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Old 07-31-2014, 07:32 AM
 
7,979 posts, read 11,657,672 times
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My general impression is that it is fairly easy for US citizens to own vacation property in Canada.
Harder to live there in retirement. Anyone ever applied for a permanent resident permit?
Apparently you can live there for 6 months or less a year (i.e. snowbird) fairly easily but more than that you need to get a permanent resident permit which requires you have ample funds to take care of yourself.
Not sure what is considered ample, how long it takes and how hard it really is.
What about taxes?

I'm not planning on this but it did cross my mind. An area I (and others) was targeting for retirement because of its nature, beauty and peace is now getting a big race track - promoted by the CEO of Monster Drinks. If he wants to do something for his home area why doesn't he just give it an endowment as opposed to ruin it forever? Or - open a Monster Factory! Better than seasonal jobs selling hot dogs! So Stupid.

Last edited by Giesela; 07-31-2014 at 08:52 AM..
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Old 07-31-2014, 08:23 AM
 
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I was thinking about this as well. And there is some info on the Canada board. But I'd love to see what info we get here.
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Old 07-31-2014, 08:51 AM
 
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There are many requirements imposed by Canada if one wants to become a permanent resident (plus of course the cost involved):

Welcome BC - Become a Permanent Resident

Definitely nothing like walking across the border into the USA and getting all kinds of freebies and amnesty.
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Old 07-31-2014, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Out in the Badlands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
There are many requirements imposed by Canada if one wants to become a permanent resident (plus of course the cost involved):

Welcome BC - Become a Permanent Resident

Definitely nothing like walking across the border into the USA and getting all kinds of freebies and amnesty.
No kidding...you hit that proverbial nail on the proverbial head!
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Old 07-31-2014, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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I would in a heartbeat. I have family there. But I wouldn't meet the requirements and I can't say as I blame them for having strict ones.
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Old 07-31-2014, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Ottawa Valley & Dunedin FL
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It is indeed tough to become a Permanent Resident. Didn't used to be, but times have changed. If you're young enough, and have the right credentials, you could pass the immigration test. Another way is to get a NAFTA job, i.e., be offered a job here in a specialized field like technology. Degrees, etc. are required, and that job offer. These jobs can lead to permanent residence in time.

I'm not sure, they used to have an "economic"-type of permit, for people bringing substantial money into the country. But that may have been abolished.

So, it's the same as for we Canadians who spend time in the States--6 months a year max, or close to that, and no help from whatever safety nets the countries provide for their own--as for taxes, you'd still file and pay taxes in your main country of residence. You'd need medical insurance, although it probably would be cheaper than what we Canadian snowbirds pay, since the cost of medical care here is much lower.
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Old 07-31-2014, 04:51 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
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DH would occasionally travel into Canada for work throughout the years. The last few times he went, several years ago, were logistical nightmares. Corporate lawyers had to prepare reams of paperwork that he had to carry with him to get through immigrations(?) at the airport. All of it proving he was not there working and taking a Canadian's job and that he was either consulting or doing a one time only unique job. It will be interesting to see what it takes for retirees from the US to retire to Canada these days.
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Old 07-31-2014, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
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My partner is Canadian. It is indeed hard to become a permanent resident there unless there is a marriage involved. Even then, it is not easy or cheap. Good for Canada...make it hard!!!!
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Old 07-31-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Near a river
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Did I read somewhere that retirees must have something like $300K in assets to become a Canadian citizen? Will look it up.
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Old 07-31-2014, 06:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Did I read somewhere that retirees must have something like $300K in assets to become a Canadian citizen? Will look it up.
It is a whole lot more complicated than that:

Business & Investment Immigration

There are probably 5-6 different programs. The one above is more geared toward the investor/ entrepreneur class.

On the skilled worker programs, you get demerits for being older, which would make sense.

In the 1970s-80s, Canada had a pretty open immigration policy. Over the years, that has tightened somewhat. It is NOT impossible but a bit more difficult.

When I was younger, I considered moving to Toronto to work. I had spent some time at Carleton University and the University of Toronto, two fine universities. At the time, all my doctors and a good number of my professors studied in Toronto and were encouraging me.

If you are thinking about it, do your research. Life in Canada is different - some aspects are more favorable than the US, others are not. The media makes the health care system to be a near perfect system which it is not. I will say that on average, the educational system is better.
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