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Old 07-27-2014, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Florida
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When the whole process runs smoothly, flying is not such a big deal.
Depending on how often you have experienced it when it hasn't ....and sometimes, once is enough....it is not something to look forward to.
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Old 07-27-2014, 11:37 AM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,247,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
However, I don't see the process as being terribly onerous, and I am puzzled that some people find it sufficiently inconvenient and unpleasant to swear off flying entirely. What is the big deal, actually?
Maybe it's because some of us do remember what it was like to fly when it was easy. Get to the airport 30 minutes before your flight, show your ticket, and board.

For me, my exact reason is ... the last time I flew was coming home from a Philadelphia vacation on the evening of September 10, 2001. Enough said.
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Old 07-27-2014, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,612 posts, read 1,274,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
Right, I agree with your observations. You have a different personality than my dad, and that is why you can take a four week trip. In his case, my parents never left the place for more than a week, and by the end of the week (it was to visit us and the kids, at that time) he'd be on the phone a few times a day speaking with contractors or other condo board members.

But that doesn't make him pathological, it just means that he enjoys the personal interactions and intellectual engagement. To him, travel is a fairly mindless activity. His comment to me, who likes to travel, is that "a brick is a brick and a tree is a tree. You can see them right down your own street."
I don't think the association has taken over his life, rather he has chosen to devote most of his time to it!
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Old 07-27-2014, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,587,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post

However, I don't see the process as being terribly onerous, and I am puzzled that some people find it sufficiently inconvenient and unpleasant to swear off flying entirely. What is the big deal, actually? We spend an extra 30 minutes (more or less, depending on the length of the lines) in the security check in order to board a flight. Are we, as retirees, so much in a hurry that 30 minutes makes a real difference?
Maybe all it takes is one bad experience.

Before the TSA we had armed soldiers manning the gates..remember ?
Remember the shoe bomber ?

I was flying to FL with my son at the time.
I had on a nice new pair of white keds sneakers.

I had 2 soldiers point their guns at me and physically haul me off to the side leaving my 10 year old screaming and crying at the metal detector also being held back by another soldier.

All because I bought a new pair of keds sneakers.

Talk about traumatic. I was still shaking when I got off the plane in Florida and considered train/bus/rental car for the trip home.

And I have never flown since.
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Old 07-28-2014, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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Flights are more crowded these days as airlines go to fewer flights and "commuter type" planes. Also seats are smaller and more cramped especially in the smaller planes. Now that one has to pay baggage fees, it takes longer for those with carry on to board and the overhead bins and seat front areas are full. No meals unless you pay for it yourself and it is mainly junk food. Fewer snacks and drinks. Families are more likely to travel with babies and young children. Flight attendants are stressed and less friendly. There seem to be more delays due to mechanical problems - I assume maybe due to older planes or may be due to more stringent safety regulations. Overall there are less airline personnel available for assistance. I dread going through Atlanta as I am likely to miss my next connection due to mechanical or weather delays on my first flight. The Delta personnel are not very helpful about rebooking you to a later flight and I have spent several nights in Atlanta - but they make you wait until the last flight to your destination leaves about 11pm before they will pay for the hotel even though the airline staff know that all the flights are booked and you will not get a seat being on standby. Combine all this with the added security precautions and delays and it is not a very pleasant experience. In the 90's and early 2000's I traveled on business at least once a month and sort of enjoyed it.

There are probably many improvements in availability of WiFi, power sources for gizmos, on flight movies (at least for the larger planes), etc. that are appealing to businessmen and younger travelers but that is not really my thing. Some of the larger airports have nice shopping and restaurants but it may be in a different concourse or outside the security area so no time. I was able to hit a nice restaurant in the Atlanta airport because I had a long layover and do some shopping in DFW in the last few years.

Last edited by ABQ2015; 07-28-2014 at 11:00 AM..
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Old 07-28-2014, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,572,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westbound and Down View Post
This probably explains why we are homebodies and don't socialize much: I don't give jerks a second chance to "impress" me - I avoid them. I can only imagine what else pours forth from "friends" like that, which begs the question: why do you hang around jerks like that?

We have a dear friend who loves to entertain, host dinner parties, etc. More or less the opposite of us. And she has described the "friends" they entertain, and they sound like some of the most miserable jerks ever. And without a hint of irony, my friend agrees, says she gets sick of their crap, but...she just "loves to entertain" and to have people around her dinner table, and evidently even if that includes jerks. Fortunately, we don't have the "must be around others" disease that many seem to have. I am sure we are missing out on something, but at least we don't have to voluntarily deal with jerks.
I have a relative who seems to feel her mission is to feed the neighbors. She calls me to complain when they went out and spent the food budget and then show up saying oh oh we don't have money for food... so she fixes something. Sorry if it sounds hard but she knows they blow it on 'stuff' and maybe a lesson is in order. But I think she just feels 'good' when she has someone who even out of sheer irresponsibility needs her to supply the cuppords.

I'm not against helping the neighbors, but when its their own fault, and they know what they spent it on and keep pestering her for this and that in addition to food, its time to say here's a box of top raman and if you do it again you don't even get that.

