U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-09-2014, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
I am not sure. We liked the modular because we were able to put heated floors in the construction but they can be added later. We were able to find a company that did that out of Canada. We may or may not build again. We haven't decided yet....
We love radiant heated floors. We had both read about them, and they sounded nice. Now that we are living with one, we think a heated floor is the best option.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-09-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,845,678 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
We love radiant heated floors. We had both read about them, and they sounded nice. Now that we are living with one, we think a heated floor is the best option.
My wife grew up with that in her life. Korea uses that to heat almost every structure. All the homes and apartments area heated that way. In the small huts where they used charcoal to heat (ondol) the heat cam from the tunnel that was really the chimney for the charcoal. It would zig zag across under the floor. It was much safer then the small pot bellied stove they sometimes used for the charcoal. I nearly died from CO2 from a poorly seal and closed room that I was spending the night in Way back in my young and dumb days. I woke to go wee and had a splitting headache. The young lady I was with was unconcious. I had to drag her outside.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2014, 12:13 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,912,172 times
Reputation: 18049
One need to make sure its done right and realize that heat floors are nothing more than more under floor plumbing and subject to same potential problems. Depending on where you build it maybe nice or just a added expense and future problem if not. As a friend who is a builder says the thing is to build with enough insulation;low loss while not creating a home that is too sealed that has moisture problems; as seen with many homes now days. As he said many older homes built when energy was cheap breathe a lot better and didn't have moisture problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2014, 12:29 PM
 
4,776 posts, read 6,607,652 times
Reputation: 6785
Those "Katrina cottages" were pretty cute....they're no longer being sold by Lowes, but they are still available. Just google it.

There is also some guy in Texas who builds small houses out of recycled materials. It's called "Tiny Texas Houses", I think. They're really cute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2014, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,845,678 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
One need to make sure its done right and realize that heat floors are nothing more than more under floor plumbing and subject to same potential problems. Depending on where you build it maybe nice or just a added expense and future problem if not. As a friend who is a builder says the thing is to build with enough insulation;low loss while not creating a home that is too sealed that has moisture problems; as seen with many homes now days. As he said many older homes built when energy was cheap breathe a lot better and didn't have moisture problems.

That is so very true but small precautions are all that are needed. For one reason the water is circulated more often then a baseboard system. Those are subject to much more freezes. For one they generally go up through exterior walls. The flooring ones are not subject to that. They generally go up through interior walls. Yes they go towards the outer edges of the floor they don't have to be left vulnerable to the cold with a little insulation on the ends.

There are also kits that allow the heating pipes to be put on top of the subfloor instead of under. Those can also accept all kinds of flooring to include laminates, carpeting, ceramic tile and hardwood. There is even a version that are just basically heat tape like a toaster wire. Lots of retrofits of baths use that though I would prefer to use the pex tubing.

I have all three floors in my house done. The basement and first and second floors. I ran the pex tubing in the basement before the slab was poured. Easy job done. Never had a problem with the tubing and I live in a region subject to severe weather swings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2014, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,845,678 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Are you building a modular again when you move?

I asked that of my wife last night. Her answer was she wasn't against it. She would consider it and we would have specific requirements when we do build. We have built before using modular but I think I would not go modular on the next one. I think I would stick build using an architech and builder. Getting the right builder though is very important. Plans are pretty straight forward but the builder has to be able to understand blue prints and how to put things in place where they belong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
I asked that of my wife last night. Her answer was she wasn't against it. She would consider it and we would have specific requirements when we do build. We have built before using modular but I think I would not go modular on the next one. I think I would stick build using an architech and builder. Getting the right builder though is very important. Plans are pretty straight forward but the builder has to be able to understand blue prints and how to put things in place where they belong.
Would you ever consider a steel building?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2014, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,845,678 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Would you ever consider a steel building?

