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Old 08-15-2014, 09:39 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,072,092 times
Reputation: 8970

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
Something about your posting seems kind of odd.

You graduated from college more than 35 years ago. Back in those days tuition wasn't nearly as high as it is today. It was entirely possible back then to work part-time and in the summers and essentially cover your costs. If you went to say CUNY their tuition then was very low even for those times.

Several universities offered co-op programs at that time which students could enroll in that paid most if not all of their tuition plus living expenses. The one that I am most familiar with is Ga Tech. I went to graduate school there way back when (a few years before your time) and this program was very popular among the students then. I know that other universities around the country offered the same types of program back then (but don't know about today, haven't checked).

In short, there were very viable ways to graduate from a university with little (if any) debt in those times. And if your GPA and SAT were as high as you say, you could have found ways to avoid student loans I'm thinking.

Shrug, my GPA was 3.9 and my verbal-math ("old") SAT scores were 620-720 = 1340.

I was academically recruited by a university that was going after every National Merit type at the time, but they offered me no money. My dorm roomie was a step ahead of me and was offered a free ride scholarship by the university. He went on to become a law professor and a judge.
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,874,457 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Shrug, my GPA was 3.9 and my verbal-math ("old") SAT scores were 620-720 = 1340.

I was academically recruited by a university that was going after every National Merit type at the time, but they offered me no money. My dorm roomie was a step ahead of me and was offered a free ride scholarship by the university. He went on to become a law professor and a judge.
Out of curiosity, did you maintain the same GPA at your university as in high school and make equivalent scores on the GRE?

In any event, it was very poor choice on your part. And as it appears, so was your life later also.

To make no more than working at McDonald after being an honor graduate in high school, graduating from a university and doing that same kind of work for 35 YEARS??? It makes absolutely no sense. Unless, you had major problems - like legal, severe addictions (drugs/alcohol), personality issues.
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:59 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,072,092 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
Out of curiosity, did you maintain the same GPA at your university as in high school and make equivalent scores on the GRE?

In any event, it was very poor choice on your part. And as it appears, so was your life later also.

To make no more than working at McDonald after being an honor graduate in high school, graduating from a university and doing that same kind of work for 35 YEARS??? It makes absolutely no sense. Unless, you had major problems - like legal, severe addictions (drugs/alcohol), personality issues.

3.5 in college and never took the GRE. Graduated with no marketable skills and no desire to pursue the typical jobs available to liberal arts majors (sales, retailing, insurance). Once I was five years past graduation with no career-related experience, I was pretty much unemployable outside the menial job sector.
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Old 08-15-2014, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,874,457 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
3.5 in college and never took the GRE. Graduated with no marketable skills and no desire to pursue the typical jobs available to liberal arts majors (sales, retailing, insurance). Once I was five years past graduation with no career-related experience, I was pretty much unemployable outside the menial job sector.
With the high school GPA and SAT that you had, you'd have had a real shot at an Ivy League university.

And so, at age 26-27 you were over the hill (so to speak)? BULL. Thats a weak excuse. So is having a liberal arts degree (many people have done quite well over the years with those).

Did it ever occur to you that it was up to you to make a change in your life after a few months of nothing? And that no one could or would do that for you? Joining the military would have been a good choice for you. Also, working for the gov't. Or teaching maybe. Entry level computer jobs. Banks. It was a different world back then.

And yet you were quite satisfied working at the equivalent of burger flipping for 35 years. And now, you are complaining. Slow learner you are.

You are where you are today because of your own choices. Entirely of your own making.

Last edited by Weichert; 08-16-2014 at 12:28 AM..
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Old 08-16-2014, 03:14 AM
 
71,691 posts, read 71,801,099 times
Reputation: 49257
X
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Do you have a reference?
To many to list. Just google rising glide path michael kitces

Or rising glide path dr wade pfau
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Old 08-16-2014, 09:39 AM
 
2,000 posts, read 1,190,064 times
Reputation: 2280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
Something about your posting seems kind of odd.

You graduated from college more than 35 years ago. Back in those days tuition wasn't nearly as high as it is today. It was entirely possible back then to work part-time and in the summers and essentially cover your costs. If you went to say CUNY their tuition then was very low even for those times.

