I hear you on that. I work in an office full of ass kissers, obnoxiously phony people wearing cheesy fake smiles and fake laughing, etc. Throw in some idiots and jerks too.

You also have to watch every little thing that comes out of your mouth so you don't get backstabbed by some sociopath who enjoys throwing people under the bus.

I've worked in three offices and they have all been like that. It's nauseating.

Last edited by statisticsnerd; 03-16-2015 at 08:41 PM..
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Old 03-16-2015, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,760 posts, read 10,832,098 times
Reputation: 16632
You are in a difficult situation, but, not hopeless ... although the reality is that there aren't many employers willing to hire 64-year old's, when there are so many available young, educated people looking for works. At 64, with a pension and SS in the wings, you are in better shape than many. That may not be any consolation, but, many who are 'downsized' at your age, can't really afford to retire ... if forced to do so.
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Old 03-16-2015, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
It has now been exactly 7 days since my last "gig" ended; I'll try to outline all the options, parameters and constraints, and would welcome any advice:

The assignment ended because the temp agency has a strict rule against an assignment exceeding a specified number of hours. No negative behaviors were cited; I was, in fact commended twice for positive performance. But this happened to be one of a limited number of situations where my age (65) and sub-par motor skills were not a factor. The parent company has reiterated that I won't be allowed to re-hire -- presumably due to previous issues, but I have to suspect that age is the principal deterrent.

I can reapply for exactly the same job after a 2-3 month hiatus; pay is $13.50/hr, at least $2/hr over any other local temp job, also "second-tier" insurance benefits -- not that big an issue since I qualify for Medicare.

I'm investigating part-time work, hopefully in something where my background (strong in bookkeeping and tax prep) would allow me to "stretch" the seven months of Unemployment benefits for which I qualify. If possible, I'd like to delay activation of Social Security until age 70 in the hope of a larger benefit.

So I'm undecided at this point between simply waiting out the layoff (Restarting in June would enable me to complete the "new". and presumably identical "gig" before the winter, and the difficult driving conditions which were a problem this time around set in), or trying to pick up a part-time job (probably as a dispatcher, another of my skills) while continuing to seek something not quite so fast-paced as the assignment I recently finished.

I'm naturally attracted to the evening, night and weekend shifts a lot of younger applicants scorn due to the less-regimented atmosphere, and have shown an ability to make best use of the limited outside resources available during those hours.
I take it the dilemma is not wanting to take a part-time dispatching job and then quitting on them at the end of the hiatus for the other job? I don't have any advice, as it sounds like a rather personal choice. Where would you rather be in 2-3 months? How much do you enjoy not having to go into work at all? If the answer is "a lot", then that would be a point in favor of waiting out the hiatus. Why not look around to see if you can land something you think you'll really like, then make the decision if you do find something?
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:15 AM
 
26,075 posts, read 28,478,940 times
Reputation: 24783
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Definitely this....even if this is a bit pessimistic, there have been studies done showing that sizable raises in a career peak in the 40's along with promotions for most (except top management, obviously). So even if you remain employed, your income may not do much beyond keep up with inflation given being "topped out" and unable to break into management.
Thank you .

Americans need a moderate dose of pessimism, IMO. Too many, like Suze Orman says, (and I don't even like her that much) live their lives as if they will never lose their jobs, never get sick, never get old, etc. It's not realistic. These are just normal things that happen over the course of a lifetime.

And the good news is being in a position to be financially independent, or at least at the point where having to take lower paying employment isn't going to kill you, means the STRESS LEVEL GOES WAY DOWN...which will actually make you a lot happier in the long run. I am in my 40s and am approaching the point where if I lost my ok paying (with great benefits), but low stress, job went away tomorrow, I'd be ok for retirement even if all I could get is crappy employment for the rest of my life. While it is not happiness itself, it's a big relief to be in this position at my age.
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:52 AM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,129,272 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Thank you .

Americans need a moderate dose of pessimism, IMO. Too many, like Suze Orman says, (and I don't even like her that much) live their lives as if they will never lose their jobs, never get sick, never get old, etc. It's not realistic. These are just normal things that happen over the course of a lifetime.

And the good news is being in a position to be financially independent, or at least at the point where having to take lower paying employment isn't going to kill you, means the STRESS LEVEL GOES WAY DOWN...which will actually make you a lot happier in the long run. I am in my 40s and am approaching the point where if I lost my ok paying (with great benefits), but low stress, job went away tomorrow, I'd be ok for retirement even if all I could get is crappy employment for the rest of my life. While it is not happiness itself, it's a big relief to be in this position at my age.

I like that Mr. Moneymustache site you linked on another thread. He speaks of "retiring at 30" but a deeper read shows he's not referring to striking it rich at 30. He's talking about living in a drastically frugal manner that brings financial independence via radical controls on spending.
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Old 03-23-2015, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,501,291 times
Reputation: 15950
Two weeks have now passed and most of the Unemployment formalities are complete. I've made contact with a local temp manage who's dealt occasionally, but fairly with me for over fifteen years and updated my situation and longer-tem (If I can be said to have such a view) hopes. I'm going out tomorrow for a prospective; one I found on my own -- not very stressful (a finance-related call center) but the pay is low and I'm getting a vibe that they plan to be around for a while, but only as a "bottom feeder".

Later in the week, my "tempster" contact is referring me to another job in the same I-park, about 16 miles from here. The pay is about the same, but this one will definitely be of limited duration, so I wouldn't have to choose between it and another "season" at the more-demanding, but better-paying warehouse job I'm saving as an "ace in the hole".

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 03-23-2015 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:43 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 1,551,316 times
Reputation: 7405
Quote:
Originally Posted by statisticsnerd View Post
I hear you on that. I work in an office full of ass kissers, obnoxiously phony people wearing cheesy fake smiles and fake laughing, etc. Throw in some idiots and jerks too.

You also have to watch every little thing that comes out of your mouth so you don't get backstabbed by some sociopath who enjoys throwing people under the bus.

I've worked in three offices and they have all been like that. It's nauseating.
Please don't take this the wrong way, but maybe, just maybe, it's you that's the problem.....
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Old 03-24-2015, 07:37 AM
 
9,181 posts, read 9,265,199 times
Reputation: 28754
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Lesson to younger folks: Don't base your identity on what you do for paid employment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
This is the other warning to young people: Don't expect to be in good paying employment past age 50. Save accordingly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Only if you let it become that.
I know its not possible for everyone to work for themselves. Some careers simply don't allow for that.

However, working for one's self in a profession or a business that one has started is the perfect solution to being fired or laid off. Your income may fluctuate year to year, but you will never be subject to the whims of a bad boss again!

I just wish when people were younger, more would consider this.
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