I don't know. What I know of steel fab buildings is they go up very quickly. All supports are steel instead of wood 2x4 2x6. The supports are extruded with prefabbed holes for wire and plumbing. The exterior supports can be 2x6 like normal so the insulation factor can be the same. Floor and ceiling joists are stronger but you still need sheething using plywood or OSB. It adds weight and strength to the structure so it can stand higher wind stress. My only concerns would be how it would look on the outside but that can be anything as well as the same drywall on the inside. What are the costs per foot to wood construction? That would be the most important one. Then also would the contractors you higher (builder, and architect) know the best way to construct what I am interested in living in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
I don't know. What I know of steel fab buildings is they go up very quickly. All supports are steel instead of wood 2x4 2x6. The supports are extruded with prefabbed holes for wire and plumbing. The exterior supports can be 2x6 like normal so the insulation factor can be the same. Floor and ceiling joists are stronger but you still need sheething using plywood or OSB. It adds weight and strength to the structure so it can stand higher wind stress. My only concerns would be how it would look on the outside but that can be anything as well as the same drywall on the inside. What are the costs per foot to wood construction? That would be the most important one. Then also would the contractors you higher (builder, and architect) know the best way to construct what I am interested in living in.
Our home is steel.

There are four 'arches' that support everything. It is way over-engineered to resist hurricane, tornado, snow-load factor is 2.5X above code for this region. I have been told that structurally it can support a army tank being parked on the roof.

I sprayed 2" of foam on the walls and roof, and then hung 9" of fiberglass batting, so insulation is around R-60.

Our floor is OSB, with PEX underneath for radiant heating.

Our interior walls are finished with wood grain paneling and dark stained trim. Lighting fixtures and hardware are all done to look like black wrought iron.

We like having an open floor-plan. There are no load-bearing walls/structures in the house. It is all done by the exterior walls. Our interior dividers are wooden cabinets serve as closets, book shelves, china hutches, etc, and they are movable. Want to re-arrange a room? Move the partitions.

I served underwater for most of 20 years, I find today that I like having high ceilings. And I like having lots of windows. Our home has both.

Originally our 2400 sq ft home cost around $35 per square-foot. But then a couple years later we doubled the footprint, by extending the roof out 8 foot on 3 sides [to give us a covered wrap-around porch], and 40 foot on the last side [to give us a large carport]. Now at 4800 sq ft the cost per square-foot is around $18.75

We are not done yet, we are currently in the middle of adding 4400 watts of solar-power. Hoping to get off-grid by the end of the year. We need to spend another $5k to finish that project. I am not sure if I can meet that dead-line, as I must go in for surgery next week, and I may be laid-up for some weeks afterwards.

Our next big project will be an Active Solar heating array, so we can stop paying for heat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2014, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,845,678 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Our home is steel.

There are four 'arches' that support everything. It is way over-engineered to resist hurricane, tornado, snow-load factor is 2.5X above code for this region. I have been told that structurally it can support a army tank being parked on the roof.

I sprayed 2" of foam on the walls and roof, and then hung 9" of fiberglass batting, so insulation is around R-60.

Our floor is OSB, with PEX underneath for radiant heating.

Our interior walls are finished with wood grain paneling and dark stained trim. Lighting fixtures and hardware are all done to look like black wrought iron.

We like having an open floor-plan. There are no load-bearing walls/structures in the house. It is all done by the exterior walls. Our interior dividers are wooden cabinets serve as closets, book shelves, china hutches, etc, and they are movable. Want to re-arrange a room? Move the partitions.

I served underwater for most of 20 years, I find today that I like having high ceilings. And I like having lots of windows. Our home has both.

Originally our 2400 sq ft home cost around $35 per square-foot. But then a couple years later we doubled the footprint, by extending the roof out 8 foot on 3 sides [to give us a covered wrap-around porch], and 40 foot on the last side [to give us a large carport]. Now at 4800 sq ft the cost per square-foot is around $18.75

We are not done yet, we are currently in the middle of adding 4400 watts of solar-power. Hoping to get off-grid by the end of the year. We need to spend another $5k to finish that project. I am not sure if I can meet that dead-line, as I must go in for surgery next week, and I may be laid-up for some weeks afterwards.

Our next big project will be an Active Solar heating array, so we can stop paying for heat.

Interesting. Your house is uniquely built. I am guessing that the lack of fixed interior walls makes most of the reason that the house cost under 100k to build. Your insulation job will shock some but if they knew the weather that you in Maine can experience they would love to have that around them.

Good luck on the operation. Remember if you don't finish you can ask for a person to finish the job or wait until spring since it will be too cold soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top