Several universities offered co-op programs at that time which students could enroll in that paid most if not all of their tuition plus living expenses. The one that I am most familiar with is Ga Tech. I went to graduate school there way back when (a few years before your time) and this program was very popular among the students then. I know that other universities around the country offered the same types of program back then (but don't know about today, haven't checked).

In short, there were very viable ways to graduate from a university with little (if any) debt in those times. And if your GPA and SAT were as high as you say, you could have found ways to avoid student loans I'm thinking.
You bring up a very good point and one that isn't discussed nearly enough. I call it the 'in my day' crowd.

In my day I worked my way through college and graduated with no debt.
In my day I bought a house by scrimping and saving and now I own it free and clear.
In my day I worked my way up the corporate ladder by working hard and showing up everyday.

Etc etc…
In my day was before we saw double digit price inflation of college, healthcare, food, and housing (without corresponding increases in wages). In your day they had pensions, job security, and opportunity.
Your day has come and gone.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:14 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,186,293 times
Reputation: 22375
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysgenic View Post
You bring up a very good point and one that isn't discussed nearly enough. I call it the 'in my day' crowd.

In my day I worked my way through college and graduated with no debt.
In my day I bought a house by scrimping and saving and now I own it free and clear.
In my day I worked my way up the corporate ladder by working hard and showing up everyday.

Etc etc…
In my day was before we saw double digit price inflation of college, healthcare, food, and housing (without corresponding increases in wages). In your day they had pensions, job security, and opportunity.
Your day has come and gone.
But, the post was in reply to someone who has presented himself as a Boomer.

So in my day was also in his day.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:33 AM
 
2,000 posts, read 1,190,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
But, the post was in reply to someone who has presented himself as a Boomer.

So in my day was also in his day.
What I'm trying to get across is that the boomer generation tends to belief things are similar to 'their time'. They believe the generation X or generation Y are not successful because of a lack of motivation or drive.
It's not true.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:46 AM
 
9,204 posts, read 9,280,929 times
Reputation: 28845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
With the high school GPA and SAT that you had, you'd have had a real shot at an Ivy League university.

And so, at age 26-27 you were over the hill (so to speak)? BULL. Thats a weak excuse. So is having a liberal arts degree (many people have done quite well over the years with those).

Did it ever occur to you that it was up to you to make a change in your life after a few months of nothing? And that no one could or would do that for you? Joining the military would have been a good choice for you. Also, working for the gov't. Or teaching maybe. Entry level computer jobs. Banks. It was a different world back then.

And yet you were quite satisfied working at the equivalent of burger flipping for 35 years. And now, you are complaining. Slow learner you are.

You are where you are today because of your own choices. Entirely of your own making.
I have a great deal of difficulty sympathizing with that poster at all.

People who graduated from college 35 years ago, graduated during the time this country was at its economic height. IMO, If they couldn't find a decent career for themselves and make it under those conditions, they never had a chance of succeeding at all. The only people I exempt from this statement would be those with some type of mental or physical disability. I certainly don't include laziness, ordinary depression, or poor self esteem in those categories.

When it comes to politics, I am quite liberal and I can find sympathy for many people. However, liberalism has a weakness and that weakness is that it fails to take into account the fact that there are some people that really don't try and make an effort. There are people in this world who don't have any drive or ambition. Their sole goal is to get through life doing as little work as they possibly can. They don't want to do anything that might cause them stress, or would require them to learn new skills. They often are rather anti-social and they don't understand that meeting and communicating with new people is a critical skill to succeeding.

I suppose the advantage to "flipping burgers" is that you don't have to think very much to do it. Its a job where you can just sort of tune out everything, but the meat. As long as you don't burn it, you get to keep your job and bring home some sort of meager pay check.

Sorry, my sympathy goes to the truly disabled, the young generations today trying to find a way forward in a very competitive world, and to those who have been actual victims of discrimination based on the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, or their gender. We should never forget those groups and sometimes they should get our assistance. However, there is a great need to "weed out" the deserving from the non-deserving.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:54 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11705
^^^^^^^Bada Bing!
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