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Old 07-29-2014, 12:49 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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I think we've always had roundabouts or rotaries in MA. There's a somewhat famous one in the town next to where I grew up and it's right in the town center. It always was a little bit intimidating because all the main roads in town converge there and you look to the right and to the right of right and then to the right of the right of right and then....

The worst ones I've seen are in Gloucester, MA where there are several, one after the other. They're not as complicated as the one I was just describing but if you aren't familiar with the exits you can go round and round like a revolving door. You think you'll never get out.

They can be difficult for anyone at any age until they learn the rules of how to navigate them.
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Old 07-29-2014, 04:34 AM
 
12,683 posts, read 14,063,903 times
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In my sixties I emigrated to a country that seemed to be on a national plan to wipe every four corners intersection in the nation. And God bless 'em, they are almost there....at least in my town and area.

I absolutely love roundabouts, and especially the ones that have replaced intersections where more than two roads crossed.
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Old 07-29-2014, 05:43 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,427 posts, read 1,664,703 times
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We call it the traffic circle in our NY town and was the first I had ever seen. It made total sense, but it's pretty easy with just one lane. One morning coming home from work I saw a car that looked like no one was in it. It actually did have a driver; one of those elderly ladies that look through the steering wheel to see and she went around three times before finally making it out.

The one in FL has three lanes, is fairly new and confusing to many even though the lanes are well marked. I know people that take other routes to avoid it. I understand how it works, but it's a definite time to use defensive driving when I'm in it.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:40 AM
 
Location: in the miseries
3,302 posts, read 3,577,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
I don't see how they're better than a 4 way stop. At least then, you know who has the right of way.
In a traffic circle (roundabout) nobody/everybody has the right of way.
Right of way is the vehicle in the rotary.
Cars entering must wait.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:43 AM
 
Location: in the miseries
3,302 posts, read 3,577,670 times
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E R try Lima Peru for traffic
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Old 07-29-2014, 08:10 AM
 
307 posts, read 472,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
Roundabouts are circular causeways that allow traffic to flow in a four-way intersection without stop lights or signs. This new way of managing traffic is meant to save lives, but they have some older driver's heads' spinning.

AARP runs a program that helps older drivers learn how to better navigate traffic in their golden years. They asked 200 of their volunteer driving instructors which traffic situations were considered the most challenging for their students.

Seniors struggle with roundabouts | Fox News

They're suppose to be safer...but not really sure about that. I've had more close calls from idiots dangerously cutting in front of me to get to the right lane because they started off coming into the roundabout on the wrong lane. Most of the roundabouts I've driven on in the U.S. (except in the larger metro cities) are a breeze...compared to the ones I've driven on overseas. Try going around the Arc de Triomphe in Paris! Twelve avenues converging on that one circle...thousands of vehicles trying to cut you off as you attempt to move closest to the avenue where you want to go. That was a regular commute route for me when I was stationed there. Enough to get you totally frazzled within a couple of weeks. Of course there are other routes to take....but usually too many bottlenecks. You know what I mean if you've ever driven there...or in Seoul, or Tokyo..or Manila...or Bangkok...as I have. So far...been a senior for a long time....haven't found it difficult driving on roundabouts....just challenging at times. Just be careful...and make sure you're on the proper lane when you start going into the roundabout...so you don't cut somebody off. And go a tad slower on the roundabouts. Ignore others who will honk you for being careful...for slowing them down. They're just "*"#!" (you know what I mean).
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Old 07-29-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,055 posts, read 6,009,521 times
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I agree with those who wrote they are used to them in Europe. A lot of us are not. Even if I learned how to drive in them, there would still be new comers who didn't know.

We have tons of four-way stops in Iowa. I also have to keep an eye on drivers there for the same reason. Lots of larger places have done away with them, and some drivers forget what they learned about them in Driver's Ed, especially if they are from other cities out of state.
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Old 07-29-2014, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,611 posts, read 9,674,534 times
Reputation: 10948
Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
Roundabouts are circular causeways that allow traffic to flow in a four-way intersection without stop lights or signs. This new way of managing traffic is meant to save lives, but they have some older driver's heads' spinning.

AARP runs a program that helps older drivers learn how to better navigate traffic in their golden years. They asked 200 of their volunteer driving instructors which traffic situations were considered the most challenging for their students.

Seniors struggle with roundabouts | Fox News
I don't have a problem with the roundabouts but I do think they are gas wasters where I live. Most of the ones we have are on a road with a 45 MPH limit so you get up to speed and then have to slow way down to get through, then speed up again. That's rough on a car and mileage, I would think. The first one they ever put in here got run into, head on, by some lady who wasn't paying attention. Hard to believe, but true! They are also bad for 18 wheeler trucks who HAVE to use that road here. I think most of the black marks on the curbs are from 18 wheelers. My brother drives one and he hates those roundabouts.
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Old 07-29-2014, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,611 posts, read 9,674,534 times
Reputation: 10948
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I think we've always had roundabouts or rotaries in MA. There's a somewhat famous one in the town next to where I grew up and it's right in the town center. It always was a little bit intimidating because all the main roads in town converge there and you look to the right and to the right of right and then to the right of the right of right and then....

The worst ones I've seen are in Gloucester, MA where there are several, one after the other. They're not as complicated as the one I was just describing but if you aren't familiar with the exits you can go round and round like a revolving door. You think you'll never get out.

They can be difficult for anyone at any age until they learn the rules of how to navigate them.
The first roundabout I ever experienced was in downtown Detroit. THAT was scary! lol After I got through it I vowed to never do that again. This was years ago and I probably wouldn't be bothered by it now but it was awful back then.
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Old 07-29-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,388 posts, read 9,134,430 times
Reputation: 13025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
The freeways of Los Angeles are very easy to drive on, and I am 70. They are well marked (i.e., large easy-to-read signs well in advance). I have never understood why people talk about Los Angeles freeways as if they were some sort of big deal. Maybe if someone is such a small town hick he has never encountered a road wider than one lane in each direction, it can seem intimidating at first.

I have driven in both Paris and Rome (although a long time ago), and there is no comparison. Los Angeles is so tame.
It's not about being well marked...

It's about how people drive
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