U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-20-2014, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I suggest that it's not just the house itself that you need to consider in old age planning, but its location too.
Location is, for me/us, even more important than the dwelling itself. We sometimes think we could live rural because we've been offered land. But really, what would be the point as we push 70 and hate to drive (unless it's a road trip). We won't go back to suburbia, that was a wasteland (for our lifestyle). I love in-town. To buy a lot in a desirable city or town costs much. It's possible to purchase a bank-owned property and tear down the distressed/old house and build new. Many of these properties sell the house with the land for a price you could barely buy the land alone for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-20-2014, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,564,810 times
Reputation: 29033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I built a house I expected would last me into old age ten years ago. All one floor, no basement, wide doorways, walk in shower, levers instead of door knobs. It's also energy efficient. And in a scenic setting with an acre of land. The house would be great in old age.

The problem I didn't foresee was that it's way too long a drive to basic services. And it's nearly impossible to get people to repair things so far from town. So now I have to move. I would like to build again, but land closer in to town is scarce and expensive.

I suggest that it's not just the house itself that you need to consider in old age planning, but its location too.
Best advice here. The idea of downsizing to a small home on a big lot is very attractive to a lot of people in their pre-retirement. They are able to think of some practical things related to use of the home like no stairs, energy efficiency, practical floorplan. But most of us don't think about:

1. Losing the ability to drive.
2. Losing the ability to care for the property.
3. Not being able to acquire paid help willing to work at prices you can afford and willing to travel to where you are.
4. If you are a couple, what are the plans for when one of you dies and leaves the other alone?

I know multiple people who were driven from homes they loved and otherwise were suited to them because they were in too remote of an area for a frail elderly person to live alone safely and within their financial means.

Don't just ask yourself questions about what you would like in a "for the rest of your life" home. Ask yourself:

-Who will care for my property and how much will that cost? Being unable to cut grass is the least of the problems. How about pruning and weeding, shoveling snow, raking leaves, cleaning gutters, cleaning the inside of the house, etc.?
-Where will I get my food and other essentials?
-Is there appropriate healthcare nearby? Is there affordable home health care available?
-Will there be public transportation or willing relatives nearby to drive me to appointments? How about if I become reliant on a walker or a wheelchair?

If the answers to those questions are not apparent then you also need to make sure you will be able to sell your forever home for a good enough price to pay for your forever assisted living facility.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2014, 11:09 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,222 posts, read 2,038,982 times
Reputation: 3834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
Best advice here. The idea of downsizing to a small home on a big lot is very attractive to a lot of people in their pre-retirement. They are able to think of some practical things related to use of the home like no stairs, energy efficiency, practical floorplan. But most of us don't think about:

1. Losing the ability to drive.
2. Losing the ability to care for the property.
3. Not being able to acquire paid help willing to work at prices you can afford and willing to travel to where you are.
4. If you are a couple, what are the plans for when one of you dies and leaves the other alone?

I know multiple people who were driven from homes they loved and otherwise were suited to them because they were in too remote of an area for a frail elderly person to live alone safely and within their financial means.

Don't just ask yourself questions about what you would like in a "for the rest of your life" home. Ask yourself:

-Who will care for my property and how much will that cost? Being unable to cut grass is the least of the problems. How about pruning and weeding, shoveling snow, raking leaves, cleaning gutters, cleaning the inside of the house, etc.?
-Where will I get my food and other essentials?
-Is there appropriate healthcare nearby? Is there affordable home health care available?
-Will there be public transportation or willing relatives nearby to drive me to appointments? How about if I become reliant on a walker or a wheelchair?

If the answers to those questions are not apparent then you also need to make sure you will be able to sell your forever home for a good enough price to pay for your forever assisted living facility.
These are all very good points. I didn't think of them when I built my supposedly forever home in my late 50's. By my mid-60's I was beginning to see the location wasn't going to work for me for much longer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2014, 11:31 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,603 posts, read 3,681,147 times
Reputation: 12410
In the long run, I'm wondering about the pay-back for a "green" construction retiree home. How many years for the break-even point for some of the expensive features? How long would I have to live in the home and how long do I have...maybe a morbid thought but that's reality.

