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Old 08-23-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Moving in retirement is not just about fleeing the perceived intolerable conditions (examples: snow, taxes, high cost of living, traffic, etc.) in the town you are leaving. It’s also not just about pretty, cheap and good weather in the new town. It’s about moving to a new place that offers you things to do when you will be home now for a big chunk of time. Know what it is you want to do in retirement (how you are going to fill up a 40 hour former work week with other daytime activities). Don't compromise because of cheap and pretty. Examples: If you like to go to plays and ethnic restaurants, don't move near the ocean or to the mountains just because it's pretty there or it's cheap, if you have to drive 30 - 50 miles to do the things you like to do. If you enjoy museums, don't move to some place where the taxes are cheap and the trees are pretty but there are no big museums for 50 miles.

Truer words were never spoken. It's so easy for retirees to want to move to a place they've only vacationed in and loved—usually beach, mountains, lake regions. Lovely on vacation, but what is there going to be to actually do (besides strolls and video games and TV) evenings and the other days of the week in the long retirement years? Life's not a beach (or a mountain) 24/7. One can commute to these. Much more important is, as you say, what's going to fill our time and how are we going to make friends to replace the frequent interactions with the friends we left behind. Most folks assume making friends is a cinch. I'm not one of them. Friendships can take years to build. If one is moving solo, the new place can provide a lot of lonely/lonesome time. If one is moving with a partner/spouse, depending primarily on that one person for socialization can get, well, sort of insulated.
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:04 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,428 posts, read 1,665,603 times
Reputation: 8653
I read a thoughtful and interesting book called Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do by Wallace J. Nichols. It put into words how I feel about water. I felt it the first time I saw Lake Michigan and then the ocean. My favorite memories of vacations were at the Outer Banks and at a cottage on Lake Dowajiac in MI. We've sailed on the Hudson for years, kayaked and canoed on rivers. If there is water, I'm happy as is DH.

We are in FL for the grandkids, but we asked ourselves if we would be happy if they moved and with the Gulf nearby, we decided we would.

I honestly believe I would be happy anywhere I retired, but now I understand better why water has such a pull on me and that I'm not alone. It's an interesting book for those who love water.
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Old 08-29-2014, 05:58 PM
 
6,784 posts, read 3,857,072 times
Reputation: 15486
I definitely agree about living by the water. Fourteen years ago we took early retirement, left the northwest and headed to Hilo Hi. We bought a condo right on the water and loved it. After 3 years we had to return to the mainland to care for an elderly parent, so we sold the condo in Hi.

We are now heading back to Hilo. This time we will just rent in order to keep our options open. I am sure we'll want/need to be closer to our kids at some point and don't want that to be some long distance hassel for any or us!

I know Hilo wouldn't suit most retirees (too 3rd world and unsophisticated), but for me the simplicity and friendliness of the people is just fine. Swimming % sunning daily, eating fresh fruit and vegies, various festivals all year long, the historic Palace Theater, painting outdoors and having a great place for friends & family to visit. That's all I need.
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Old 08-30-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Maryland
282 posts, read 305,808 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn
I always thought Nevada was known to be the best bec of no state taxes.
Hands down.
No?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
States with no income tax:
  • Alaska.
  • Florida.
  • Nevada.
  • South Dakota.
  • Texas.
  • Washington.
  • Wyoming.
Also account for the other taxes:
- Property tax (realestate and some states personal property tax) Can be high in FL, TX
- Sales tax (not as big as some think, but worth calculating)
- Homeowners insurance can vary a lot too (hurricane, flood areas)

Also, some states have income tax but they don't tax retirement income (Social Security, Pensions, etc).
New York is a example of high income tax, but they don't tax many types of retirement income.
Check Alabama, Louisiana, Tennesee.
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Old 08-30-2014, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Idaho
2,512 posts, read 2,274,913 times
Reputation: 5256
Best place to retire is what is best for you (and any significant others, if there are any).
I chose Idaho for a few reasons:
Taxes are favorable for a retired person...
Weather is great for those of us who prefer four seasons and like winter
Camping in high pine forests
Costs of housing are low, at least in the southeast part of the state....
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Old 08-30-2014, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
I read a thoughtful and interesting book called Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do by Wallace J. Nichols. It put into words how I feel about water. I felt it the first time I saw Lake Michigan and then the ocean. My favorite memories of vacations were at the Outer Banks and at a cottage on Lake Dowajiac in MI. We've sailed on the Hudson for years, kayaked and canoed on rivers. If there is water, I'm happy as is DH.

