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Old 04-27-2015, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,498,921 times
Reputation: 15950

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Seven weeks now passed since I "maxed out" on my previous "gig"; after thirteen weeks (90 days actually) I can reapply, and have been advised "off the record" that a return to the old job (as a "temp") isn't likely to be a problem. But the same source has also made it clear that an official rehire by the parent company, with reinstatement of the benefits that were my real goal, is about as (un)likely.

So I face a couple of less-than-perfect choices.

Another company -- one offering a dispatching opportunity closer to the work in which I've been most satisfied over the years -- has taken an interest in my background, This would be a part-time opportunity to start, and on an overnight shift (something I'm used to and actually prefer over the stagnant "territorial" mindset that seems to common in small offices on the day watch). And very dollar beyond 30% of my basic UC benefit allows me to carry the unused portion of that claim forward -- "stretching" the present claim but likely setting myself up for a smaller one if I'm not fully employed next year. From what I've heard comparing notes with a few other underemployed seniors in the same situation, the phenomenon of "capping" potential income at a certain percentage beyond the Unemployment check is fairly common.

The other alternative is to continue the pattern of seven months of work / 3-month "hiatus" / and repeat, until age, or boredom finally catches up with me; is anyone else out there stuck in something like this?

I don't want to sound like I'm complaining all that much -- but as a lot of people in this forum have observed -- the emergence of the global economy seems to have left a lot of displaced workers in their mature years "stuck in second gear"; work is easy to get, but you have to try very hard to get beyond a certain point -- I'll keep trying.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 04-27-2015 at 07:03 PM..
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Old 04-27-2015, 08:57 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,163 posts, read 1,264,175 times
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Not meaning to sound elitist, but to any young people that read this, please note that the "don't expect to be making good money past 50" comments should definitely be defined as because you were unable, unwilling, or simply did not hqve the ability to choose the right career. You dont have to be a Dr, lawyer or top management to keep making good money. There are plenty of jobs that, if you have the aptitude, will take you comfortably in to the future. But if you expect it be to TV or movie easy, it isnt. Any STEM occupation is always in demand. This is off topic for the OPs intent, but if his occupation had been something like this, he would be both satisified and secure. I don't need anyone telling me "not everyone can be a dr or engineer or accountant ". I know this. Like my snarky math teacher used to say "I don't care if you fail. The world also needs ditch diggers". ( I used to hate his attitude and knew some day I'd love to let him know I turned out way more successful and less pessimistic the than he was. But he died of a massive in his 60s.) Point is, you do have to choose wisely.
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Old 04-28-2015, 05:19 PM
 
26,075 posts, read 28,473,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perryinva View Post
Not meaning to sound elitist, but to any young people that read this, please note that the "don't expect to be making good money past 50" comments should definitely be defined as because you were unable, unwilling, or simply did not hqve the ability to choose the right career. You dont have to be a Dr, lawyer or top management to keep making good money. There are plenty of jobs that, if you have the aptitude, will take you comfortably in to the future. But if you expect it be to TV or movie easy, it isnt. Any STEM occupation is always in demand. This is off topic for the OPs intent, but if his occupation had been something like this, he would be both satisified and secure. I don't need anyone telling me "not everyone can be a dr or engineer or accountant ". I know this. Like my snarky math teacher used to say "I don't care if you fail. The world also needs ditch diggers". ( I used to hate his attitude and knew some day I'd love to let him know I turned out way more successful and less pessimistic the than he was. But he died of a massive in his 60s.) Point is, you do have to choose wisely.
Becoming financially independent at a young age is at least as much about keeping spending in check as it is about income. Obviously, income matters, but not as much as people think. What few realize is that it's possible to live a happy life on a lot less than what the typical American believes.
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Old 04-28-2015, 06:47 PM
 
Location: RVA
2,163 posts, read 1,264,175 times
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Absolutely correct. I couldnt agree more. I know, despite 2 divorces, starting over, making lots and lots of mistakes, I am still a very lucky man. I enjoy my work, and usually my job, I'm paid well, jave my health, no history of genetic illnesses on either side, etc. I had choices growing up and made the best ones I knew how with uneducated parents. I lived below my means when all around me, including my siblings did not. I saved and did without at times, worked at a lower salary for a bigger pension, and karma rewarded me with some great timing. (Doubled what I paid for a fixer upper house bought in Sep2001 and sold in Jan 2007 for $420k) Downsized my house, in an area little affected by the crash, no debt for last 10 years, regular raises and overtime.

I'm not what I consider rich compared to many of my college friends who retired in their 40s & 50s, dotcom millionaires and such. But I'm happy and comfortable, have a wonderful wife, and look forward to every day of my life. That's what's important!
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Old 06-13-2015, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,498,921 times
Reputation: 15950
Well, the imposed "hiatus" ended last weekend. I dropped into the office on Monday, and was pretty much rehired on the spot (one difference this time around; I'll be working part-time; Saturday and Sunday overnights only; whether I can better that by picking up some overtime has not ben made clear). Still, it's an improvement in pay by $3.50/hr over the temping I'd been doing, and a shorter commute by 8 miles in each direction.

Another difference this time around is that since I'll be scheduled for only 20 hours per week, the assignment could last for up to 60 weeks, and the fewer hours (and dollars) per week would mean that next year's Unemployment protection might be somewhat less.

