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Old 08-21-2014, 01:12 PM
 
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Several of my coworkers are in their late 70s or early 80s. All are millionaires, besides having a cushy defined-benefit pension waiting for them. Most have wives who are either lifelong stay-at-home-moms, or who retired decades ago – in some cases with pensions of their own. One fellow is well into his 80s. He retired after a 50+ year career, but then returned to work as a consultant. Another guy retired in the 1990s with a very lavish pension, but regularly comes into the office unpaid. He has a cubicle and computer, and a key-card accessing our building. All of these guys are in impeccable health, and are regulars at the gym. They're involved in community affairs, such as charities or religious organizations. But they refuse to distance themselves from professional employment. Why? Frequently I ask them. The answers are invariably evasive, but the gist is that for 40, 50 or 60 years, the man was defined by the job. To disavow that job is to disavow his very reason for existence. It's tantamount to suicide.
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Old 08-21-2014, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,769,854 times
Reputation: 47257
My soon to be 75 year old husband only cut back recently because his employer did not have as much work for him. Up till about 4 months ago he was flying all over the country in his engineering job. Now he is doing a lot of technical writing from home.
We have two 12 year old daughters (adopted) at home and he is very involved in their lives and quite frankly we like having him home.
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Old 08-21-2014, 01:54 PM
 
649 posts, read 554,243 times
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I am the anomoly I guess. I am going to work 2 more years. At 55 I will retire and not look back. My wife will also retire and she will only be 53. Neither of us has any desire to "work" again. Will we find things to keep us busy, yes, but they will be what we want to do, when we want to do them.

I am through having someone else dictate to me what I can or can't do with my time.

Besides, other than my service in the military, jobs have always been a means to an end.

I work to live, not live to work.
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Old 08-21-2014, 03:09 PM
 
491 posts, read 598,162 times
Reputation: 2095
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Several of my coworkers are in their late 70s or early 80s. All are millionaires, besides having a cushy defined-benefit pension waiting for them. Most have wives who are either lifelong stay-at-home-moms, or who retired decades ago in some cases with pensions of their own. One fellow is well into his 80s. He retired after a 50+ year career, but then returned to work as a consultant. Another guy retired in the 1990s with a very lavish pension, but regularly comes into the office unpaid. He has a cubicle and computer, and a key-card accessing our building. All of these guys are in impeccable health, and are regulars at the gym. They're involved in community affairs, such as charities or religious organizations. But they refuse to distance themselves from professional employment. Why? Frequently I ask them. The answers are invariably evasive, but the gist is that for 40, 50 or 60 years, the man was defined by the job. To disavow that job is to disavow his very reason for existence. It's tantamount to suicide.

I think this is one of the saddest posts I've read.
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Old 08-21-2014, 03:25 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,580 posts, read 10,923,342 times
Reputation: 19205
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Several of my coworkers are in their late 70s or early 80s. All are millionaires, besides having a cushy defined-benefit pension waiting for them. Most have wives who are either lifelong stay-at-home-moms, or who retired decades ago in some cases with pensions of their own. One fellow is well into his 80s. He retired after a 50+ year career, but then returned to work as a consultant. Another guy retired in the 1990s with a very lavish pension, but regularly comes into the office unpaid. He has a cubicle and computer, and a key-card accessing our building. All of these guys are in impeccable health, and are regulars at the gym. They're involved in community affairs, such as charities or religious organizations. But they refuse to distance themselves from professional employment. Why? Frequently I ask them. The answers are invariably evasive, but the gist is that for 40, 50 or 60 years, the man was defined by the job. To disavow that job is to disavow his very reason for existence. It's tantamount to suicide.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aqua Blue View Post
I think this is one of the saddest posts I've read.
Sad? Why? Because they love what they do?
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Old 08-21-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,769,854 times
Reputation: 47257
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Several of my coworkers are in their late 70s or early 80s. All are millionaires, besides having a cushy defined-benefit pension waiting for them. Most have wives who are either lifelong stay-at-home-moms, or who retired decades ago in some cases with pensions of their own. One fellow is well into his 80s. He retired after a 50+ year career, but then returned to work as a consultant. Another guy retired in the 1990s with a very lavish pension, but regularly comes into the office unpaid. He has a cubicle and computer, and a key-card accessing our building. All of these guys are in impeccable health, and are regulars at the gym. They're involved in community affairs, such as charities or religious organizations. But they refuse to distance themselves from professional employment. Why? Frequently I ask them. The answers are invariably evasive, but the gist is that for 40, 50 or 60 years, the man was defined by the job. To disavow that job is to disavow his very reason for existence. It's tantamount to suicide.
I don't see it that negatively at all. In fact quitting work after that kind of career is tantamount to suicide. Work and career give many people a reason to be alive, yes an identity. They are happy and enjoy their work. they don't see it as being chained to their work. Many people do not have that kind of association with their job or career but to those that do i say more power to them.

It may be hard to believe but many people do not want to travel, play bridge, lay in a hammock and go fishing. That's fine. One size does not fit all.
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Old 08-21-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
2,177 posts, read 2,916,070 times
Reputation: 5851
I have absolutely ZERO interest in retirement. No, I wont always stay at the job I currently have. But, I will always work. Why? because I LOVE working. I have never, ever, had a job I didnt like. Some better than others, sure. More importantly, I value the routine, the schedule, the validation, etc. The money is nice, sure, but not the biggest reason I work. I could afford to stop working any time I wanted. Still, staying home, watching TV, going out for lunch, etc holds no appeal for me.

For those who want to retire, best wishes to you. For me, I hope to work til I can no longer get out of the house.
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Old 08-21-2014, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Perth
87 posts, read 53,341 times
Reputation: 271
I dug up some stats to see what is happening at the national scale. % in the workforce 25-54 = 75%, 55-64 = 60%, 65+ = <20%. These would include part-time work as working 1 hour in the last 2 weeks means you are part of the workforce.


My wife and I both retired in our late 50s, I was "encouraged", my wife's work dried up but we were both tired of the rat race so have not looked at going back.
Looking at our parents, 3 were in no condition to work from their late 60s as health issues took over. However, my mum was full time volunteering till her late 80s - really depends on your attitude and the luck of the draw.
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Old 08-21-2014, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte
3,927 posts, read 4,779,422 times
Reputation: 3409
We have semi-retired. We will have no house payment, SS and retirement income. We will continue to work some (real estate appraisers) to supplement and to keep from going absolutely stir-crazy. But with our type of work, we still can spend time kayaking, setting on the beach, etc. Staycation-work lifestyle which will 'work' for us.
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Old 08-21-2014, 11:25 PM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,561,639 times
Reputation: 20505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tobiashen View Post
When Andy Rooney retired from "60 Minutes" at age 92, he died less than five weeks later.
I believe he retired because he knew he was gravely ill. I do think that might be the case for a lot of people, not that retirement kills them but that they retire because they are compromised.

I know my job does provide me with a social community of sorts but is also seriously affecting my health in a negative way (stress and hours). I do look forward to a time where retiring is an option (some four years away, financially) and might well continue in a very part-time slot for financial reasons and because I have no plans that require me to be away from the area for months at a time (I also have expensive tastes for travel, and board several dogs when I go anywhere. I am limited to a couple of weeks by desire and finances for trips and that's fine with me).

Most health stats for night workers (that's third shift) are poor by a dramatic percentage over those of people who work a "normal" schedule. I think retiring would be a huge improvement!
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