I just don't get people who have to 'be' some way so their 'friends' will like them. Just be you and if they don't you'd realized that you didn't lose anything.
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Old 07-28-2014, 02:49 PM
 
2,744 posts, read 730,301 times
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Thanks again for everyone who posted. I just wanted some reassurance that I wasn't totally pathological for not wanting to travel, and some of you provided that. I especially appreciate those of you who enjoy travel but can understand/accept that someone else does not. I really liked Little Dolphin's comment about it sounding somewhat like nirvana and the ceasing of desires. For me happiness is more about wanting what I have, but I do understand that other people find happiness going after what they want (which often seems to be travel to somewhere else).

I'll try not to worry too much that my worldview/personal growth is being diminished by my lack of travel. As long as I am open to new people, new books, new films, new foods, etc., I think I'll be okay. And while some of you sound like very accomplished travelers, I am convinced that travel doesn't always broaden people personally (except maybe in the hips if they eat too much!). A recent case in point was the Alabama teenager who posted selfies of herself grinning at Auschwitz. She obviously didn't get what the place represented or feel the pain that was there. It was just another photo op.

I've never gotten that much from travel. I'm one of the few people who didn't "get" Stonehenge. I understand that its fascinating to ponder about how the rocks got there, but seeing it in person didn't do anything for me. In fact, the souvenir shop that was right next to it actually detracted from the experience for me!

But everyone is different. I have a friend who just got back from a river cruise to Russia. She was so into continuing the experience that she played a CD of Russian folk music...twice during the couple of hours I was visiting her! I have nothing against Russian folk music, but it isn't at the top of my musical interests...and having to hear it twice did not add to my enjoyment! I've never been into continuing a trip after I got back by looking at photos, wearing clothes from where I went, or drinking wines from where I went (my father in law was notorious for this. Loved Italian and French wines until he went to Australia, and then it was all about Australian wines until he went somewhere else. Yes, I see where travel could help you discover new things----like wine that you didn't know about---but it seemed more like a showoffy type thing---"I went to Australia and now I am an Australian wine connisseur," but I didn't like my FIL, so perhaps that is coloring my perception of it).

Years ago as a teenager I had that poster with a flower that said "Bloom where you are planted." I hope that's what I am doing, without travel. If ever I feel like I am withering away in mind, body, or spirit by not going elsewhere, then I will attempt travel as the remedy. But in the meantime, I am loving sleeping in my own bed and eating my own food (yes, I do get out for a meal once or twice a week, but you get the picture).
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:50 PM
 
15,216 posts, read 31,195,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Thanks again for everyone who posted. I just wanted some reassurance that I wasn't totally pathological for not wanting to travel, and some of you provided that. I especially appreciate those of you who enjoy travel but can understand/accept that someone else does not. I really liked Little Dolphin's comment about it sounding somewhat like nirvana and the ceasing of desires. For me happiness is more about wanting what I have, but I do understand that other people find happiness going after what they want (which often seems to be travel to somewhere else).

I'll try not to worry too much that my worldview/personal growth is being diminished by my lack of travel. As long as I am open to new people, new books, new films, new foods, etc., I think I'll be okay. And while some of you sound like very accomplished travelers, I am convinced that travel doesn't always broaden people personally (except maybe in the hips if they eat too much!). A recent case in point was the Alabama teenager who posted selfies of herself grinning at Auschwitz. She obviously didn't get what the place represented or feel the pain that was there. It was just another photo op.

I've never gotten that much from travel. I'm one of the few people who didn't "get" Stonehenge. I understand that its fascinating to ponder about how the rocks got there, but seeing it in person didn't do anything for me. In fact, the souvenir shop that was right next to it actually detracted from the experience for me!

But everyone is different. I have a friend who just got back from a river cruise to Russia. She was so into continuing the experience that she played a CD of Russian folk music...twice during the couple of hours I was visiting her! I have nothing against Russian folk music, but it isn't at the top of my musical interests...and having to hear it twice did not add to my enjoyment! I've never been into continuing a trip after I got back by looking at photos, wearing clothes from where I went, or drinking wines from where I went (my father in law was notorious for this. Loved Italian and French wines until he went to Australia, and then it was all about Australian wines until he went somewhere else. Yes, I see where travel could help you discover new things----like wine that you didn't know about---but it seemed more like a showoffy type thing---"I went to Australia and now I am an Australian wine connisseur," but I didn't like my FIL, so perhaps that is coloring my perception of it).