But this arrangement also leaves the entire "traditional" working week free, so I'll use the time to go looking for something where I actually have a chance to use my background, and just maybe, some flexibility in scheduling. I've been cultivating a few contacts at the Job Center and researching and taking a few Civil Service exams, many of which, I was happy to learn, can be taken via the 'Net, but only at a couple of locations, and the two closest are each about an hour's drive away.

The goal at this point isn't money; I'm far from rich, but know a whole lotta ways to make ends meet. For me at least, when you stop all productive activity is when life really starts to go downhill, but the right balance between that and having some time at your disposal when you most want it can be a tricky fit.

And if I have to own up to learning as much about the Unemployment Compensation system, and making use of it to defer reliance on Social Security, I can say with a clear conscience that I play it by the rules, declining a week of benefits once in a while if I'm job-hunting out of town -- something the law requires.

It still beats watching the paint peel.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 06-13-2015 at 06:25 PM..
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Old 06-14-2015, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,128 posts, read 12,373,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
But the same source has also made it clear that an official rehire by the parent company, with reinstatement of the benefits that were my real goal, is about as (un)likely.
You're 65 now and approaching 66 you're getting close to you FRA and have been on Medicare since last fall. From my mid 20's I've always had medical insurance and from my experience nothing beats Medicare for affordability and coverage.

At 65 what other benefits are there that are really worth anything?
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Old 06-16-2015, 02:19 PM
 
26,075 posts, read 28,473,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
Well, the imposed "hiatus" ended last weekend. I dropped into the office on Monday, and was pretty much rehired on the spot (one difference this time around; I'll be working part-time; Saturday and Sunday overnights only; whether I can better that by picking up some overtime has not ben made clear). Still, it's an improvement in pay by $3.50/hr over the temping I'd been doing, and a shorter commute by 8 miles in each direction.
Sounds like a good deal, overall.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
The goal at this point isn't money; I'm far from rich, but know a whole lotta ways to make ends meet. For me at least, when you stop all productive activity is when life really starts to go downhill, but the right balance between that and having some time at your disposal when you most want it can be a tricky fit.
I mostly agree with this. However, some people define "productivity" very narrowly as working a job for a paycheck. I think there's lots of other important work in the world that needs to be done that doesn't involve a paycheck. Nothing wrong with working for a paycheck if that's what you want, but it's not the only way.
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Old 06-28-2015, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,498,921 times
Reputation: 15950
Sorry to report that the "deal" mentioned above fell through; two days before I was to report back to work, I got a call from what was apparently the previous, and prospective employer's HQ, saying that the offer was given in error, but that I could expect a call for a customary seasonal business surge -- sometime around Labor Day.

If the previous year's "gig" is any parallel, this means that I'm likely to work until a maximum limit on hours imposed by the in-house temp agency is reached, and will be commuting on mountainous two-lane highways in the worst of the winter season.

As an aside, I made use of the last six weeks by accepting another "temp" assignment, which ended two days ago. The job was "light manufacturing" involving sorting, stacking, and storing product made in a continuous process with constant monitoring. Without exception, the people involved were very good to work with, but the nature of the process made for a long and tedious day, with virtually no opportunities for creativity. At least, I could postpone the "day of reckoning" when I might have no choice but to go onto Social Security, for another six weeks.
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Old 06-28-2015, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,454 posts, read 5,917,794 times
Reputation: 16130
I'm really sorry to hear that job feel through 2nd. I haven't posted in your thread before but I want to tip my hat to you for wanting to work and contribute.

I have not read every post here but sorry, Perry's post did in fact sound elitist. This entire "it's your own fault" for not having a $60,000 job was the message I read and I'm not sure that's fair. There are a hundred factors in play here. If you grow up with limited resources or in a small town with limited opportunities that shapes your life. By the time you are 30 you kind of are what you are in most cases. I highly doubt a sales manager will look at a guy from rural Appalachia with a blue collar background and suddenly give him the opportunity to be a sales professional covering the Mid-Atlantic. For many college is simply not an option so there's that as well.

I am a big fan of the working man. I admire your persistence and wish you well.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:32 PM
 
26,075 posts, read 28,473,598 times
Reputation: 24783
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
Sorry to report that the "deal" mentioned above fell through; two days before I was to report back to work, I got a call from what was apparently the previous, and prospective employer's HQ, saying that the offer was given in error, but that I could expect a call for a customary seasonal business surge -- sometime around Labor Day.

If the previous year's "gig" is any parallel, this means that I'm likely to work until a maximum limit on hours imposed by the in-house temp agency is reached, and will be commuting on mountainous two-lane highways in the worst of the winter season.

As an aside, I made use of the last six weeks by accepting another "temp" assignment, which ended two days ago. The job was "light manufacturing" involving sorting, stacking, and storing product made in a continuous process with constant monitoring. Without exception, the people involved were very good to work with, but the nature of the process made for a long and tedious day, with virtually no opportunities for creativity. At least, I could postpone the "day of reckoning" when I might have no choice but to go onto Social Security, for another six weeks.
Sorry to hear that. At the same time, it doesn't sound like it will be the end of the world for you if you have to go on Social Security.
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