I was going to build a 1,800 sq. ft. "greenish" home a little off the beaten path but would have had to drill a well (estimated @ $17 k) and put in an expensive enhanced code septic system with no assurance that the city wouldn't require sewer and water hook-up in a few years and charge me for that. I found an existing house with 1,500 sq. ft. that is fine for me and has more land than I'd have had if I built. It was less expensive than building new and greener because it was already built.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2014, 11:46 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,638 posts, read 40,010,157 times
Reputation: 23801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
,,

... sell your forever home for a good enough price to pay for your forever assisted living facility.
Or hopefully a senior housing co-op where we will be carrying for each other, and have facilities and apartments to age in place through care-needs including Hospice. I have toured several that have 'in-house' contract private care for the greater needs. Apartments provided for caregivers too.

Really can be a good way to age, and one that is very popular in Scandinavian and other countries where communal living is more of the norm.

USA 'independence' is good while you are capable of living independently. !

YMMV on how you want to age. But it's likely you WILL age! In (your) place, or outta (your) place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2014, 03:23 PM
 
Location: it depends
6,074 posts, read 5,338,572 times
Reputation: 5771
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
I'm thinking that is what I'm going to do with the next home.

I want a much smaller home but on a lot with elbow room. I can find the lot but not the home or the home but not the lot.

So I think I'm going to find the perfect lot and then build.

I found these cottage plans which can be altered that I've tucked away in my bookmarks.
I'm also scoping out lot sales for where I want to end up.

Buying land and holding on to it until you're ready is not a big deal.
Pay taxes on unimproved land and once or twice a year have the lot mowed.

I've done both..buy land and later build and buy a home and later move into it.
Buying the home ahead of time is a PITA and I won't do it again.
Buying the land was a piece of cake and mowing it was the only thing I had to worry about.

Here's the site where I found cottage plans:
Small house plans, Cottage plans, mother-in-law homes, guest house plans
HT, I love this link! The 810 foot "narrow lot" plan, 1 bedroom 1.5 bath, would be perfect for me. Unlike you, I'd try to find a tiny lot in a great locale--don't want a lot to clean on the inside, don't want a lot to maintain on the outside. As part of a couple, though, I would need a bigger space.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,556,082 times
Reputation: 27566
Glad to see a few folks liked that link. They are truly small, simple homes but they can be customized by the same company that provides them.

If anything that site provides for ideas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,692 posts, read 49,482,998 times
Reputation: 19136
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Location is, for me/us, even more important than the dwelling itself. We sometimes think we could live rural because we've been offered land. But really, what would be the point as we push 70 and hate to drive (unless it's a road trip). We won't go back to suburbia, that was a wasteland (for our lifestyle). I love in-town. To buy a lot in a desirable city or town costs much. It's possible to purchase a bank-owned property and tear down the distressed/old house and build new. Many of these properties sell the house with the land for a price you could barely buy the land alone for.
Driving around we see a lot of abandoned old houses, that would be prohibitively costly to refurbish. But to bulldoze and start fresh, is a far better option.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2014, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
In the long run, I'm wondering about the pay-back for a "green" construction retiree home. How many years for the break-even point for some of the expensive features? How long would I have to live in the home and how long do I have...maybe a morbid thought but that's reality.

I was going to build a 1,800 sq. ft. "greenish" home a little off the beaten path but would have had to drill a well (estimated @ $17 k) and put in an expensive enhanced code septic system with no assurance that the city wouldn't require sewer and water hook-up in a few years and charge me for that. I found an existing house with 1,500 sq. ft. that is fine for me and has more land than I'd have had if I built. It was less expensive than building new and greener because it was already built.
Yes, I wonder about the same thing. Once you're done with paying for all the "green" stuff, how will that play out in actual savings during our lifetime? I would imagine it would be a selling point though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2014, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,991,724 times
Reputation: 15649
I just got the estimates for a modular home, a modest 1000 SF. That is without the cost for any labor, a foundation, water/sewer hookup or well/septic, or indoor plumbing or electricity. I was taken aback, to say the least.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top