Years ago as a teenager I had that poster with a flower that said "Bloom where you are planted." I hope that's what I am doing, without travel. If ever I feel like I am withering away in mind, body, or spirit by not going elsewhere, then I will attempt travel as the remedy. But in the meantime, I am loving sleeping in my own bed and eating my own food (yes, I do get out for a meal once or twice a week, but you get the picture).
jazzcat, I pretty much feel like you - I don't like traveling all that much. And the trips have to be short if I do. I too have cats to worry about, and a few minor health issues (bad back, diabetes) I have trouble sleeping, and if I travel cannot sleep at all. I still hope to be able to travel at least a little when my hubby retires in 7 years, but by then I will be in my 70s so who knows. At least I live in a beautiful town and am happy to take little day trips. I don't really have a huge pressing need to go to a lot of places, especially since it costs a lot of money. And I really, really hate flying.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,763,041 times
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Default That's right - travel is not automatically broadening.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post

I'll try not to worry too much that my worldview/personal growth is being diminished by my lack of travel. As long as I am open to new people, new books, new films, new foods, etc., I think I'll be okay. And while some of you sound like very accomplished travelers, I am convinced that travel doesn't always broaden people personally (except maybe in the hips if they eat too much!). A recent case in point was the Alabama teenager who posted selfies of herself grinning at Auschwitz. She obviously didn't get what the place represented or feel the pain that was there. It was just another photo op.
As an occasional traveler who enjoys travel, I must say I agree that travel is not automatically broadening. If a person is narrow-minded, biased, poorly informed, etc., it's not likely that travel is going to change any of that. And if a person is interested in learning about the world, travel is NOT the only way to accomplish that. But if the traveler has the right attitude (for example, tries to get past a superficial contact with and understanding of people in different places), travel CAN be educational and broadening.

And there are a few things that just aren't quite the same in pictures, such as the Grand Canyon and Carlsbad Caverns.

There may be personal reasons which make travel enjoyable. I am now almost 2,000 miles away from Los Angeles. In the past nine days I have visited in person with eight different cousins in three different cities, including a few spouses of cousins and children of cousins. For me personally (and I'm not claiming that everyone feels the same way), these longish face-to-face visits with cousins are so worthwhile and trump exchanging pictures and talking on the phone. I realize that other people may not give a damn about their cousins, and I see nothing wrong with that.

In addition to those family visits, I've been to two museums, both of which I felt were well worth it: the (elder) Bush Presidential Museum in College Station, Texas, and the National World War II Museum (formerly called the D-Day Museum) in New Orleans just this morning. I am interested in history and especially interested in World War II. Those two museums may have meant nothing (and may have thus been totally boring) to many people, but I was totally captivated and energized by being there.

I do not care a whit if anyone is impressed by what I have done and seen. In fact, my particular way of traveling is not especially impressive. I do it because I find it enjoyable and satisfying personally.
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Old 07-30-2014, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,629 posts, read 9,701,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Like most of us who post here, I am plenty old enough to remember the days before airport security checks for passengers went into effect. Personally, I don't like standing in lines, whether at the airport or at the supermarket. And I agree that it's not "fun" to take off our shoes and empty our pockets into the plastic trays, then reverse the process after we have been cleared.

However, I don't see the process as being terribly onerous, and I am puzzled that some people find it sufficiently inconvenient and unpleasant to swear off flying entirely. What is the big deal, actually? We spend an extra 30 minutes (more or less, depending on the length of the lines) in the security check in order to board a flight. Are we, as retirees, so much in a hurry that 30 minutes makes a real difference?

Now before someone jumps in to misunderstand me, I agree that we are all free to choose what we will do or refuse to do, and that those choices should not be condemned unless they are harming ourselves or others. Refusing to brush and floss our teeth harms us in the long run, but refusing to travel by air harms no one. I am only seeking to understand, or "grasp" something that I don't find understandable.

I don't fly very often. My last flight was about nine months ago, when I flew from Los Angeles to Little Rock, Arkansas and back to attend the wedding of my niece. I wanted to attend the wedding, but I had limited time to be gone and driving there and back (besides requiring more time than I had at that moment) would have been more expensive than flying, especially counting a couple of motel stays each way. Renting a car at the airport was quick and convenient, likewise dropping it off upon departure, as the rental car companies compete against each other for business and they have worked out (over the years) ways to minimize the delays and inconveniences to their customers.

My age (69 at the time - nine months ago) had no bearing on the whole process. It was no more difficult or problematic for me at 69 than it would have been for a 25-year-old.

Keeping in mind that I have no quarrel with people who refuse to fly, sort of like I have no quarrel with people who refuse to drink coffee or see foreign films or listen to classical music, who can explain to me what is such a hassle about flying?
I'm with you. I don't see the 'big deal' about flying, or moreso the procedures before the flight. I hadn't flown in many years, mostly because I had nowhere to fly TO and so I didn't, till this past March. I flew up to So. Dakota to see my sister and family. It wasn't bad at all. Certainly nothing like I expected from all the 'stuff' I've heard over the years. The lines were long but there were people to talk to. It was quite a long wait from checking in to boarding but, again, people to talk to and things to see, magazines to buy, etc..

The only thing I get nervous about is the possibility that the plane might crash! lol Thinking about how many thousands of flights there are in a day I know it's a silly fear but it's there anyway. So far, so good! I expect it'll be a good long time before I fly again, unless it's an emergency...which my trip in March was!...but that's mostly because I love to drive, take my time and see what I want to see. I cherish my road trips, have a good time all by myself and try to do them several times a year.

I've noticed that it's the younger people who are in such a hurry, not the retirees! It's the same at work. If I've heard it once I've heard it 100 times..."Take your time! I'm retired and in no rush". lol
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