We are in FL for the grandkids, but we asked ourselves if we would be happy if they moved and with the Gulf nearby, we decided we would.

I honestly believe I would be happy anywhere I retired, but now I understand better why water has such a pull on me and that I'm not alone. It's an interesting book for those who love water.
That is interesting.

I must read that book.

I have spent a good deal of time underwater/ice.

For many years I averaged 7months per year, living underwater/ice. [most of the years from the late-70s, through the 80s and 90s that is].

I can not say that it made me any happier or healthier.

"... More Connected ..." hmm, no females, no phone, no mail, for months at a time, ...

"... Better at What You Do ..." I have always enjoyed punching up through ice shelf. That is a neat experience. Launching satellites into orbit is a lot of fun from underwater, not sure if it makes you any better at doing it though.





I am glad you are enjoying retirement. I am also enjoying my retirement.
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Old 08-30-2014, 07:06 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,428 posts, read 1,665,603 times
Reputation: 8653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
That is interesting.

I must read that book.

"... More Connected ..." hmm, no females, no phone, no mail, for months at a time, ...

Hmm, this book may not be for everyone. As far as the above ^, when one of DH's co-workers finished his time in the submarine service and was a civilian, he and his wife had Irish twins (siblings born within 12 months of each other). Long absences make the heart fonder, or something like that.
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Old 08-31-2014, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,937 posts, read 83,597,281 times
Reputation: 41745
These studies do one thing, if nothing else: they give us something to talk about on City Data or with our friends. Other than that they probably mean almost nothing. For each of us, retirement means something a little different and what works for one, may not work for the next person. Some people need to be close to family, some want the best possible weather, others want change in climate.

I think we can all agree, unless we are independently wealthy cost of living is near the top of everyone's list: good medical facilities are up there as well and decent housing. After that, everyone's wants are a little different.
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Old 08-31-2014, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
15,367 posts, read 12,119,741 times
Reputation: 16603
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSRSJim View Post
Also account for the other taxes:
- Property tax (realestate and some states personal property tax) Can be high in FL, TX
- Sales tax (not as big as some think, but worth calculating)
- Homeowners insurance can vary a lot too (hurricane, flood areas)

Also, some states have income tax but they don't tax retirement income (Social Security, Pensions, etc).
New York is a example of high income tax, but they don't tax many types of retirement income.
Check Alabama, Louisiana, Tennesee.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara
States with no income tax:
  • Alaska.
  • Florida.
  • Nevada.
  • South Dakota.
  • Texas.
  • Washington.
  • Wyoming.
THANK YOU! You two...

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Old 08-31-2014, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
15,367 posts, read 12,119,741 times
Reputation: 16603
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
How to Research Retirement Relocation
Moving in retirement is not just about fleeing the perceived intolerable conditions
1. The very first thing you should figure out is what’s important to you.
2. For the things you like to do and the things you like to have, the new place should offer those things in the abundance, variety and quality that you are used to having.
3. When doing research, do a “City Compare” (Google it) and compare where you live now to the places you are considering because you know what it feels like where you live now.
4. When you ask questions in a forum like City Data’s State forums, ask specific question that won’t elicit a feelings response.
5. Subscribe to the local newspaper or read it on line for at least 6 months.

6. If you want to know what’s in a town, check the online yellow pages for that town.
7. If you are relocating to escape some intolerable condition don't overcompensate.
8. When you visit, don't visit like a tourist, visit like a potential future resident.
9. Going on vacation to a town is not the same as living in that town no matter how many years you've visited.
10. If you see a house or apartment you might consider, go sit in your car and observe the area at night when kids are home from school and adults are home from work.

11. Assess your potential town and home in terms of the impact of escalating fuel prices.
12. If you are close to your family ask yourself, "If I move to be near my children, am I sure they are staying put?"

13. Don't be discouraged about retirement based on what you see in retirement destination magazines.
14. How hard is it to get a doctor to take you as a new patient?
15. Do a YouTube search of the towns you are considering as well as a Google Images search.
I am blown away at the care and time you spent writing this for us, Laura...back a page
or 2 is the post in full...
shortened here if someone missed it....
Thank you!
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